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Safe Passage

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NEWS
September 23, 1998 | For The Inquirer / DAVID M. WARREN
These fowl know where to make their crossings. The three geese were hoping for safe passage yesterday in the parking lot of the Ritz Center, home to shops and the Ritz 12 cinema, in Voorhees.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
I'm probably being too sensitive on this point, but it's hard for us guys to watch "Little Women" and "Safe Passage" without developing an inferiority complex. Especially using Susan Sarandon as a reference point. Sarandon stars in "Little Women" as the mother of four sweet girls. She is tolerant, wise, tranquil and supernaturally fulfilled. The privilege of being a mother to this female quartet transforms her into a beaming saint. In "Safe Passage," Sarandon is the mother of seven boys.
NEWS
April 13, 1986
An April 5 front-page article on the secret deals by the French and Italian governments with Libya and the Palestine Liberation Organization granting safe passage to terrorists quoted the U.S. government as claiming it learned about such agreements as late as "last year. " When I was living in Italy in the late 1970s it was known to everyone with the mildest interest in politics that the Italian authorities, hard pressed by the Red Brigades terrorists, had struck deals. It is quite simply impossible that the U.S. government was unaware of them.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | by Yardena Adar, Los Angeles Daily News
In "Little Women," she has four daughters; in "Safe Passage," seven sons. But Susan Sarandon doesn't believe playing middle-age supermoms means the end of steamy screen roles, rejecting the long-held Hollywood notion that age and motherhood rob women of their sexuality. "I can't believe I'm the only one who's still interested in sex at my age," said Sarandon, 48. "I have to think there's an amazing amount of baby boomers out there - and guys who are not necessarily all going with teen-agers because they're in their 40s, and maybe this could start a trend where there's actually adults with adults.
NEWS
May 5, 2004
The Law of the Sea treaty has a little something for everyone - exploration rights for oil and gas drillers, protection of commercial shipping lanes, safe passage for U.S. troops, environmental provisions to protect habitat and to fight pollution. That's why ocean industries, environmentalists and the Department of Defense all are lobbying the Senate to make the United States the 146th country to ratify the international "constitution" of the sea. Yesterday, an unprecedented alliance in defense of the treaty formed between the World Wildlife Fund and the American Petroleum Institute - groups generally on opposite sides of issues.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Battles between government forces and rebels left more than 140 people dead across Syria on Tuesday, while the brother of the parliament speaker was gunned down in Damascus - the latest victim of a wave of assassinations targeting high-ranking supporters of President Bashar al-Assad. The violence aroused new concern about faltering diplomatic efforts to try to end the conflict. Britain's prime minister offered the latest long-shot suggestion - that Assad could be allowed safe passage out of the country if that would guarantee an end to the fighting.
NEWS
May 14, 2006 | By Christine Ernest FOR THE INQUIRER
A fist-size turtle rested on a bank just a few feet from the dam at Historic Smithville Park. It slowly traveled away from the drying mud and into the woods, saving itself from the obstacle in its path. But that same dam serves as an access point for humans on the Rancocas Canoe Trail. Providing a safe passage for canoes and kayaks along the Rancocas Creek is exactly what Burlington County wanted to offer. It decided to focus on the canoe trail to provide recreational water access to residents, and to raise awareness of the Rancocas Creek, its watershed and its inhabitants.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For nearly four years, six residents and Mantua Township have been arguing over who is responsible for rebuilding Boody Mill Road and the collapsed dam on which it used to sit. So, it was not surprising that attorneys for both sides yesterday interpreted a judge's decision on the matter as advantageous to them. In fact, the only thing the attorneys agreed on is that what used to be Boody Mill Lake remains dry - its condition since a heavy rain on July 5, 1989, collapsed the dam and washed away the public road.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Armed only with whistle and voice, parent volunteers patrol the 12-block radius around Rhodes Middle, Whittier and Allen elementaries to see children safely to school and back each day. They're part of the school district's Safe Corridor Program, protecting kids from fights, strangers and fast cars in their North Philadelphia neighborhood. To date, they've done it without a way to communicate with each other, or the school. Motorola yesterday donated 16 walkie-talkies to Rhodes Middle and four other Safe Corridor schools, linking volunteers such as James Dudley and Kay Toland to each other and to a base station, which can contact police if necessary.
SPORTS
June 6, 1993 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Efforts to return the American shad to its historic spawning grounds in the Susquehanna River and its tributaries took another step forward last week. Three utilities signed an agreement with Pennsylvania and Maryland that requires the companies to build fish lifts at three hydro-electric dams on the lower end of the river - Holtwood, Safe Harbor and York Haven. The lifts at Holtwood and Safe Harbor are to be completed in time for the spring 1997 migration. The York Haven lift must be in service by the year 2000.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 16, 2015
I DO IMMIGRATION law, and a good part of my practice involves asylum and refugee work. For the past 20 years, I've helped beleaguered aliens obtain protection and safe haven in the United States. I've seen it all: Religious, political, social and ethnic persecution, and it's been one of the most rewarding aspects of my job to help a deserving individual establish a new life in this beautiful country. So when I heard that the Democratic National Committee had chosen Philadelphia as the site of the 2016 presidential convention, my first thought was: "Oh, the humanity!"
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the recent widening of a major South Jersey shore route, small endangered critters in the area faced a new danger. They would have to dodge yet another lane of rumbling trucks, buses, and cars, seemingly charging at the wildlife, in the middle of a pristine wildlife preserve. But a novel program, often found out West, is helping the animals safely cross the Atlantic City Expressway, a corridor used by roughly 53 million travelers a year. Fences are guiding them away from the highway and into four culverts beneath it. To gauge the program's success, the state Department of Environmental Protection plans to install motion-triggered cameras next month to see if endangered tree frogs, rare northern pine snakes, and the more common foxes, raccoons, and opossums are using the passageways located near the Frank S. Farley Rest Stop in Hammonton.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN, Washington Post
THE PROTAGONIST of "Lore," a powerful and haunting drama set in Germany immediately following the country's defeat in World War II, is a teenage girl. Subtly played by Saskia Rosendahl, Lore (pronounced "Laura") is just old enough to have learned to fear and hate Jews. It's a sick lesson imparted to her by her Nazi parents (Hans-Jochen Wagner and Ursina Lardi) who, as the film gets under way, are being taken into custody by Allied troops. This leaves Lore the rest of the film to begin to unlearn that lesson, and maybe to pick up a few new ones, as she and her four younger siblings, who are still relatively untainted by anti-Semitism, make their way through the Black Forest to a relative's house near Hamburg.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard J. Kerrigan Sr., 101, of Collingdale, a bartender who could find the fun in most any situation, died Thursday, Feb. 28, of cancer at Prospect Park Health & Rehab, where he had lived for six years. Just days before his death, Mr. Kerrigan was needling the rehab staff with jokes. More than a year earlier, on his 100th birthday, he had greeted partygoers by name and then announced: "Can I go to bed now?" "He never had a bad day in his life," said Michael Masi, who is married to Mr. Kerrigan's granddaughter Bernadette.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - The bravado sounded familiar. Like the leaders of other countries swept away by Arab Spring uprisings, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad vowed to never be forced into exile and to die in his homeland. Assad dug in his heels even as world powers move to boost the opposition in Syria's civil war - the latest turn in a nearly 20-month-old crisis so overwhelming that even the Red Cross says it can no longer cope. "I am not a puppet, I was not made by the West for me to go to the West or any other country," Assad said in an interview with Russia Today, which posted excerpts Thursday on its website.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Battles between government forces and rebels left more than 140 people dead across Syria on Tuesday, while the brother of the parliament speaker was gunned down in Damascus - the latest victim of a wave of assassinations targeting high-ranking supporters of President Bashar al-Assad. The violence aroused new concern about faltering diplomatic efforts to try to end the conflict. Britain's prime minister offered the latest long-shot suggestion - that Assad could be allowed safe passage out of the country if that would guarantee an end to the fighting.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Jeffrey Lee
In September 2007, I walked into the halls of Thomas FitzSimons High School. This was my first teaching assignment, at an all-male, African American neighborhood school, the only one of its kind in the city. No one is walking into the halls of my school this September. Five years later, "Fitz," as we affectionately called it, has been closed. What remains for me are memories of the students who came through my classroom door and changed the way I think about education in America.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By David Enders, McClatchy Newspapers
BEIRUT - Syrian Arab Red Crescent workers rescued some wounded civilians Friday from the hard-hit Baba Amr neighborhood of the city of Homs as representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Syrian government negotiated a cease-fire that would allow still larger evacuations. The barrage of mortar and rocket fire that had rained down on the neighborhood came to a halt apparently for the first time in three weeks as the negotiations took place. Two journalists wounded Wednesday in a hail of fire that killed two of their colleagues were apparently not among seven women and children rescued Friday and taken to a Homs hospital.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage and Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
The demonstrations on the streets of Egypt touched Philadelphia on Monday night, as shaken tourists and students made their way home to this region - or at least out of a country embroiled in protest. Joanne Carmine, a Center City insurance executive with the Ace Group, was on I-95, being driven home by her son in the final leg of a sometimes frightening journey that began amid burned-out buildings in Cairo, took her to Germany, and led at last to Dulles Airport outside Washington. Deen Novelli, a 2010 Temple University graduate who was studying Arabic at the University of Alexandria, arrived in Athens, Greece, after leaving on a State Department flight.
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