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NEWS
June 11, 2007
COULD SOMEONE tell me when the nitwits at Phillies games started to call for anybody who catches a ball hit by an opposing player to throw it back onto the field? That's a Chicago Cubs tradition. If you want to start a tradition here, have security grab the morons who throw the hot dogs on the field on dollar dog days and stick them somewhere that's not printable in this newspaper. Lou Gerner, Philadelphia
FOOD
June 13, 1990 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
"Salad days" are every day for slim gourmets! Fresh vegetables are a part of every meal, right? No? Why not? Can't shop often enough? Nobody can agree on ingredients? Can't stand/can't live without garlic (onions, green pepper, radishes, etc.) ? The family wants high-calorie dressings, but you don't? Here are some salad survival tips for getting the good greenery every day with minimum hassle: MAKE A MINI SALAD BAR: Serve a "suit-yourself" salad tray, instead of a salad in a bowl, with ingredients in separate mounds or piles on a shallow platter so each family member can assemble his or her own. SERVE SALAD NAKED: The salad, not you!
FOOD
May 11, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
The secret to successful salad-making is speedy preparation and quick delivery, lest your lettuce wilt to a wad of damp tissue before its time. But even wilting won't cause worry once you know another secret: the secret of salad longevity. It's marination, a simple process that not only makes a salad immune to the ravages of time but guarantees that it will miraculously improve with age. Marinated salads are already part of most cooks' warm-weather repertoires. Coleslaw and potato, pasta and three-bean salads are marinated favorites that lend themselves to hundreds of variations.
NEWS
June 26, 2002 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oh for the simplicity of a perfectly made salad. Martha Stewart, under investigation for alleged insider trading, told The Early Show host Jane Clayson that all she wanted to do was make a salad, but paused long enough from cabbage-slicing to predict she would be "exonerated of any ridiculousness. " Clayson persisted with questions about the domestic diva's stocks. Stewart sold 4,000 shares of ImClone stock the day before the Food and Drug Administration announced that it wouldn't approve the biotech firm's new drug for battling colorectal cancer.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Investigators from the Food and Drug Administration are working with police in the North Penn area of Montgomery County for the third time this week after a Souderton resident reported finding a pill in a salad bought in a convenience store in Towamencin Township. Towamencin Police Detective Stuart Newman said yesterday that an unidentified woman bought a chef salad at the Wawa Food Market on Forty Foot Road at 3:45 p.m. Monday. She ate half the salad and put it in her refrigerator.
FOOD
March 4, 2010 | By Anna Herman FOR THE INQUIRER
Even though the popular "spring mix" of greens has become ubiquitous in grocery stores year round, it just seems wrong to rely on it as a main salad ingredient every season of the year - especially in winter. Once, not so long ago, farmers, gardeners and diners waited eagerly for the first tender young leaves of lettuces and other greens to herald spring. Nowadays, modern farming, processing and shipping allows us all to serve clean and ready-cut salad from a bag whenever we please.
FOOD
January 11, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The young, harried executive returns to her desk to find a message that her husband has telephoned. She returns his call. "The reason I called," he explains, "is to find out if you would be agreeable to having stuffed shrimp, roast Cornish hen and Caesar salad for dinner this evening?" "That would be perfect," she replies. "And don't forget to chill some wine. " Was that a conversation between a working wife and a househusband, a husband about to spend hours food-shopping and then more time in the kitchen?
SPORTS
October 2, 1989 | By Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
Neal Anderson was sitting at his locker, eating forkfuls of salad from a plastic container. Last year, the superb Chicago Bears running back would dash off during his lunch break and later return with a hamburger and two orders of fries. Anderson ate like that "three times a day," but then it finally dawned on him that he was wrecking his health. Thus, when the Bears now break to eat and his teammates gravitate to the pizza, Anderson slides over to the salad bar. "I realized the diet I had was awful," Anderson said.
NEWS
May 31, 1997 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The ice cubes and the tossed salad were the source of the illness that caused food-poisoning symptoms in more than 100 people who dined at the Woodbine Inn over the Memorial Day weekend, state health officials said yesterday. According to Lyn Finelli, an epidemiologist with the Division of Communicable Diseases at the Health Department, preliminary lab tests conducted this week determined that the viral illness was associated with people who ate salads and drank beverages containing ice between May 22 and last Sunday.
NEWS
July 1, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
From her stoop next to Kurth's Seafood, known for its fried fish, Elestine Ashlock, at 82, can see beyond the papers in the gutter and the empty lots, still see the world as it was - the sprawling, brick trolley works at Ninth and Susquehanna, and Silk's grocery (or was it a drugstore?), and the old bookbindery, and a block away, the pretzel factory. There was much more in North Philadelphia, circa 1936, the year Jacob Kurth began selling his 35-cent fish platters (fried flounder, hand-cut fries, and choice of cole slaw or potato or macaroni salad)
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FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
One of summer's greatest culinary pleasures is food cooked on a grill, with backyard flames enhancing flavors like nothing else. But fire and hot coals can transform so much more than just burgers and dogs. Almost all the produce bursting from local farms and gardens can be cooked outside - creating flavorful fare from appetizers through desserts. Grilled whole, sliced, layered or wrapped, almost every vegetable and many fruits can be converted into tasty fare on a barbecue grill.
FOOD
July 25, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
The humble mason jar has become the symbol of DIY culture, Pinterest aspiration, and nostalgia for homespun days of yore. Invented in Philadelphia in 1858 and revived by neo-food preservationists and Martha Stewart wedding pictorials circa the early aughts, the old-timey glass with the tin lid has become the go-to restaurant vessel for cocktails, single-serve cakes, and plain old tap water. Mason jars just seem to make everything look simple - in a good way. It's not only a matter of aesthetics, though.
FOOD
May 9, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
We were cooking at noon because of early dismissal for teacher report-card conferences, and some students were opening their report cards for the first time. "I got an A in violin!" exclaimed Kimberly Luu - which set off a round of bragging about how many A's each received that lasted until I could get the geniuses to focus on cooking. Before starting our spring cooking classes, I had asked several local chefs for simple, nutritious recipes that included fresh produce, could be prepared in about an hour, cost less than $20 for six servings, and contained about 20 grams of protein and no more than 500 calories per serving.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
I should have known, when the sun was shining brightly on the first perfect spring afternoon after so many wicked winter days, that it would be tough for 10-year-olds to focus on cooking. On top of that, my fifth grade chefs had just completed six days of PSSA testing at Henry Lawton Elementary and they were having a hard time standing still, much less concentrating on one recipe - let alone two. Frankly, it would have been a good day to make scrambled eggs. But the plan, in my continuing quest for healthy, low-cost cooking, was to teach how to use up fresh ingredients - in this case, ginger, cilantro, and garlic - by employing them in more than one recipe: turkey lettuce wraps and corn salad.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Infusions faced off with fusion and lobster bisque battled broccoli rabe on Broad Street on Saturday as hundreds of cooking hopefuls turned out to audition for Season 5 of MasterChef , the culinary reality television show. Tupperware in tow at the DoubleTree by Hilton hotel, they were all taking their stab at becoming the next Luca Manfe - that is, the restaurant manager from Astoria, Queens, who won last season's competition, scoring $250,000 and a cookbook deal. "We are looking for passion," said casting director Erika Landin.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Company description: "With so many premier dining destinations in one location, Cherry Hill Mall is an ideal venue to host a restaurant week," said Lisa Wolstromer, mall marketing director. It's the mall's first. Location: 2000 Route 38, Cherry Hill. Complimentary valet parking for all restaurants along Bistro Row. The deal: Eight chains and one independent at the iconic mall have special menus and prices through Saturday. Reservations encouraged. Nutrition: We know Seasons 52 prides itself on menu items that are no more than 475 calories.
FOOD
June 27, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedg, Washington Post
With today's meat-on-the-side, vegetables-in-the-middle sensibility, it's time for an update on the steak dinner. Slice that steak thin and mix it with vegetables for a beautiful main-course salad. Teriyaki Steak, Snow Pea and Shiitake Salad     For the steak: 3 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 2 teaspoons brown sugar 1 pound flank steak, 1 to 1 1/2 inches thick For the salad: Kosher salt 6 ounces snow pea pods 3 tablespoons olive oil 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, sliced into 1/4-inch strips 1/2 medium sweet onion, finely chopped (1/2 cup)
FOOD
June 20, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
With this sandwich-inspired salad, you get to enjoy a classic flavor combination, skip the bread, and cut way back on the bacon. The basil-balsamic dressing is lighter than a mayonnaise-based spread.   Chopped Turkey Club Salad With Basil Balsamic Dressing   4 to 6 servings 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons red winevinegar 2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard 1/2 cup loosely packed basil leaves, finely chopped 1/4 teaspoon sugar, or to taste Salt Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup olive oil 12 ounces lettuce(s)
FOOD
May 9, 2013
Makes 6 to 8 servings For the croutons 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cups rustic bread, cut into 1-inch cubes Salt and freshly ground black pepper For the chicken 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, pounded to 3/4-inch 1 teaspoon olive oil For the dressing 2 garlic cloves 2 anchovies Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/2 teaspoon Worcester- shire sauce 1 egg, coddled (see note) 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 3 heads romaine let- tuce, outer leaves discarded, inner leaves washed and dried 2 ounces Parmesan cheese, shaved with a vegetable peeler 1. To make the croutons: Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
FOOD
May 2, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of April 30, 2013: Craig LaBan: With the spring weather blooming, it's my cue to lighten up with salads like this one from Zea Mays Kitchen truck, which focuses on creative uses for Native American ingredients. It didn't make into our food-truck story, so I'm glad to give it a shout-out. In big restaurant news from the Insider , some exciting new projects coming to the burbs have been announced: Josh Lawler of the Farm and Fisherman is the latest big Philly name to head to South Jersey, with plans to take over Andreotti's Viennese Café on Route 70 in Cherry Hill with a larger and more casual F & F Tavern and Market, targeted for the fall.
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