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Safe Water

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NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
The Washington Township Municipal Utilities Authority has ordered engineer Jim Sickels to either design plants that would remove radium from contaminated Well No. 10 or blend the water from the well with safe water. The township is expected to choose one of the methods by the end of the year, MUA Chairman Val Orsimarsi said. The additional water from that well would be used to accommodate the fast- growing township, Orsimarsi said. The MUA instituted a moratorium on new housing last November because of the water shortage.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Low-interest loans to help homeowners with radium-contaminated wells pay for safe drinking water are now available from the state, officials said yesterday. Homeowners who meet financial eligibility requirements and own wells containing at least 5 picocuries of radium per liter may borrow up to $10,000 to be paid back over five years at 2 percent annual interest. The loan money may be used to connect a home to the local municipal water supply or to buy a home water-treatment system.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Graver Mackison tells it, he didn't go into the water business so much as the water business found him. Born a few hundred yards from the house in which he lives on Main Street in this speck of a Lancaster County village on the Susquehanna River, the adolescent Mackison did odd jobs for the local water company. The firm's piston pump was driven by a windmill then, so when the breeze didn't blow, little Graver had to run up the hill and start the gasoline backup engine. "The owners wanted to pay me 20 cents an hour," said Mackison, 75, "but my father said, 'Fifteen is enough.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
This industrial city gets its tap water from a river that flows sudsy and dark. City plants treat the water, but many people boil it and drink it with trepidation. As China gallops toward the modern era, access to safe and clean drinking water is beyond the reach of hundreds of millions of rural and urban people. Chemical spills, rampant pollution, and poor stewardship of the land have tainted much of the nation's water supply, and the groundwater under 90 percent of China's cities is contaminated.
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
At the first citywide roundtable on schools, students outlined a litany of problems: a lack of resources, cuts to art and music programs, violence inside and outside some schools, and a systemwide lack of access to clean, safe drinking water. "We come from different schools, but we share the same issues," Morgan Bacon, a student at Masterman High School, told city officials and School Reform Commission Chair Marjorie Neff during the session in City Hall. The event, which was organized by several City Council members and Mayor Kenney's Office of Education, drew dozens of students from individual schools, as well as those involved with activist organizations such as the Philadelphia Student Union and Youth United for Change.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | By John Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Homeowners in South Jersey who draw water from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer should consider having their drinking water tested for radium, state Department of Environmental Protection officials said at a news conference yesterday. But possible radium contamination in the wells poses no immediate health hazard, said Barker Hamill, the chief of the state's Bureau of Safe Water. The recommendation follows a U.S. Geological Survey study in 1988 and 1989 that found radium above the federal standard in one-third of wells sampled in Atlantic, Camden, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem Counties.
NEWS
May 7, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Is Philly's drinking water healthy? Basically yes, for most people, the city and clean-water activists agree. But a new city report touting Philadelphia water as "safe and healthy to drink" drew fire yesterday from Clean Water Action. The group said the Water Department should have placed more emphasis on possible risks for people with weak immune systems, such as patients on chemotherapy or with HIV. While the report's cover hails the water's safety in large type, "what people won't see is the statement buried deep in the report that this isn't necessarily true for all water drinkers," said Gabrielle Giddings, of the clean-water group.
NEWS
November 3, 1986
This is to request that The Inquirer correct a factual error contained in the Oct. 30 editorial "Clean Water Act deserves the President's signature. " Your editorial correctly points out the urgent need for the President to sign the Clean Water Act. As a legislator who has spent a great deal of time and effort on water issues, I welcome The Inquirer's attempt to focus public attention on this area. However, you are factually incorrect in charging me - along with my colleagues Congressmen Bob Roe and Jim Howard - with "silence" in regard to the need to urge President Reagan to sign the Clean Water Act. Less than two weeks ago, I joined Congressmen Roe and Howard in sending a bipartisan letter to the White House, urging the President to sign this important legislation into law. We pointed out that the act is critically important to preserving and improving the quality of our nation's waters, and to achieving an orderly phase-out of the Clean Water Act's Construction Grants Program - one of the largest public works programs in our history.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | By Deidre D. Foster, Special to The Inquirer
Washington Township Mayor Gerald Luongo received plenty of feedback last Wednesday from the few residents who attended his third bimonthly "Face-to- Face With the Mayor" meeting. Five residents showed up to complain about a Municipal Utilities Authority proposal to extend township water lines onto their street. The residents, who live on Mango Court near Johnson Road, use well water and said they do not want to pay plumbing and hookup fees for the lines. The extension would affect about 48 homes.
LIVING
December 14, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For health or just for cachet, Americans are increasingly turning to bottled water. In 1997, 3.25 billion gallons of bottled water were consumed in the United States, up 10 percent from the year before, according to the Beverage Marketing Corp., an industry research and consulting firm. Since 1987, bottled water consumption has more than doubled. "Bottled water is used as a substitute for tap water," said Gary Hemphill of Beverage Marketing. "Either people don't like the taste of their tap water, or they don't think the quality is great.
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NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
At the first citywide roundtable on schools, students outlined a litany of problems: a lack of resources, cuts to art and music programs, violence inside and outside some schools, and a systemwide lack of access to clean, safe drinking water. "We come from different schools, but we share the same issues," Morgan Bacon, a student at Masterman High School, told city officials and School Reform Commission Chair Marjorie Neff during the session in City Hall. The event, which was organized by several City Council members and Mayor Kenney's Office of Education, drew dozens of students from individual schools, as well as those involved with activist organizations such as the Philadelphia Student Union and Youth United for Change.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Joseph M. Manko In recent weeks, the issue of safe drinking water has been unusually conspicuous, thanks to headlines emanating from Flint, Mich., and elsewhere. Philadelphians have good reason to be proud of their city's robust tradition of watershed protection and commitment to providing safe, top-quality drinking water. That commitment was first made 200 years ago, when the city's government, business, and community leaders decided on an innovative plan to create a public waterworks system that would guarantee safe drinking water for the citizens of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT WORTH, Texas - In parched West Texas, it's often easier to drill for oil than to find new sources of water. So after years of diminishing water supplies made even worse by the second-most severe drought in state history, some communities are resorting to a plan that might have seemed absurd a generation ago: turning sewage into drinking water. Construction recently began on a $13 million water-reclamation plant believed to be the first in Texas. Officials have worked to dispel any fears that people will be drinking their neighbors' urine, promising that the system will yield clean, safe water.
NEWS
February 9, 2009 | By PHIL GOLDSMITH
MAYOR NUTTER, as he reminds us on the other side of this page, has been visiting barbershops and beauty parlors to solicit ideas on how to cope with rapidly shrinking city revenues. And another round of citizen-engagement forums (see box) is also about to get under way. It's commendable that the administration is engaging the public, whether it is someone getting a shave or at a neighborhood kaffeeklatsch. But for these sessions to be worthwhile, it's important that the right questions be asked.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
This industrial city gets its tap water from a river that flows sudsy and dark. City plants treat the water, but many people boil it and drink it with trepidation. As China gallops toward the modern era, access to safe and clean drinking water is beyond the reach of hundreds of millions of rural and urban people. Chemical spills, rampant pollution, and poor stewardship of the land have tainted much of the nation's water supply, and the groundwater under 90 percent of China's cities is contaminated.
NEWS
May 7, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Is Philly's drinking water healthy? Basically yes, for most people, the city and clean-water activists agree. But a new city report touting Philadelphia water as "safe and healthy to drink" drew fire yesterday from Clean Water Action. The group said the Water Department should have placed more emphasis on possible risks for people with weak immune systems, such as patients on chemotherapy or with HIV. While the report's cover hails the water's safety in large type, "what people won't see is the statement buried deep in the report that this isn't necessarily true for all water drinkers," said Gabrielle Giddings, of the clean-water group.
LIVING
December 14, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For health or just for cachet, Americans are increasingly turning to bottled water. In 1997, 3.25 billion gallons of bottled water were consumed in the United States, up 10 percent from the year before, according to the Beverage Marketing Corp., an industry research and consulting firm. Since 1987, bottled water consumption has more than doubled. "Bottled water is used as a substitute for tap water," said Gary Hemphill of Beverage Marketing. "Either people don't like the taste of their tap water, or they don't think the quality is great.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Waldo, the stranded right whale that has captured the hearts and attention of Philadelphians and scientists, was nearing the Atlantic Ocean yesterday - closer than it has ever been to freedom and safety. But even as the whale tarried near the Delaware Bay, scientists unveiled dramatic rescue plans involving a 60-foot nose net and possibly a water stretcher. As all who have followed the saga of Waldo the Wrong-Way Right Whale know, this is one very confused critter. It was tantalizingly close to the ocean last Monday but then turned back north, at one point nearly dying in shallow water.
NEWS
November 5, 1994
POLLUTION BEGINS AT HOME The two main areas in water pollution are ocean pollution and surface water contamination. What we, the population, do not realize is that we are doing it. We are polluting our waters with cleaning products used in our homes and disposed of down our drains and toilets. It then proceeds to leak into our water system. We also are allowing permits for more than 1,800 major industrial facilities to dump in our waters. It is taken for granted that the water will always be clean and available, but what we do not know is that 1.2 billion people do not have safe water.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | By Julia C. Martinez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When thirsty Pennsylvanians opened their taps during the steamy summer of '91, American Water Works opened its pipelines. When Illinois farmers pumped up their irrigation systems, American Water Works moistened their dry crops. And when Arizona parks filled up their public swimming holes, American Water Works soaked the fun spots. All through the summer, revenues at American Water Works Co. Inc. gushed. The Voorhees, N.J., holding company is in the business of water - pumping it out of rivers and underground reservoirs, making it potable and delivering it to homes, offices, factories and firehouses.
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