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Sailing

NEWS
October 5, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a mismatch that, any knowledgeable seafarer might conclude, could have sent the entire Ciszek family of Seattle, Wash., to their deaths in the dark in 40 feet of Delaware River water. Their sailing vessel, Unicorn of Saint Helier - at 115 feet about the size of Columbus's flagship Santa Maria - collided at 9:45 p.m. Tuesday with a 639- foot tanker ship three miles south of the nuclear power station in Salem County, N.J. The impact snapped off a 32-foot wooden bowsprit as if it were a matchstick.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
They may have the same first word, but that's where the similarities end for this week's two big video releases. One is a taut thriller, the other a saggy mess. DEAD CALM (1989) (Warner) $89.95. 96 minutes. 1/2 Sam Neill, Nicole Kidman, Billy Zane. The most ferocious deep-sea terrorfest since the original Jaws, about a wide-eyed psycho who scrambles aboard an Australian couple's sailing ship and proceeds to make their life a living hell. Chicago actor Zane offers an edgy, explosive performance as the unwelcome guest.
SPORTS
June 28, 2012 | By Chad Graff, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, Jonathan Wright is far removed from the coast of Australia, where he once spent hours, if not entire days, on the water as part of the most renowned American sailing team in history. Today, his work is no less time-consuming and arguably equally instrumental. The 66-year-old serves as the Vanderstar Chair at the United States Naval Academy, overseeing the quality and safety of all sailing vessels. Wright, who grew up in Chestnut Hill, supervises trips in which 80 midshipmen squeeze onto a 45-foot vessel, in part to complete the academy's requirement that all graduates know how to sail.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | LAURENCE KESTERSON / Inquirer Suburban Staff
With overcast skies and mild temperatures, there was not much business for sailing instructor Bryan Tomiak yesterday. Tomiak works at Marsh Creek State Park near Downingtown.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Dennis Berry said to his three kids a few years ago: "Which one of you wants this?" By "this," the longtime West Chester resident meant a home-based business that was more like a hobby - one that his children and friends had regularly razzed him about. In his spare time for more than 10 years, the chemical-industry career man had been selling monocles. Yes, monocles. Eyewear that fell out of fashion in the 1930s, only to be revived by the likes of Colonel Klink in Hogan's Heroes and an advertising mascot, Mr. Peanut.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
During almost three decades at sea, Anne Sirna and Antonia Ritchie have weathered storms, freeloading friends and husbands who turn into Captain Blighs the minute they board their own boats. In their years afloat, they've learned that life offshore consists of food, sleep, standing watch and trying not to go below to use the head. And they can recite by heart the first law of sailing: Never go anywhere on a boat until you have learned how to get yourself back to dry land. These and other humorous observations about life on the high seas can be found in Sirna and Ritchie's new book, ChapWoman's Guide to Shemanship and Pilot Handling.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | Inquirer Photos by Marty O'Grady
Who says you need to get wet to go sailing? With small, radio-controlled sailboats, a radio receiver allows steering from the shore. Hobbyists build the models and race them from May through November with the Mid-Atlantic Model Boat Club. The 25-member club sails boats on weekends at Laurel Acres Park in Mount Laurel. Boats range from 39 inches to more than 6 feet long.
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
Philadelphia's Gazela, the world's oldest and largest wooden squared-rigged sailing vessel still in operation, is now in the care of Caddell's Drydock in Staten Island, N.Y. Since last month, workers have been renovating the underside and working on the propeller and rudder. The Philadelphia Ship Preservation Guild, which operates the vessel for the Penn's Landing Corp., said donations are needed to help pay for the work, estimated to total $50,000.
SPORTS
May 5, 1996 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Don Cohan ambles along the large, wooden dock, his floppy hat riding atop a smiling, open face, other sailors look up from their sanding and fitting work to wish him an honest good morning. The others are young and trim, with stomachs as flat as the transoms of their racing yachts. They are men with a purpose, fine-tuning their boats for the U.S. Olympic selection trials taking place on the roiling ocean waters of Wassaw Sound this week. At the age of 66, listing slightly to portly, Cohan doesn't appear much of a threat to their ambitions.
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