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Salad Bar

NEWS
May 2, 2001 | by Theresa Conroy Daily News Staff Writer
Mobster or prosecutor, TV reporter or defense attorney, consigliere's brother or police commissioner - aren't we really all the same when we're sitting in front of nice chicken parm with a little rigatoni on the side? We are. Especially if that cutlet is breaded just right - light, golden - and the gravy tastes like grandmom's and the cheese isn't 9 inches thick and the rigatoni is al dente. This is how they make it at Pagano's Market, an eatery that has become the lunchtime home for players of the Joseph "Skinny Joey" Merlino mob racketeering trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
For a good number of years, Palooka's diner had been a Wilkes-Barre landmark. It took its name from the comic strip character Joe Palooka - created by native son Hammond "Ham" Fisher back in the '30s - who appeared in close to 900 newspapers at the height of his career. Palooka the fighter was "retired" in 1984. He was a perennial champion and tough guy who knocked out Jack McSwat with a crushing right to the jaw in an early strip. Out of the ring, he was a champion of graciousness whose engagement to character Ann Howe went on for 18 years.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Imagine putting the finishing touches on Sunday dinner when you realize you are missing that one ingredient that makes your special dish different from, and taste better than, anyone else's. Glancing at your watch, you realize you don't have time to stand in a long line at the supermarket. If the new self-checkout terminal at Genuardi's Family Markets in Chesterbrook is any indication of the possibilities, you might not have to for much longer. "It's been great," said Nancy Law, an associate manager at Genuardi's.
LIVING
July 30, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camp food has come a long way since a favorite ditty was: The meatballs that they give us They say are mighty fine, One rolled off the table And hurt a friend of mine. Mystery meat is out, and restaurant-style menus with salad bars are in as camps try to please growing numbers of vegetarian campers and children with more diverse tastes - not to mention health-minded parents. "I have seen a real consciousness-raising in the camps about food and the importance of proper nutrition," said Jeffrey Solomon, executive director of the National Camp Association, which helps families find sleep-away camps.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Here are the four magic words at the shore: All You Can Eat. Some of the cheapest, most plentiful meals in South Jersey are lined up on the buffet tables in Atlantic City casinos. Here's where you can eat. And eat. And eat. Atlantic City Hilton's Cornucopia Buffet. The land and sea buffet offers fresh fish, steamed clams, rotisserie turkey and chicken. Open 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Friday, until 10 p.m. Saturday. $14.99 weekdays, $15.99 weekends. Bally's Park Place Sidewalk Buffet.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | by Beth D'Adonno, Special to the Daily News
Steak is no longer a guilty pleasure. As long as a body doesn't partake too often, red meat isn't going to send a healthy person to an early grave. Which is why a visit to Charlie Brown's Steakhouse in Woodbury seemed like a capital idea on a recent Tuesday night. The 15-year-old restaurant, one of three in the area (the other locations are in Maple Shade and Mount Holly), is part of a 27-restaurant chain based in North Jersey. The Woodbury location is in a sprawling storefront building on Broad Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
The view from the Chart House, the popular food marina permanently moored down along the Delaware River, is one of the city's finest. Particularly if you get to slip in and dock by the huge, panoramic windows. Boats - from craft so small they seem overpowered by the rippling tidal surge, to massive seagoing vessels - share the riverscape with passenger jets, helicopters, and even a seagull or two. To its credit, over a steady course of nearly 15 years, the Chart House has gained a reputation as a reliably consistent eatery.
NEWS
February 24, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
It was a Tuesday night, and there was still a 45-minute wait to sit down for dinner at the Pub. Parties of two, three and four lounged in the restaurant's entranceway and bar area, listening for their names over the hostess' loudspeaker. Although I'd passed the Pub on my way to Cherry Hill a million times, this was the first time I'd ventured into its cavernous interior, which has remained virtually unchanged since the family-owned restaurant opened in 1951. However, it will be changing ownership in about four to five weeks, and the new owners have pledged to keep the concept the same, says current owner Gary Perez.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The afternoon I arrived at Lake Austin Spa Resort, I knew I would have to return someday. I had flown to Austin in late March to escape winter-battered Chicago, where the skies had been gray and the winds freezing since November. After so many months of cold and snow, my longing for Nature at her most benign was visceral. The drive to the spa, only 20 miles from downtown Austin, took longer than it should have because I got lost. By the time I made the turn up the hill that led to the lake, I was annoyed at myself, the directions, and just about anything else I could think of. Within minutes of check-in, my anxieties abated.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Back in the early 1950s, before the Outbacks and Lone Stars were opening steakhouses across the road from each other, there was the Pub. In fact, there were five of them. Four in Philadelphia and one in Pennsauken. It might take someone who's been around for a while to recall the Pub at Hunting Park and Allegheny Avenues, or even the Pub Tiki at 18th and Walnut, but you can be as tender as an aged steak and still know about the Pennsauken Pub. The secret to the Pub's longevity?
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