CollectionsSalad Bar
IN THE NEWS

Salad Bar

LIVING
July 30, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camp food has come a long way since a favorite ditty was: The meatballs that they give us They say are mighty fine, One rolled off the table And hurt a friend of mine. Mystery meat is out, and restaurant-style menus with salad bars are in as camps try to please growing numbers of vegetarian campers and children with more diverse tastes - not to mention health-minded parents. "I have seen a real consciousness-raising in the camps about food and the importance of proper nutrition," said Jeffrey Solomon, executive director of the National Camp Association, which helps families find sleep-away camps.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Russ Parsons, LOS ANGELES TIMES
Kale is about as unlikely a food star as you can imagine. It's tough and fibrous. Bite a piece of raw kale and you'll practically end up with splinters between your teeth. Nevertheless, kale has become a green of the moment because, given a little special care, it's not only edible but delicious. You can cook it, of course, the lower and slower the better. But surprisingly, one of the most popular ways to use kale these days is in salads. Though kale leaves have always been found on almost every salad bar, it wasn't for reasons of edibility - it was for decoration, because this was one green so tough it would last forever without wilting.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | by Lauralee Dobbins, For the Daily News
There's a lot to be said for being direct, clear and concise. Take JDz Reef & Beef, formerly Wazoo's on Route 73 in Cherry Hill. Reef & Beef tells you everything you need to know about this restaurant. They offer seafood and steak. Pretty straightforward. I like that. I also like the way they do it. By borrowing from Caribbean coral reefs in their paint selections, they've created a lively, underwater feel in a restaurant that has had western and train station themes in the past.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new Cafe La Spada in Cherry Hill is an astonishing place. Open six months, the restaurant offers massive portions of tasty, home- cooked southern Italian cuisine at bargain prices. Indeed, dinner for two with more good food than you probably can eat will cost less than $30, including dessert. The restaurant has no liquor license, so you will save there too. La Spada replaced Akbar, the good Indian restaurant at the rear of the Market Place on Route 70. The new, pleasantly informal bistro decor includes red-and-white checked tablecloths, white laminated placemats, paper napkins, silk roses and a luminescent glow from pearllike candleholders.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the outside, Salann's looks as unpromising as most other shopping- center restaurants; inside, the unpretentious decor of the restaurant in Cherry Hill offers little to cause a second glance. But instead of decor, Salann's offers some of the best Italian food this side of Rome, at prices you can afford without skimping on holiday presents. From start to finish, the food was memorable, at times almost spectacular. Each dish is cooked to order, but there is more than enough food to nibble on while waiting for your main courses.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The venerable salad bar has gone international and that means almost anything goes. One of the newest and best exponents of this philosophy is South Street Victory. Its bountiful buffet of 40-plus items, not including extras like challah bread, is extraordinarily colorful and exceedingly well maintained. The all-you-can-eat price is $6.99 ($3.99 for kids 5 to 12, $2 for kids under 5). Or you can opt to take out and pay $3.49 a pound. Start with vegetable sushi and sinus-opening wasabi horseradish.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although the Lobster Pot and Steak House in Wawa has been around a long time, this popular restaurant has never been known for culinary excellence. Still, it you choose carefully, you can discover modest delights: The salad bar is a safe bet and some of the two dozen seafood dishes on the menu seem promising; despite its name, the restaurant serves mostly seafood. Although it is unlikely you will find anything unfamiliar on the salad bar, the ingredients are nicely fresh and crisp, and it is easy to fashion a decent salad from among iceberg lettuce, fresh spinach, plump cherry tomatoes, sliced cucumber, pickled beets, chopped egg, wonderfully fresh mushrooms, chick peas, Bermuda onions, alfalfa sprouts, black olives and store-bought croutons and bacon bits, to name most of the offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you lust after things like crab legs and shrimp, you might want to catch an all-you-can-eat special at O'Hara's Fish House in University City. O'Hara's doesn't look like the typical old-time fish house. The restaurant is large and attractive, with a bar; comfortable dining areas mixing booths and tables are separated by half-walls, posts and aquariums. Along with the regular menu, there's a "Dining With Heart" listing of appetizers, sandwiches, entrees and desserts that are lower in fat, cholesterol and sodium.
FOOD
July 19, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Tender yet crispy fried chicken cutlets are enough to turn even the simplest salad into a main dish. Serve them on a seasonal salad of tomatoes, cucumbers and carrots now, or shredded red cabbage, red onions, apples or avocado come fall. Crispy Chicken Salad (Makes 4 to 5 servings) 1. For the chicken , remove the tenderloin of each breast half. Butterfly each half for 8 cutlets and 4 tenderloins. Season with salt and pepper. 2. Set up the flour and egg. Mix the panko and Parmesan.
NEWS
February 24, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
It was a Tuesday night, and there was still a 45-minute wait to sit down for dinner at the Pub. Parties of two, three and four lounged in the restaurant's entranceway and bar area, listening for their names over the hostess' loudspeaker. Although I'd passed the Pub on my way to Cherry Hill a million times, this was the first time I'd ventured into its cavernous interior, which has remained virtually unchanged since the family-owned restaurant opened in 1951. However, it will be changing ownership in about four to five weeks, and the new owners have pledged to keep the concept the same, says current owner Gary Perez.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|