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Sadness

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NEWS
October 15, 2004 | By Dan Gottlieb
When I heard the news of Christopher Reeve's death, I felt great sadness, fear, anger and some loneliness. Only quadriplegics and their loved ones know what we go through. Christopher Reeve died of an infection related to a decubitus ulcer. Most are unaware that we get these ulcers (also known as pressure sores or bed sores) from sitting in one position for up to 18 hours a day. Most also don't know about the wild fluctuations in blood pressure or the bladder infections or of the consequences of catheters or the difficulty regulating bowels or the violent spasms that can wreak havoc with our daily lives.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cruel wind blew yesterday at the intersection of Allegheny and Aramingo Avenues, where skid marks, broken glass, and a makeshift tribute - all overshadowed by the sadness etched on faces - memorialized the death of another Philadelphia police officer. It was here that Sgt. Timothy Simpson was killed Monday night when, police said, a car driven by a career criminal carrying packets of heroin slammed into his cruiser. Simpson, 46, a decorated 20-year veteran, was the fourth officer killed in the line of duty in less than seven months.
NEWS
June 12, 1986
In Tom Ferrick's June 3 "Campaign '86: Analysis" article, I found a statement by Rep. Lawrence Coughlin (R., Pa.) very disturbing. Speaking of Montgomery County GOP chairman Bob Asher's indictment in the CTA case, Mr. Coughlin said, "This is a sad and tragic time for Bob and his family. " Similar comments came out of the Delaware County Courthouse when GOP controller James Scanlan quickly resigned after it was discovered he falsely portrayed himself as a CPA and was allegedly using his courthouse phone number for his private accounting practice.
SPORTS
January 23, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The tragedies pile one atop the next, like snow across the central hills, and the latest is that Joe Paterno, hectored by cancer and battered by the events of the last three months, lost his last battle with the clock on Sunday morning. Family and friends were called to the hospital throughout the day Saturday as the 85-year-old former coach's condition deteriorated and the final vigil began. There is nothing but sadness that all of it has happened. There was only that while reporting the story of child abuse that emerged from the Penn State campus, and only regret, a regret shared by Paterno, that more wasn't done to deal with a predator in their midst.
NEWS
September 5, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only at the end of a long, cheerful visit with Bob Butera and Marilyn Sifford does a little sadness slip into the conversation, and then only with prompting. We're sitting on a bench overlooking their woodland garden on almost two acres in Jeffersonville, Montgomery County, and Sifford is asked to explain her relationship to this splendid place. "I've lost so many people in my life," she begins: a brother at 17, a sister at 22, both parents within three months, and still others, including her first husband, Inquirer columnist Darrell Sifford, who drowned while snorkeling during the couple's vacation in Belize in 1992.
LIVING
September 5, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Only at the end of a long, cheerful visit with Bob Butera and Marilyn Sifford does a little sadness slip into the conversation, and then only with prompting. We're sitting on a bench overlooking their woodland garden on almost two acres in Jeffersonville, Montgomery County, and Sifford is asked to explain her relationship to this splendid place. "I've lost so many people in my life," she begins: a brother at 17, a sister at 22, both parents within three months, and still others, including her first husband, Inquirer columnist Darrell Sifford, who drowned while snorkeling during the couple's vacation in Belize in 1992.
NEWS
September 17, 2002
IDON'T KNOW who is responsible for that Sept. 11 editorial ("A Farewell to Tears"), but may I make a suggestion for that person - send it to one of the families of the victims of the World Trade Center, or the Pentagon or Flight 93. Because I think that they will agree that we should just stop crying over losing lives that were innocent. And you know what, America has moved on and we have become stronger and we have moved on and these cold calculating killers have not stopped us from moving on but . . . we can never stop crying, the sadness is too overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A Molotov cocktail of newsreel and motion-capture animation, Chicago 10 suggests that Karl Marx was half-right. History does not repeat itself the first time as tragedy and the second time as farce. In Brett Morgen's remix of news reports and political theater, the clash between antiwar protesters and police on the streets of the Windy City during the 1968 Democratic Convention, history reprises the first time as tragedy and the second time as cartoon. Cameras were not permitted in the courtroom where organizers of the protest subsequently were tried for conspiracy.
NEWS
June 19, 2015
THOUGH PIXAR is the closest thing in the movie business to a can't-miss studio, there has been grumbling recently that the company's been playing it safe. Pixar spent the first decade of the new century releasing completely original titles, seven in all, then started living off the dividends of sequels - "Toy Story 3," "Cars 2," "Monsters University. " Nit-pickers wondered: Had the company lost its nerve? If so, they've gone to the right fellow to get it back - Pete Docter, the animator who helmed "Up," the movie that concluded and perhaps capped its great 2000-09 run. No one can say Docter is playing it safe with "Inside Out," a boldly imagined animated feature that goes inside the brain of a sad, struggling girl, and breaks her emotions down into individual characters - Joy, Anger, Fear, Disgust, Sadness - all trying to manage the girl's mood.
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SPORTS
September 19, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
The garage door rose Thursday morning and a new season introduced itself. The morning sky, flimsy and blue the day before, had acquired a grave heftiness overnight. The newspaper rested among the first fallen sycamore leaves scattered across the lawn. Stepping outside, I shivered. And sighed. Autumn, when the air cools, the light fades, and the earth browns, is a melancholy season. "You expected to be sad in the fall," wrote Ernest Hemingway, who understood sadness. That's certainly true when you're a fan of a going-nowhere baseball team drearily playing out its September schedule.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Staff Writer
Donald Trump said here Friday that Philadelphia reflects the dire straits of major American cities, leaving African Americans with poor schools, unsafe neighborhoods, and a lack of jobs. "I know the city so well, because I went to college here, but it's very sad to see what's going on inside Philadelphia," the Wharton School graduate told the Inquirer in an interview. "It's gotten so much worse than when I was going. It's dangerous; the crime numbers are up. Your mayor is doing a terrible job. " As often is the case, Trump's barbs drew a challenge.
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Jason Nark, STAFF WRITER
A sad mime feigned a smile and struck a familiar pose, leaning into an invisible shelf in a dingy Northeast Philadelphia hotel he was then calling home. Billy Carwile, 62, was born deaf in Philadelphia and found a calling as a mime, training in Paris and performing all over the city and country for decades before he fell on hard times. Carwile and his mother, Anna, 86, had a simple wish when they came home to Philadelphia 20 months ago from Newport News, Va. They were looking to pool the roughly $2,000 a month they bring in from Social Security toward a house.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
I RECENTLY SAW a cartoon depicting a masculine-looking Michelle Obama scowling at a shapely Melania Trump, who's holding a Trump campaign sign. Next to the illustration are the words: "Make the first lady great again. " I think we've got a pretty great one already. It will be a sad day when first lady Michelle Obama moves out of the White House - no matter who takes her place. Flotus was in especially fine form Monday night as she formally endorsed Hillary Clinton for the presidency.
NEWS
July 21, 2016
By Frederick Lawrence Judge Merrick Garland has set a record he never sought and one of which no one, certainly not the U.S. Senate, should be proud. July 19 marks 125 days since President Obama nominated Garland to the Supreme Court to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia. The nomination passes the record for delay that the Senate set a century ago with the nomination of Louis D. Brandeis to the court. One hundred years ago, with a world in turmoil as a great war raged in Europe, a cultural and political battle unfolded in the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
Elites are in trouble. High levels of immigration are destabilizing our democracies. Politicians who put their short-term political interests over their countries' needs reap the whirlwind - for themselves but, more importantly, for their nations. Citizens who live in the economically ailing peripheries of wealthy nations are in revolt against well-off and cosmopolitan metropolitan areas. Older voters lock in decisions that young voters reject. Traditional political parties on the left and right are being torn asunder.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
By Jacquelyn Warr-Williams In the aftermath of the Orlando killings, there has been a tremendous outpouring of love and support for the victims and their families. But this tragedy has also brought to the surface the unbelievable hate that still exists for gay and transgender individuals. This hate is not anonymous, and it is not confined to one group of people. A California pastor openly commented that he was not going to mourn those who died in Orlando. He stated, "Are you sad that 50 sodomites were killed today?
NEWS
May 23, 2016
ISSUE | NATIVE AMERICANS A sad, continuing saga I applaud the Inquirer for publishing Jeff Gammage's articles about Native Americans' efforts to bring their relatives' remains home from the former Carlisle Indian Industrial School ("Never Forgotten," May 15; "On Indians' land, Army hears plea for remains," May 11; "Honoring ancestors," May 1; " 'Those kids never got to go home,' " March 20). The stories have given readers a rare look at Native Americans' historical experiences with forced assimilation and the ways in which those experiences continue to affect their communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have been together for eight years, but married only a few months. It took him a long time to finally marry me, and it ended up that I was the one to propose. I am 30, and he's 39. I know he loves me. I have always expressed that I want children, and he did, too. I have been off birth control and keeping track of my cycle, but now he doesn't want to make love. When I try to get him in the mood, he always finds an excuse. I told him he has had plenty of time to let me know whether he didn't want children.
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