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NEWS
November 1, 1998 | By David Cho, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Old Testament prescribed for Israel that every 50th year was to be a year of Jubilee. People could begin their lives over again: Debts were canceled, slaves freed and sinners forgiven. That Scripture is the core message of Jubilee House, a new boarding home for women in crisis pregnancies founded by the Fountain of Life Center, a Pentecostal church. When the home opens in a few weeks, the safe house will be the only facility available in Burlington County for women of all ages in crisis pregnancies.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
When his mother told him she still hadn't found a new place for them to live, Ralph Brooks Jr. told her he had it all figured out. Once he gets out of the hospital, he said, they will move to "a place where they don't shoot. I know where they don't shoot - on a farm," he told his mother, Kimberly, last week. After a discussion of how early farmers get up and how hard they work, Ralph - who hates getting out of bed and conspires like any other 7-year-old to evade responsibility - turned his attention to lunch.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Vernon Loeb and Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Maranuk, a Democratic committeeman from Juniata, the knock on the door came late Monday night. His services as a $20,013-a-year maintenance helper for the Philadelphia Parking Authority were no longer necessary. About the only consolation was that the bearer of bad tidings, a Parking Authority security guard, also had been laid off. "It's a shame to pick on the little guys," said Maranuk, 38. "They said they wanted to save money. There's people making in the 50s up there in Two Penn Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fascinated by sharks? Then sink your jaws into a new exhibit opening at the Academy of Natural Sciences on Feb. 23. Titled "Sharks! Facts and Fantasy," the display will deal with all facets of this feared and fascinating creature. On view will be life-size models of 17 sharks, including the jaws of one that could swallow a Volkswagen, plus fossilized sharks, real shark skin, live embryos and such objects as a hubcap, a horse's skull, a 17th-century French suit of armor and a propeller that were found in the stomachs of tiger sharks.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
L. Lawrence Spaziani said he wasn't sure how to swim that Sunday back in 1925 when he jumped into Valley Creek and sank right to the bottom. Spaziani, now 88, said yesterday that if his buddies hadn't fished him out quickly, he wouldn't be alive. "I nearly drowned," Spaziani said. Soon after, the then-13-year-old "Larry" Spaziani joined what was already becoming a Chester County tradition, the West Chester YMCA, which was then located on High Street in the building that now houses the Chester County Historical Society.
NEWS
June 16, 1998 | by Sally Siebert, For the Daily News
On a recent Friday night, groups of young boys played pool as a nearby boom box played Verve's "Lucky Man. " Across the room, three girls huddled and giggled in private conversation. "It's cool here," said Paula Neal-Mink, 10, as she threw her body face-down into the cushions of bright orange sofa. "There's stuff to do - or not to do - depending on how you feel," she said. The "cool" place where kids are gathering in Moorestown these days is called the Third Floor, a community center for the under-20 set. It's on the third floor of the township's recreation building - which once housed Moorestown High School - on Third Street.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
It was nearly 5 p.m. on a recent weekday and most of the children who came to the South Philadelphia community center for tutoring had gone home. But 9-year-old Hanh Huynh lingered, straightening the desks into neat rows. Frail and soft-spoken, the 4th- grader at Southwark Elementary seemed at ease in the Spartan surroundings of the Vietnamese United National Association of Greater Philadalphia office on 7th Street near McClellan. She and the other children play outside amid broken glass and graffiti.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Blake Morrison, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
D.J. spoke up first, from across the square table where the youngsters sat, shaping green clay. "Why didn't you deck your teacher?" he asked. Matt winced, then scowled. He had just told the group that a teacher had shoved him that day at school. Matt, 12, said he had walked away, but he was still boiling about it. "What would you have rather done?" he asked D.J. "Walk away, or get suspended?" "Well, I would walk away," D.J. said, "but I'd tell someone. " Matt had told someone, his mother.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One spring day in 1992, the man beat his love of three years for seven hours straight. For the vicious attack, he spent five months in jail. Upon his release, he tracked the woman down and intimidated her into moving in with him again. She felt helpless to resist. "I can't get away from this man," the Philadelphia-area woman, who asked not to be identified, said in a telephone interview last week. "I had no protection at all. None at all. " Though the man promised it would be better this time, the psychological abuse quickly began again: the jealous accusations, the questions about her loyalty.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's 8:45 p.m. on a Friday, and Breakers, a teen dance club in Frazer, is packed. The patrons range in age from 14 to 21 years old. Many have either carpooled with friends or been dropped off by a parent. Parents approve of the club, the teenagers say, because it's safe - safer than hanging out unchaperoned in somebody's living room drinking beer or being tempted to have sex. "My mom didn't want me to come here at first. But after she saw the place for herself, she changed her mind.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2016
On April 8, the Community Center at Visitation hosted its Hope Gala at Woodcrest Mansion at Cabrini College. The center in Kensington, one of the 10 poorest districts in the country, provides a safe place for community outreach, education, and recreation. More than 120 attendees, including the center's executive director, Sister Betty Scanlon, came together for a cocktail reception, dinner, and dance presentation by the Vietnamese Fan dancers. The Young Leader Community Service award went to Marc Mater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My twin sister graduated from college last May and began a new - very high-paying - job in January. She's incredibly smart with work and school but doesn't always make the best choices with men. For example, she has been in a relationship with "Jim" for over a year to hear her tell it, but Jim refuses to admit they are dating or even friends. She recently moved about an hour away for her job. She wants him to quit his job and move in with her. They are having sex; she says she loves him and doesn't want to push him to make a formal commitment.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew Lee, 29, a Ph.D. student from the University of Pennsylvania's nursing school, received a Fulbright Scholarship. His research focuses on how video games can be applied to therapeutic use. Lee, a Cerritos, Calif., native, previously was awarded an International Game Developers Association scholarship for his work with video games and mental health. He has eight years of experience in developing games and was trained as a game designer. In 2014, he founded game design studio AFK Studios, which was invited to the 2014 G-20 Global Business Challenge in Australia to talk about how video games could address global challenges with water-related issues.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
GEORGE WAS the first openly gay man I knew. But over the years, I often wondered if the George I knew as a kid was the same man others did, the ones at the other end of a morning cab ride he'd take from my aunt's neighborhood in the Bronx to his job - in banking, I think - somewhere in Manhattan. I'd watch him as he got into the cab, always in a suit, serious and reserved as he folded his huge frame into the back seat and told the driver where to go. At the end of the workday, another cab would drop him off and I'd watch again as he'd disappear into his apartment only to emerge shortly after in the outfit he favored in the summer: jean shorts, a colorful tank top, and chancletas - sandals that punctuated every step as he made his way to my aunt's apartment.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1918, when she was 6, Thelma Davis' father, David, died in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County. Her mother, Harriet, had to send Thelma and her four siblings - from 2 years old to 10 - to live in what is now Mooseheart Child City and School in Illinois. Opened in 1913 by the Moose fraternal organization, "at the time, it was the model place to raise a child" who lacked a parent or a nurturing home, a granddaughter, Kathy Simpkins, said. A relative, James J. Davis, is credited by the organization with the concept, Simpkins said.
NEWS
February 4, 2015
ISSUE | SAFE HOME Hard-hitting spot could save lives During the Super Bowl broadcast, the No More campaign to end domestic violence aired a powerful spot that I'm sure many viewers are still thinking and talking about. For 30 seconds, more than 100 million people were asked to consider what it's like to live in fear in their own home - while far too many members of this same audience knew what it was like from personal experience. Issues of domestic violence have made international headlines at various points throughout the pro football season, but the truth is that these incidents persist as a silent epidemic despite the glare of public scrutiny.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
  TWO DECADES later, Andy Callaghan, a 25-year veteran police sergeant, still can't forget the sound of the bullet whizzing by his ear. It was winter 1995. As he had done dozens - maybe even hundreds - of times, he geared up to serve a warrant, this time in Southwest Philadelphia. He knew that facing gunfire and having to shoot back to stay alive was always a possibility. But he didn't anticipate it that night. "It was a Thursday. I was exhausted from court and work," Callaghan, 48, recalled recently in his office at the Livengrin Foundation for Addiction Recovery campus in Bensalem, where he serves as director of the First Responders Addiction Treatment Program.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Siobhan Reardon's first move as head of the Free Library of Philadelphia in 2008 could have left her permanently vilified in this town. Faced with a 20 percent cut in city funding and a 34 percent drop in state money, she and Mayor Nutter proposed closing 11 libraries, including four historic Carnegie libraries, to bridge the gap. Residents protested and a lawsuit stopped the proposal, which Nutter later called the worst of his tenure....
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia woman pleaded guilty to manslaughter Thursday in the death of her 11-year-old daughter, who was shot by her two-year-old brother. Tiffany Goldwire, 31, of West Philadelphia, had told her older son, a 14-year-old, to put the loaded .357 revolver in a safe place, according to police. Her two-year-old found the handgun under a bed and fatally wounded his sister, Jamara Stevens, in the bedroom as she was texting her friend. Goldwire's attorney, Eugene Tinari, said that because the gun had been cocked, it required little force to pull the trigger.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice.   On sweating every little choice you make with a baby: I have a 6-month-old who is fun but challenging; I didn't get the "easy" baby that my mother told me I'd get. I desperately tried to get right with my totally reasonable decision to wean her at 3 months. My sister told me in the midst of one of my many early anxiety attacks: "All the things that are 'best' for baby are tiny fractions of a percentage point better than the 'second best' things.
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