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Safety Hazard

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NEWS
June 16, 1986 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
A request for a special exception to build a house on the corner of Glenwood Road and Barnes Avenue has been opposed by neighbors, who said they feared that the house would obstruct the view of drivers and children riding their bicycles. Barry Frieberg, of the 200 block of Glenwood Road, said Thursday night at an Upper Merion Township Zoning Hearing Board meeting that the proposed two- story house represented a safety hazard to neighborhood children and could lead to more construction in the area.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Harry Castner Jr.'s Christmas light display is a Philadelphia phenomenon - 200,000 lightbulbs, 150 Santas, two nativity scenes. Any decoration you can think of, Castner has it. People come in busloads, some from as far away as California, to see the spectacle on Albert Street near Trenton Avenue in Kensington. City Council commended Castner's family with a proclamation in 1990. However, while visually impressive, the display is a public safety hazard, according to the city's Department of Licenses & Inspections, which ordered the plug pulled on the display yesterday.
NEWS
July 28, 1986 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
A request for a variance to allow the construction of a sign closer to another sign than allowed by law was granted to the Mister Donut franchise on Eagle Road in Haverford by the township zoning hearing board. The board voted 3-0 Thursday night to approve an application submitted by John Weeks, an engineer for Mister Donut of America Inc., to construct an elevated sign. Weeks said the sign would be about 45 feet from signs on abutting properties. Township zoning laws require 100 feet between signs.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The processing plant where an estimated 100,000 pounds of chicken rotted in the summer heat is no longer a public safety hazard, the township and the state Department of Environmental Protection announced yesterday. But despite a successful cleanup, officials said, it might be a long time before any business will want to move into the Meredith Farms site on Route 40. "The building is in poor physical condition to begin with. Then there was the contamination on top of that," said James Manuel of the DEP's Bureau of Emergency Response, who helped coordinate the 26-day cleanup.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Any player thinking about copying Terrell Owens' autograph session should beware: The NFL has sent a memo to all 32 teams warning that carrying foreign objects will bring a 15-yard penalty and possible ejection from the game. Owens created a stir Monday when, following his second touchdown catch in San Francisco's victory over Seattle, he pulled a pen from his sock, signed the ball and handed it to his financial adviser in the front row. Owens was warned, and the only punishment he received was a $5,000 fine for having his jersey untucked.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Commuters beware: Don't stop to smell the flowers. And don't even think about picking them. Motorists along Interstate 95, the Schuylkill Expressway and Route 202 who stop to pick wildflowers along the highways face fines of up to $300 for picking vegetation within a state right-of-way, plus additional fines for stopping along a state highway. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation didn't intend to create a safety hazard when it planted the wildflowers on five acres in the Philadelphia area last year.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
DEAR HARRY: My parents were married for 60 years and raised six children and three grandchildren in our home in North Philly. It was where we all went for a cooked meal, fruit, sweets and love. They saw the good in everyone. The house burned down earlier this year, taking my mother and my great-niece. We hired a contractor to take down the remainder of the house. He did some of the work, then seemed to disappear. I still visualize my mother and the baby standing and crying for help.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
It was a typical springtime scene of suburbia - a backyard barbecue with steaks, corn on the cob and hamburgers on the grill. Then with a sound that Jill Kail likened to a shotgun blast, the window of her new gas grill blew out, showering glass in a five-foot radius on the patio. Kail, who was poised to turn over the meat, jumped back and was not hurt. Kail, a lawyer who lives in Cherry Hill, called the company to report the mishap, and was surprised to learn that officials were aware of the potential problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 43-year-old veteran of the grocery industry. I am also an associate of one of the premier supermarkets in the country, and I disagree with your response to "Chicago Clipper"! Coupons are a necessary evil and are graciously accepted, but they create work for retailers. It takes countless hours of sorting, logging, filling out forms, mailing and receiving to be reimbursed for the face value of the coupon. This is hardly a benefit to the grocer. The abuse and fraud associated with coupons adds up into millions of dollars.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An environmental activists' group filed a federal lawsuit Friday against the organizers of a live-pigeon shoot in Bucks County, alleging that the activity pollutes the Delaware River. The Delaware Riverkeeper Network and its head, Maya K. van Rossum, filed suit in federal court in Philadelphia against the Philadelphia Gun Club, which is located in Bensalem. Their complaint alleges that the pigeon shoots, which occur many times a year, pollute the Delaware with lead shot and fragments, as well as dead and injured birds.
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NEWS
November 2, 2012
DEAR HARRY: My parents were married for 60 years and raised six children and three grandchildren in our home in North Philly. It was where we all went for a cooked meal, fruit, sweets and love. They saw the good in everyone. The house burned down earlier this year, taking my mother and my great-niece. We hired a contractor to take down the remainder of the house. He did some of the work, then seemed to disappear. I still visualize my mother and the baby standing and crying for help.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 43-year-old veteran of the grocery industry. I am also an associate of one of the premier supermarkets in the country, and I disagree with your response to "Chicago Clipper"! Coupons are a necessary evil and are graciously accepted, but they create work for retailers. It takes countless hours of sorting, logging, filling out forms, mailing and receiving to be reimbursed for the face value of the coupon. This is hardly a benefit to the grocer. The abuse and fraud associated with coupons adds up into millions of dollars.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An environmental activists' group filed a federal lawsuit Friday against the organizers of a live-pigeon shoot in Bucks County, alleging that the activity pollutes the Delaware River. The Delaware Riverkeeper Network and its head, Maya K. van Rossum, filed suit in federal court in Philadelphia against the Philadelphia Gun Club, which is located in Bensalem. Their complaint alleges that the pigeon shoots, which occur many times a year, pollute the Delaware with lead shot and fragments, as well as dead and injured birds.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the mostly cloudy night of Nov. 14, US Airways Flight 257 was climbing at 3,000 feet from Philadelphia on a five-hour trip to Phoenix when a green laser wielded on the ground illuminated the plane, posing a safety risk to the passengers and crew. One night earlier, on Nov. 13, the same Phoenix-bound US Airways Flight 257 was struck by a laser beam, also at 3,000 feet and in the same vicinity, five miles west of Philadelphia International Airport. Handheld lasers - readily available for a few bucks on the Internet as classroom and astronomy pointing aids - have become a big safety issue to pilots.
SPORTS
October 19, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Any player thinking about copying Terrell Owens' autograph session should beware: The NFL has sent a memo to all 32 teams warning that carrying foreign objects will bring a 15-yard penalty and possible ejection from the game. Owens created a stir Monday when, following his second touchdown catch in San Francisco's victory over Seattle, he pulled a pen from his sock, signed the ball and handed it to his financial adviser in the front row. Owens was warned, and the only punishment he received was a $5,000 fine for having his jersey untucked.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The processing plant where an estimated 100,000 pounds of chicken rotted in the summer heat is no longer a public safety hazard, the township and the state Department of Environmental Protection announced yesterday. But despite a successful cleanup, officials said, it might be a long time before any business will want to move into the Meredith Farms site on Route 40. "The building is in poor physical condition to begin with. Then there was the contamination on top of that," said James Manuel of the DEP's Bureau of Emergency Response, who helped coordinate the 26-day cleanup.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It wasn't just the stench. It was the 100,000 pounds of rotten chicken meat and the huge pool of chicken blood, not to mention what an official called "billions" of flies and maggots, that prompted officials in Franklin Township this week to declare a chicken-processing plant a public-safety hazard. The Meredith Farms Corp. let its inventory rot for more than a month after it closed its plant on Route 40, Sgt. Joe Olsen, Franklin's emergency management health coordinator, said yesterday.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Harry Castner Jr.'s Christmas light display is a Philadelphia phenomenon - 200,000 lightbulbs, 150 Santas, two nativity scenes. Any decoration you can think of, Castner has it. People come in busloads, some from as far away as California, to see the spectacle on Albert Street near Trenton Avenue in Kensington. City Council commended Castner's family with a proclamation in 1990. However, while visually impressive, the display is a public safety hazard, according to the city's Department of Licenses & Inspections, which ordered the plug pulled on the display yesterday.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The human resources manager paced nervously as the minutes ticked away and the two inspectors quietly read through a stack of injury and illness reports. It was the beginning of what was to be a long day at Dunwoody Village, a nursing home in Newtown Square, Delaware County. The manager in charge of the laundry room was next. Are the carts so deep that employees might injure their backs while removing laundry? Do employees wear protective clothing when dealing with soiled laundry?
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | by Joseph R. Daughen and Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writers
Bucks County District Attorney Alan Rubenstein has retained noted Philadelphia lawyer Richard A. Sprague to sue the county commissioners if they fail to correct what he says are "dangerous" working conditions in his Doylestown office. "Their own fire marshal has for years declared this office to be a fire hazard that is unsafe and disgraceful," said Rubenstein, who has been DA for 13 years. "The conditions are positively deplorable. There are wires dangling all over. A woman was injured tripping over a box because there wasn't enough space for her to go around it. " County officials say they've been planning to renovate Rubenstein's crowded office.
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