CollectionsSadr City
IN THE NEWS

Sadr City

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the sprawling slum known as Sadr City, prominently displayed banners written in English taunt American soldiers. "Welcome," they declare, to a "second Vietnam. " Militiamen loyal to rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr regularly attack U.S. forces. Bystanders are struck by stray bullets. Residents suspected of helping the Americans are killed. In the last month, seven Iraqis, including the chairman of Sadr City's version of a city council, were killed in separate incidents, an Iraqi police official said.
NEWS
July 19, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
From directing traffic to organizing blood drives, the militia overseen by firebrand cleric Muqtada al-Sadr is taking control of Baghdad's largest neighborhood even as Iraqi and U.S. officials demand that the group disband. Sadr's office, not the beleaguered police station, is often the first stop for residents of the Sadr City neighborhood who want to report a crime in the teeming slum of three million people. Mahdi Army militiamen compete with the U.S. military to clean up trash.
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Even as U.S. officials expressed cautious optimism about the first 24 hours of a militia cease-fire in southern Iraq and continued to hope that a recently appointed Iraqi government would bring peace to the nation, more grisly violence broke out in Baghdad yesterday. In the first attack, a roadside bomb killed two U.S. soldiers and injured two others in the early-morning hours near the restive Baghdad neighborhood of Sadr City. It was the same section of town in which four soldiers were killed and five wounded the day before.
NEWS
November 14, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
Mohannad al-Kaabi was risking his life to build the kind of Iraqi democracy that President Bush has called for. He was in danger of assassination by Saddam bitter-enders. But, in fact, he was shot dead on Monday by a U.S. soldier in Baghdad. This disaster must be studied by U.S. planners to make sure nothing like it happens again. Kaabi was a handsome 28-year-old marine engineer who spoke excellent English. He headed the district council in Baghdad's huge Shiite Muslim slum of Sadr City.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Adam Schreck, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Car bombs tore through shopping areas within minutes of each other in mainly Shiite neighborhoods of the Iraqi capital on Sunday, killing at least 37 people and wounding more than 100. The attacks come amid rising sectarian discord in Iraq and appear aimed at shaking Iraqis' confidence in the Shiite-led government. The explosions struck at the start of the local work week and primarily targeted outdoor markets. Violence in Iraq has fallen since the height of sectarian fighting in 2006 and 2007, but insurgents still frequently launch lethal attacks against security forces and civilians.
NEWS
January 23, 2007
WHEN THE Daily News prints silly right-wing letters, Philadelphia looks stupid in the process. If Jason Conlan wants to compare Philadelphia to Iraq, we can have him walk down a street in North Philly, and on a bad day nothing would happen to him. But let's send him to Sadr City, in the heart of the Baghdad Shiite ghetto, and this lily-white Republican would be beheaded faster than you can say YouTube. And Tom Bell wants to send the majority that believe Iraq is a mess to Iraq.
NEWS
October 16, 2004 | By Hannah Allam and Huda Ahmed INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. warplanes bombed several suspected extremist hideouts in Fallujah yesterday, the first day of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, as peace talks there collapsed. In the capital, a car packed with 300 pounds of explosives detonated near an Iraqi police patrol and killed 10 Iraqi civilians, including four workers in a palm grove and a family of four traveling on the busy street, the U.S. military said. At least four Iraqi policemen were injured in the blast, which left a large crater and scattered debris and charred body parts for blocks.
NEWS
October 12, 2004 | By Omar Jassim and Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
With nervous looks on their faces and small arsenals in their cars, supporters of rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr trickled into Iraqi police stations yesterday to surrender weapons as part of a government arms-for-cash agreement to end weeks of fighting in Baghdad's dangerous Sadr City quarter. The day was hailed as a "good beginning" by Iraqi police and Sadr aides, though the government of interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawi still faces widespread violence and an escalating hostage crisis.
NEWS
April 16, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Eight months after the U.S. military claimed victory over the militia of Muqtada al-Sadr, the Shiite Muslim cleric's organization has grown in sophistication, won seats in the Iraqi National Assembly and on provincial councils, and continued to agitate for the expulsion of American forces from Iraq. The reemergence of Sadr, after hundreds if not thousands of his fighters were killed in uprisings last year, points to his continuing ability to harness the widespread discontent of Iraq's millions of poor Shiites.
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | By Drew Brown INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Coalition officials said a radical young cleric named Muqtada al-Sadr was behind a recent spate of suicide bombings and assassinations that they said he was using to try to gain power over Iraq's Shiite Muslim majority. But they have not yet decided how to deal with him for fear of touching off even worse violence. Coalition officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said they now thought that a car bombing Sunday at the Baghdad Hotel was a Sadr-inspired assassination attempt against Mouwafak al-Rabii, a moderate Shiite physician who sits on Iraq's U.S.-appointed Governing Council.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Adam Schreck and Sinan Salaheddin, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - A coordinated wave of car bombings tore through mostly Shiite areas of Baghdad on Monday, killing at least 66 people and maiming nearly 200 as insurgents step up the bloodshed roiling Iraq. The attacks in markets and other areas frequented by civilians are the latest sign of a rapid deterioration in security as sectarian tensions are exacerbated by antigovernment protests and the war in neighboring Syria grinds on. More than 450 people have been killed across Iraq in May. Most of the killings came over the last two weeks in the most sustained wave of violence since U.S. troops left in December 2011.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD - There was no "Mission Accomplished" banner. No victory parade down the center of this capital scarred by nearly nine years of war. No crowds of cheering Iraqis grateful for liberation from Saddam Hussein. It took the U.S. military just 45 minutes yesterday to declare an end to its war in Iraq with a businesslike closing ceremony behind concrete blast walls in a fortified compound at Baghdad International Airport. The flag used by U.S. forces in Iraq was lowered and boxed up. On the chairs - nearly empty of Iraqis - were tags that listed not only the name of the assigned VIP, but the bunker to rush to in case of an attack.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
Barack Obama was a principled opponent of the Iraq war from its beginning. But when he became president in January 2009, he was handed a war that was won. The surge had succeeded. Al-Qaeda in Iraq had been routed, driven to humiliating defeat by an Anbar Awakening of Sunnis fighting side by side with the infidel Americans. Even more remarkably, the Shiite militias had been taken down, with American backing, by the forces of Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. They crushed the Sadr militias from Basra to Sadr City.
NEWS
September 17, 2011
Norwegian liner is in less danger OSLO, Norway - Salvage teams reported progress Friday as they pumped water from a listing Norwegian cruise liner in danger of capsizing, a day after a fire on board killed two crew members and forced the evacuation of 260 people. The MS Nordlys, which tilted critically at an angle of 21.7 degrees in the morning, had slowly been righted and was listing at 16 degrees in the evening as additional pumps spewed water from the ship's bowels, officials said.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Patrick Kerkstra, Guest Columnist
When was the last time you spared a thought - any thought, good or ill - for the war in Iraq? It isn't actually over, the war, though it is easy to forget that, given the paucity of U.S. news coverage. Insurgents struck three Iraqi cities only yesterday, killing at least 60 in what analysts think was an attempt to ratchet up the terror level as the U.S. and Iraqi governments discuss a continued American presence in the country past 2011. That's right: Odds are that U.S. troops will still be in Iraq in 2012, two years after the ballyhooed 2010 withdrawal of the last combat brigade.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BAGHDAD - Abdullah Saadi fingers the fine, brown leather belt with holsters for thimble-size coffee cups and a dagger. He is a keeper of customs, Baghdad's professional server of coffee. He sits in a brick house behind an iron gate in the cramped warrens of Sadr City. The room is painted bright lemon in contrast to the gray street outside. His mother walks through the room, half-embarrassed, singing for guests, "I am the mother of the coffee maker. " She thumps her chest and laughs at her son. In Iraq, coffee isn't merely a matter of ordering a grande to go from Starbucks.
NEWS
June 26, 2008 | By Allison Steele and Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two Army officers from South Jersey were killed in separate incidents in Iraq this week. Capt. Gregory T. Dalessio, 30, a Cherry Hill native and a 1996 graduate of Bishop Eustace Prepatory School in Pennsauken, was killed Monday by small arms fire after his patrol came under attack near Baghdad. On Tuesday, Army Maj. Dwayne Kelley, a decorated state police trooper who was born in Willingboro and lived in South Orange, died in the bombing of a Baghdad district council building.
NEWS
May 23, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six thousand miles away from his Northeast Philadelphia home, Army Sgt. Glenn Devitt took comfort in letters, phone cards, and jars of peanut butter sent to him in the Iraqi desert by a group of schoolchildren. Yesterday the soldier, home on leave, went to Forrest School to thank the students for their efforts. "Myself and my guys, we loved your letters," Devitt, 23, told the children. "It brought a little bit of the States to Iraq. " In December, Paul Costello, president of Forrest's Home and School Association, heard from a friend who knew the Devitt family.
NEWS
April 21, 2008 | Daily News wire services
China's anger BEIJING - Fresh anti-Western protests flared in several Chinese cities yesterday as people vented anger over pro-Tibet demonstrations along the Olympic torch relay. State media urged calm. Saber-rattling in Iraq BAGHDAD - Followers of hardline cleric Muqtada al-Sadr raised the stakes yesterday in the showdown with Iraq's government, refusing to disband their militia. The U.S. military said 40 Shiite militants were killed in fierce fighting in southern Iraq.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|