CollectionsSafety Valve
IN THE NEWS

Safety Valve

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | BY MAURA CASEY
President Clinton has been asleep at the switch regarding the nuclear industry. With more than half of his term completed, Clinton has never filled all five seats on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. If he had continued to do nothing, only one commissioner would have been left in July to make policy decisions for the industry. The commission is under a lot of pressure from the nuclear industry to back off on regulation. Oil prices have been low for a decade, keeping utility prices low. The nuclear industry is hard-pressed to stay competitive and still meet all the rules required to guarantee the safety of the plants and public.
SPORTS
February 2, 1998 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Brendan Stover isn't scoring much - he is averaging just over seven points per game - but the 6-foot-4 junior center has been an integral part of a Garnet Valley team that has charged to the top of the Southern Chester County League boys' basketball standings. Stover is a rebounding and defensive presence. That is what Jaguars coach Stan Shepanski expected from him going into the season, and the first-year starter hasn't disappointed. "He's our safety valve," Shepanski said.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | By Lea Sitton, Suzanne Sataline and Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An accidental release of gases from the Sun Co. refinery on Passyunk Avenue sent about 30 people to area hospitals yesterday for treatment of dizziness, weakness, nausea and headaches, officials said. Sun Co. officials said the release was believed to have come from a safety valve triggered by an obstruction in refinery piping. Such a backup can cause the venting of noxious gases - including methane, butane, propane and hydrogen sulfide - into the atmosphere. "While at this point in time I can't guarantee we're 100 percent responsible, there are a number of people getting sick," Mike Ruffner, manager of the Philadelphia plant, said during an afternoon news conference.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chemical vapors escaped from a tank at a Pemberton Township chemical company yesterday, sending seven people to hospitals and forcing 50 residents from their homes temporarily. Classes for approximately 2,500 students at three schools were canceled for the day. Evan Kline, the Burlington County fire marshal, said the leak occurred at 12:14 a.m. at the Sybron Chemical Division of Sybron Corp. on Birmingham Road, in the western section of Pemberton Township. He identified the chemical as ethyl acrylate.
NEWS
May 19, 2007
We're all the same I am always saddened when I hear people denigrate and insult minorities and immigrants with hateful language. I had the good fortune of spending a major part of my 35-year career in the chemical business in the international realm. I have visited 65 countries and have done business on all five continents. What I found through this very broad experience is that, once you scratch through the cultural "veneer," all people are fundamentally the same. That is to say that they yearn for the same things for their families and children and that most people everywhere are fundamentally kind and good.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someone devised a primitive fire bomb in an apparent attempt to torch Oreland Sheet Metal Co., a manufacturing plant, over the weekend. The would-be arsonist or arsonists hurled a 5-gallon can containing gasoline through a window and tossed burning shreds of cardboard in after it. When flames did not rise, police said yesterday, a pack of matches was lighted and flung through the window, seven feet off the ground. Still, the gas in the can - capped closed with a safety valve - did not burn.
NEWS
April 20, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
That's Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui pictured above right, wielding a hammer in a pose obviously modeled on the vengeful central character in South Korean director Park Chan-wook's disturbing 2003 film, Oldboy. The film received a four-star review from Roger Ebert and won a jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival (and was featured at the 2005 Philadelphia Film Festival). It is about a man imprisoned in solitary confinement for 15 years who, once freed, goes on a bloody rampage mowing down his captors.
SPORTS
December 27, 1993 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a season that has been one long surprise, it figured that Michael Young would score his first touchdown as an Eagle when he wasn't even expecting to touch the ball. That's what happened at Veterans Stadium yesterday, in the second quarter of the Eagles' 37-26 conquest of the Saints. Moments after the Eagles had gotten onto the scoreboard with a safety, they reached a third-and-16 at the New Orleans' 49-yard line. Young took off on a deep crossing route, expecting quarterback Bubby Brister to be blitzed and have to unload the ball quickly to a safety valve.
SPORTS
November 28, 1997 | By T.J. Furman, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the Morrisville High football playbook, fullback Juan Jones is the last option on the play 33 Michigan. So it was fitting that Jones went 67 yards for the winning touchdown in a 20-18 victory over Bristol yesterday, because the Bulldogs were out of options. "It's nice to have a 1,500-yard gainer back there as your safety valve," Morrisville coach Hank DeGeorge said. Jones took a pass from Bill Jacobs in the right flat and went the distance down the right sideline to give the Bulldogs (6-5)
SPORTS
November 30, 1992 | By Dave Caldwell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles tried really, really hard not to criticize those seven men in striped shirts. They tried really, really hard not to whine about how the officials' spot of the ball in the final minute had cost them a chance to rally past the San Francisco 49ers. They tried really, really hard to be good troupers and keep their mouths shut. But you know the Eagles. They just can't help themselves. With 35 seconds left in the game and the Eagles trailing, 20-14, Randall Cunningham threw a fourth-down, 14-yard pass to Calvin Williams just inches outside the San Francisco 10-yard line.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 2010
IT'S NO SURPRISE that Gov. Ed wants to go out with a billion-dollar bang. Borrowing double the largest amount of money of any exiting governor in state history to pay for an array of state projects is Eddie being Eddie. But while bond issuances regularly are rubber-stamped by the auditor general and/or the treasurer, Ed's current $1 billion baby is stuck - and rightly so. Not that borrowing's always bad. It's done two or three times a year for stuff such as bridge repair, improvements to universities, aid to museums and the arts, and sometimes-questionable private redevelopment projects.
SPORTS
December 13, 2007 | By ANDY FRIEDLANDER For the Daily News
The initials of the most consistent offensive weapon for the Dallas Cowboys this season aren't T.O. Tight end Jason Witten has become a go-to guy for quarterback Tony Romo. The 6-foot-5, 266-pounder is a deep threat, safety valve and heavy-duty blocker, a combination that has resulted in a team-high 80 receptions, 955 yards and seven touchdowns. Against Detroit last Sunday, Witten set career highs with 15 catches for 138 yards. His seven touchdown catches this season is a career best, and he is close in receptions and yardage.
NEWS
May 19, 2007
We're all the same I am always saddened when I hear people denigrate and insult minorities and immigrants with hateful language. I had the good fortune of spending a major part of my 35-year career in the chemical business in the international realm. I have visited 65 countries and have done business on all five continents. What I found through this very broad experience is that, once you scratch through the cultural "veneer," all people are fundamentally the same. That is to say that they yearn for the same things for their families and children and that most people everywhere are fundamentally kind and good.
NEWS
April 20, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
That's Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui pictured above right, wielding a hammer in a pose obviously modeled on the vengeful central character in South Korean director Park Chan-wook's disturbing 2003 film, Oldboy. The film received a four-star review from Roger Ebert and won a jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival (and was featured at the 2005 Philadelphia Film Festival). It is about a man imprisoned in solitary confinement for 15 years who, once freed, goes on a bloody rampage mowing down his captors.
SPORTS
February 2, 1998 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Brendan Stover isn't scoring much - he is averaging just over seven points per game - but the 6-foot-4 junior center has been an integral part of a Garnet Valley team that has charged to the top of the Southern Chester County League boys' basketball standings. Stover is a rebounding and defensive presence. That is what Jaguars coach Stan Shepanski expected from him going into the season, and the first-year starter hasn't disappointed. "He's our safety valve," Shepanski said.
SPORTS
November 28, 1997 | By T.J. Furman, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the Morrisville High football playbook, fullback Juan Jones is the last option on the play 33 Michigan. So it was fitting that Jones went 67 yards for the winning touchdown in a 20-18 victory over Bristol yesterday, because the Bulldogs were out of options. "It's nice to have a 1,500-yard gainer back there as your safety valve," Morrisville coach Hank DeGeorge said. Jones took a pass from Bill Jacobs in the right flat and went the distance down the right sideline to give the Bulldogs (6-5)
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someone devised a primitive fire bomb in an apparent attempt to torch Oreland Sheet Metal Co., a manufacturing plant, over the weekend. The would-be arsonist or arsonists hurled a 5-gallon can containing gasoline through a window and tossed burning shreds of cardboard in after it. When flames did not rise, police said yesterday, a pack of matches was lighted and flung through the window, seven feet off the ground. Still, the gas in the can - capped closed with a safety valve - did not burn.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | By Lea Sitton, Suzanne Sataline and Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An accidental release of gases from the Sun Co. refinery on Passyunk Avenue sent about 30 people to area hospitals yesterday for treatment of dizziness, weakness, nausea and headaches, officials said. Sun Co. officials said the release was believed to have come from a safety valve triggered by an obstruction in refinery piping. Such a backup can cause the venting of noxious gases - including methane, butane, propane and hydrogen sulfide - into the atmosphere. "While at this point in time I can't guarantee we're 100 percent responsible, there are a number of people getting sick," Mike Ruffner, manager of the Philadelphia plant, said during an afternoon news conference.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | BY MAURA CASEY
President Clinton has been asleep at the switch regarding the nuclear industry. With more than half of his term completed, Clinton has never filled all five seats on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. If he had continued to do nothing, only one commissioner would have been left in July to make policy decisions for the industry. The commission is under a lot of pressure from the nuclear industry to back off on regulation. Oil prices have been low for a decade, keeping utility prices low. The nuclear industry is hard-pressed to stay competitive and still meet all the rules required to guarantee the safety of the plants and public.
SPORTS
December 27, 1993 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a season that has been one long surprise, it figured that Michael Young would score his first touchdown as an Eagle when he wasn't even expecting to touch the ball. That's what happened at Veterans Stadium yesterday, in the second quarter of the Eagles' 37-26 conquest of the Saints. Moments after the Eagles had gotten onto the scoreboard with a safety, they reached a third-and-16 at the New Orleans' 49-yard line. Young took off on a deep crossing route, expecting quarterback Bubby Brister to be blitzed and have to unload the ball quickly to a safety valve.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|