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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1987 | By Robert Weiss, Special to The Inquirer
Life at sea will drop anchor at Penn's Landing this weekend. Sea chanteys and tall tales from salty sailor types, dance groups, a contest of liars, seafood dishes from local restaurants, the commissioning of a Navy cruiser and a symphony of fireworks and orchestras on both sides of the Delaware River will be among the highlights of Maritime America - part of the We the People 200 celebration. The three-day event honoring the mariner's role in America's history will run today from 5 to 10 p.m. and continue from noon to 10 p.m. tomorrow and from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
The district attorney's office yesterday lifted the legal anchor from the backs of two Virginia sailors arrested May 22 after police discovered them firing handguns at tin cans in an isolated area near International Airport. Charges against Robin Frye, 22, of Madison, and Raymond Collins, 25, of Richmond, were withdrawn after their attorney, William Heiman, noted that the men "were not aware that there was a city ordinance against target practice. " Both sailors are assigned to the U.S. Independence, currently being overhauled at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
Ed Skomorucha was taking off his slippers late last Friday night and getting ready to go to bed when the phone rang. What he heard next caught him completely by surprise and kept him busy for the next week. "We're sorry to bother you, sir, but we're in trouble," someone said in Polish. "If you speak Polish, we're at the Ramada Inn, and we need help. " "I got dressed and told my wife I was going to the Ramada," said Skomorucha, 70, a retired appliance dealer and a prominent member of Wilmington's Polish community.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia lawyer who tried unsuccessfully last October to save a ship-jumping Ukrainian sailor from being returned to the Soviet Union has filed another legal action against the federal government, claiming it routinely ignores sailors' requests for asylum. Andrew Fylypovych, attorney for the Ukrainian-American Bar Association, filed a U.S. District Court complaint in Washington, D.C., asking for an injunction to prevent the practice and give asylum-seeking sailors attorneys.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Five U.S. sailors injured in a fire that killed six crewmen aboard a combat supply ship were in stable condition, a U.S. military hospital spokeswoman said today. "They are all expected to make a full recovery," Capt. Donna Eggleston said by telephone. The fire apparently was caused by a fuel oil leak in the engine room of the USS White Plains yesterday. "We don't know how it ignited," a U.S. Navy spokeswoman said in Washington. The vessel was being towed to Subic naval station, a U.S. ship repair facility 50 miles northwest of Manila.
NEWS
May 25, 1987
Two sharply contrasting images of patriotism haunt Memorial Day 1987. One is of black-bag patriots testifying before the congressional committee investigating the Iran-contra scandal. The other is of 37 sailors killed in the Iraqi missile attack on the American frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf. About the latter group our vision is clear. They died in the line of duty. It matters not that the Stark was on a peaceful patrol or that the attack has been described as a tragic mistake.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was barely up when the sailors of the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk began hustling to their battle stations. From the steamy, ovenlike bowels of the great ship to the breezy control tower 14 stories above, hundreds of crewmen were armed to the teeth, ready for action. Their weapons: cutting torches, metal grinders, hand tools, and paint brushes and rollers. Their enemies: time, rust and corrosion. Everywhere, the USS Kitty Hawk was laid open, as if undergoing surgery.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The three merchant sailors sat in the federal courtroom in Philadelphia yesterday and listened with the help of interpreters. Their eyes widened as a representative of their ship's owners said they should walk the proverbial plank by spending more time in an American prison for joining with five other crewmen and five officers of the Olivia to smuggle 51 refugees out of Brazil for a profit. "My client is concerned about the example or message we will be sending back to Brazil," attorney Lisa Reeves, a local lawyer representing Netumar Line Corp.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bjarne E. Pettersen, 73, a retired baker who aided thousands of Norwegian and Swedish sailors in Philadelphia over more than 40 years, died of cancer Saturday at his home in Lansdowne. A native of Hvaler Island, Norway, Mr. Pettersen came to the United States in 1951 and was a member and leader at the Norwegian Seamen's Mission in Philadelphia. He arranged bus tours to other cities, shopping sprees, picnics, and entertainment and published a newsletter for Norwegian and Swedish seamen, said his wife of six years, Betty F. Engh Pettersen.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By Alan Sipress and Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Families fearing for their sailor sons in the Persian Gulf waited yesterday for the all-important telephone call or visit - suffocated by fright, paralyzed by a lack of information from a world away. In Dumont, N.J., the family of Christopher Werner DeAngelis, 23, electronics technician second class, received that visit Monday. The two Navy officials who came to the DeAngelis home had few details. But they knew the one fact: Christopher DeAngelis was dead. And so far from home.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THERE WAS something strange about that hair tonic Charlie Zebrowski was splashing on the heads of his fellow sailors aboard the destroyer USS Coughlin. A case of it had been sent to him by a cousin when he learned that Charlie was the ship's unofficial barber, keeping the other sailors trim for inspections. There was something different about the tonic all right. It was booze! An honest mistake? Or his cousin's idea of a good joke? Whatever, Charlie soon became the most popular man on a ship that often saw action in World War II. Even officers stopped into Charlie's makeshift barbershop for a cut - and a sip. There was one thing that Charlie Zebrowski appreciated and that was a good joke.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the signal bridge of the USS Frank E. Evans, Steve Kraus was scanning the ocean about 3 a.m. as the destroyer made a long, sweeping starboard turn through the darkness. The watch was uneventful until - seemingly out of nowhere - the Australian aircraft carrier Melbourne came barreling toward the Evans at 22 knots. Kraus hurried into the ship's signal shack and got on the intercom to warn the pilot house below: "We're going to get hit!" Then came a mighty crash, and the screeching and shrieking of metal.
FOOD
July 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
If preparing dishes in a cramped kitchen sounds daunting, imagine cooking in a small space hundreds of feet below the sea's surface for 170 of your closest friends. For Philadelphia native Petty Officer First Class Christopher Engman, the lead culinary specialist aboard the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Pennsylvania, whipping up macro recipes in a micro kitchen is the norm. Engman, 26, joined the Navy in August 2005 as a junior enlisted sailor after graduating from Abraham Lincoln High School in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coast Guard has called off the search for a sailor missing since Wednesday evening in the Delaware River. Police declined to give the name of the man, 66, who was last seen clutching a cooler to stay afloat during a rainstorm. Coast Guard officials said there were no plans to reactivate the search. The man's 21-foot sailboat was not found during a search that resumed Thursday at 7:30 a.m. and stretched from Neshaminy Park to the Walt Whitman Bridge. Four other people on the boat swam to the Philadelphia Fire Department building on the west bank of the river and called 911 about 7:40 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Second World War ended, 20-year-old Navy technician Robert Cyliax just wanted to go home. After a flight from Iwo Jima to Japan, another to California, then a two-week drive back home to Philadelphia, Cyliax was tired and not concerned with collecting paperwork. Nearly seven decades later, in the crowded kitchen of a Philadelphia veterans' shelter, the 89-year-old former sailor belatedly picked up five medals for his service Tuesday, all earned but never received. Members of Cyliax's family - some of whom had journeyed to Philadelphia from St. Louis - waited in the Veterans' Group shelter as his younger son, Curt, drove him from his Horsham home to the surprise ceremony.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FOR THE PAST five years, Doylestown native Devon Butler has sailed the seas, exploring shipwrecks, helping scientists assess oil-spill damages, excavating sunken cargo - whatever enabled him to indulge his passion for diving. His mother, Rosemary Carroll, worried occasionally about pirates, storms and diving accidents but didn't dwell on the dangers of her son's profession, lest her concerns consume her. Still, she never imagined the predicament Butler, 27, now endures: Police in Honduras hurled him and five crewmates into a dilapidated coastal jail on May 5, claiming that they were smuggling guns into the poor, crime-plagued Central American country.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
FROM Philadelphia to the Philippines, a young sailor is showing some brotherly love. Typhoon Haiyan swept across the South Pacific nation Nov. 8, killing nearly 4,000 people and displacing 4 million others. The USS George Washington was on the scene less than a week later. Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Nurse of Philly is among the 5,500 sailors onboard the nuclear-powered supercarrier. "It's amazing to be able to help out. One minute we're in Hong Kong, the next we're here," he said by phone from the Philippine Sea. "It feels awesome to be able to assist people in need.
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL Nineteen thousand feet above sea level was far from the wet and wind where John MacCausland likes to play. But the champion sailboat racer from Cherry Hill had always wanted to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, just as he had set his sights for decades on another goal: the world championship in the Star class of sailboats. He had won 19 East Coast championships and six North American championships since he began racing Stars as a teenager. He even crewed on the America's Cup winner, Stars and Stripes, in 1987.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The G-rated tour routes of the legendary warship are clearly marked with tape or paint. They take visitors to awesome 16-inch guns, feared by enemies from World War II through combat actions in Korea, Vietnam, and Lebanon. They head to Tomahawk missiles, the navigation bridge, and the captain's quarters. But visitors who come to the Battleship New Jersey for its monthly adult twilight tours are taken off the beaten track to see another side of the sailors' lives. Thursday night, they eyed a 5-by-5-foot painting of a Navy boiler man posing, as the curator said, with two "anatomically correct" women - one of many risqué artworks tucked away in the 887-foot ship's hidden nooks.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Margaret and Theodore Krier sailed their sloop down the Intracoastal Waterway in 1991 from Maryland to Florida, it was a leisurely trip. But as they returned, "they got caught up in the Perfect Storm," which devastated parts of the East Coast that autumn, son James said. Fortunately, "they took refuge in the Great Dismal Swamp Canal," which runs through coastal North Carolina and Virginia. "They missed the brunt of the storm," he said, but had tales to tell. On Sunday, July 21, Theodore G. Krier, 88, a former X-ray service technician in Philadelphia, died of heart failure at his home in Winston-Salem, N.C. He lived in Haddonfield from 1963 to 2010.
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