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August 21, 1987 | By Robert Weiss, Special to The Inquirer
Life at sea will drop anchor at Penn's Landing this weekend. Sea chanteys and tall tales from salty sailor types, dance groups, a contest of liars, seafood dishes from local restaurants, the commissioning of a Navy cruiser and a symphony of fireworks and orchestras on both sides of the Delaware River will be among the highlights of Maritime America - part of the We the People 200 celebration. The three-day event honoring the mariner's role in America's history will run today from 5 to 10 p.m. and continue from noon to 10 p.m. tomorrow and from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
The district attorney's office yesterday lifted the legal anchor from the backs of two Virginia sailors arrested May 22 after police discovered them firing handguns at tin cans in an isolated area near International Airport. Charges against Robin Frye, 22, of Madison, and Raymond Collins, 25, of Richmond, were withdrawn after their attorney, William Heiman, noted that the men "were not aware that there was a city ordinance against target practice. " Both sailors are assigned to the U.S. Independence, currently being overhauled at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
Ed Skomorucha was taking off his slippers late last Friday night and getting ready to go to bed when the phone rang. What he heard next caught him completely by surprise and kept him busy for the next week. "We're sorry to bother you, sir, but we're in trouble," someone said in Polish. "If you speak Polish, we're at the Ramada Inn, and we need help. " "I got dressed and told my wife I was going to the Ramada," said Skomorucha, 70, a retired appliance dealer and a prominent member of Wilmington's Polish community.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia lawyer who tried unsuccessfully last October to save a ship-jumping Ukrainian sailor from being returned to the Soviet Union has filed another legal action against the federal government, claiming it routinely ignores sailors' requests for asylum. Andrew Fylypovych, attorney for the Ukrainian-American Bar Association, filed a U.S. District Court complaint in Washington, D.C., asking for an injunction to prevent the practice and give asylum-seeking sailors attorneys.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Five U.S. sailors injured in a fire that killed six crewmen aboard a combat supply ship were in stable condition, a U.S. military hospital spokeswoman said today. "They are all expected to make a full recovery," Capt. Donna Eggleston said by telephone. The fire apparently was caused by a fuel oil leak in the engine room of the USS White Plains yesterday. "We don't know how it ignited," a U.S. Navy spokeswoman said in Washington. The vessel was being towed to Subic naval station, a U.S. ship repair facility 50 miles northwest of Manila.
NEWS
May 25, 1987
Two sharply contrasting images of patriotism haunt Memorial Day 1987. One is of black-bag patriots testifying before the congressional committee investigating the Iran-contra scandal. The other is of 37 sailors killed in the Iraqi missile attack on the American frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf. About the latter group our vision is clear. They died in the line of duty. It matters not that the Stark was on a peaceful patrol or that the attack has been described as a tragic mistake.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was barely up when the sailors of the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk began hustling to their battle stations. From the steamy, ovenlike bowels of the great ship to the breezy control tower 14 stories above, hundreds of crewmen were armed to the teeth, ready for action. Their weapons: cutting torches, metal grinders, hand tools, and paint brushes and rollers. Their enemies: time, rust and corrosion. Everywhere, the USS Kitty Hawk was laid open, as if undergoing surgery.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The three merchant sailors sat in the federal courtroom in Philadelphia yesterday and listened with the help of interpreters. Their eyes widened as a representative of their ship's owners said they should walk the proverbial plank by spending more time in an American prison for joining with five other crewmen and five officers of the Olivia to smuggle 51 refugees out of Brazil for a profit. "My client is concerned about the example or message we will be sending back to Brazil," attorney Lisa Reeves, a local lawyer representing Netumar Line Corp.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bjarne E. Pettersen, 73, a retired baker who aided thousands of Norwegian and Swedish sailors in Philadelphia over more than 40 years, died of cancer Saturday at his home in Lansdowne. A native of Hvaler Island, Norway, Mr. Pettersen came to the United States in 1951 and was a member and leader at the Norwegian Seamen's Mission in Philadelphia. He arranged bus tours to other cities, shopping sprees, picnics, and entertainment and published a newsletter for Norwegian and Swedish seamen, said his wife of six years, Betty F. Engh Pettersen.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By Alan Sipress and Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Families fearing for their sailor sons in the Persian Gulf waited yesterday for the all-important telephone call or visit - suffocated by fright, paralyzed by a lack of information from a world away. In Dumont, N.J., the family of Christopher Werner DeAngelis, 23, electronics technician second class, received that visit Monday. The two Navy officials who came to the DeAngelis home had few details. But they knew the one fact: Christopher DeAngelis was dead. And so far from home.
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NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Richard Burgess had a last-minute problem with his Star sailboat, he knew to go to his friend John M. MacCausland. "He was leaving the next day to go to Europe," to race his own Star in Kiel, Germany, Burgess said. "But he stayed all night" to repair the boat that Burgess himself needed for a pending East Coast race. "He was always there for you," said Burgess, who began sailing with and against Mr. MacCausland in 1966. On Saturday, July 23, Mr. MacCausland, 82, of Cherry Hill, a former owner of Marine Spars, a Star boat sales company there, died of complications from Parkinson's disease at Arden Courts of Cherry Hill, a memory care community.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The stolen memorial flag of Seaman Patrick Corcoran, a 19-year-old from Philadelphia who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans during the Vietnam War, was returned Monday to the scene of the July Fourth crime - the front porch of a North Wildwood home. On Monday, an unidentified young woman returned the flag, which was taken from a flagpole of a home owned by Tom and Lorraine Schaffer on East 11th Avenue. The woman then got back inside a car that was waiting outside the Schaffers' home and left.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
A special American flag - it had been presented to the family of a Philadelphia sailor who died during the Vietnam War - stolen July 4 from a Jersey Shore home has been located, a family associate said late Tuesday night. The flag was given to the family at the funeral of 19-year-old Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran, who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans when it collided with an Australian aircraft carrier in 1969. It was displayed on special occasions at the North Wildwood home of Tom Corcoran, Patrick's brother, until it disappeared last week.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The American flag presented to the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran at his funeral nearly 50 years ago is still missing. And the family wants it back, no questions asked. The priceless object was stolen on July 4th from a flagpole outside a home next door to the Corcoran family's Shore house in North Wildwood. Patrick Corcoran, a Torresdale native who served in the Vietnam War, died at sea at age 19 with 73 other sailors when the Navy destroyer USS Frank E. Evans collided in 1969 with Australia's HMAS Melbourne, an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
For nearly a decade, the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran has flown an American flag outside its Jersey Shore home on special occasions to honor the Philadelphia native lost at sea during the Vietnam War. It was the flag presented to the family nearly 50 years ago at his funeral. But early on the morning of July 4, someone snatched the huge flag from a flagpole on East 11th Avenue in North Wildwood only hours after it had been hoisted for the holiday. Now there is outrage among not only the Corcoran family and Shore officials but also in the emotions shared in a social-media campaign started by neighbors and the town to immediately return the cherished heirloom - one of the family's only physical connections to Corcoran, who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans in 1969.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Michael Boren, STAFF WRITER
The Chester County Coroner's Office has reopened the case of a 20-year-old Navy sailor from Phoenixville to determine whether a violent encounter with police at a rock concert in Camden — or drugs — killed him. Brett Katzenmoyer died five days after his 2007 arrest had left him with a concussion and broken nose. Conflicting accounts surround the incident. A security guard at a hospital where Katzenmoyer was taken said one police officer repeatedly punched Katzenmoyer, drawing blood.
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Robert W. Engle, 90, of Newtown Square, a businessman and avid sailor, died Friday, May 27, of a stroke at Dunwoody Village. A Lansdowne native, Mr. Engle graduated from East Lansdowne High School in 1944. During the summer, he worked at Combination Pump Valve Co., a specialized valve-making firm founded by his grandfather in 1915. After graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in mechanical engineering, Mr. Engle joined his father, Warren, and brother, Cal, at the valve company, now called CPV Manufacturing Inc. Mr. Engle rose to become president and CEO and took the Kennett Square company international before retiring in 2013.
NEWS
January 25, 2016
Edward Colimore is a former Inquirer staff writer The Gulf War had just broken out. Jeff Zaun, a Navy navigator and bombardier, was nestled in the cockpit of an A-6E Intruder, poised to drop cluster bombs on an Iraqi air base when a missile struck. The Cherry Hill native ejected along with pilot Bob Wetzel, who broke both arms exiting, and the two were captured and later whisked away to Baghdad for interrogation. In the days that followed, Zaun became the face of the first Gulf War, the image of the battered, bloodied American POW appearing on front pages, magazine covers, and televisions around the world.
NEWS
November 12, 2015
ISSUE | VETERANS DAY Keep our day I am a Vietnam veteran and proud off it. I honor and observe Veterans Day as a solemn day of prayer and remembrance. Now, Tom Taft, the chief operating officer at Germantown Academy, wants to make Veterans Day "our National Election Day" ("To honor service, move elections to Veterans Day," Nov. 4). One of the saddest statistics in America is the low voter turnout. In the 2012 presidential election, only 57.5 percent of eligible voters turned out. Last week, only 23.7 percent voted for Philadelphia mayor.
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