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Salami

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FOOD
March 1, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
Salami is the hot topic of debate these days in the affluent Boston suburb of Newton, at least between delicatessen owners and health officials. They're battling over whether beef salami should be hung in shop windows for display or whether it must always be refrigerated. "Salami has been hanging in store windows everywhere for over 100 years," said Arthur Rodman, co-owner of Barry's Village Deli, who is contesting a city health commissioner's order to refrigerate the meat.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
The cigar factory, the perfume plant, the furniture store . . . They're all gone. So's the home for unwed moms, and the home for the blind. Saddest of all, most of the old-timers are gone, too. But not Dan's. After more than 50 years, Dan's Hoagie Shop remains, hanging in there as one of the last unbroken threads in a neighborhood whose tapestry has changed and faded over the years. The friendly, little neighborhood hoagie shop on Woodland Avenue in Southwest Philadelphia has changed little from the day a young man fresh out of World War II opened it in November 1946.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comedy vet Jackie Mason, 75, has filed a $2 mil lawsuit against Jews for Jesus for using his name and image in one of the org's pamphlets. Filed in New York state Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit seeks the destruction of the pamphlet, which has an image of Mason next to the words "Jackie Mason . . . A Jew for Jesus!?" The pamphlet, which plays with Mason's shoulder-shrugging question-asking shtick, expounds on the similarities between Judaism and Christianity. "While I have the utmost respect for people who practice the Christian faith . . . I am as Jewish as a matzo ball or kosher salami," Mason said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
H. & J. McNally's Schmitter is legendary among Chestnut Hill pub-goers. Like any legend, the sandwich has inspired a few myths. Some folks believe it's named for former Phillies third baseman Mike Schmidt. Women in their ninth month of pregnancy have sworn eating a Schmitter induces childbirth. But here's the real story behind the Schmitter. One night in the late '60s, former Chestnut Hill Hospital ER worker and McNally's regular Dennis Krenich asked bar owner Hugh McNally for something different on his cheesesteak.
FOOD
June 27, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
Don't be fooled by the dainty Art Nouveau interior at RoseLena's, 1623 E. Passyunk Ave. Owners Terry and Al Masino and their son and executive chef, Chris, serve one he-man of a sandwich in their rendition of the French Quarter favorite, the muffuletta. RoseLena's muffuletta is filled with mortadella, Genoa salami, prosciutto, mozzarella, provolone and, of course, the all-important olive spread. They get their French boules from Carangi's Italian Bakery. Terry Masino admits this sandwich may be considered an artery clogger, but only if one overdoes it. As her mother (RoseLena's namesake)
FOOD
February 28, 2008
Having it all Why waste time trying to choose between flavor favorites when you can enjoy them all at one bite? "Everything" bagel chips include sesame and poppy seeds, bits of onion and garlic, plus sea salt, and are oh-so-good. Almost addictive. That leaves just one dilemma: to shmear or not to shmear these melba-like rounds. Bring along a pig What an adorable - and tasty - appetizer for a party: smoked pork and beef salami fashioned into a little porker. Just one of the many delights at this Russian grocery store in the Northeast.
FOOD
December 18, 2008
No one handles the big boys quite like Claudio's "King of Cheese," the Ninth Street stalwart where the provolones are bigger than some of the customers. It's the pure mass of those 120-pounders, though, which hang sentry in waxy ivory rows of giant "salami" near the front door, that gives this cheese its luster. After a year of dangle time, these gargantuas made in Cremona from rich winter milk take on a luminous tang and trademark texture, with fissures that break into age rings. All the easier to chunk for the extra-sharp holiday platter.
FOOD
June 12, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
At the end of the Atlantic City Expressway, a barrage of bright signs attempts to lure incoming traffic to casinos with promises of big jackpots and hot shows. Just beyond the boardwalk casinos, beaches tempt vacationers with white sand and cool surf. But a quick right off the expressway on Mississippi Avenue, away from the lights and the lifeguards, Atlantic City's best-loved sub shop poses the biggest enticement for incoming traffic. Owner Anthony Basile opened the White House in 1946 and named the shop after what it was, a white house.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony E. Napoli, 67, of Cherry Hill, a well-known surgical podiatrist in Philadelphia, died of diabetes complications Thursday, June 10, at Virtua Marlton. Dr. Napoli's career happened by chance. In 1963, his fiancee, Roberta Vellozzi, had foot surgery, and her doctors told her that podiatry was a growing field. She mentioned it to her future husband, who immediately started looking into it. The couple married in 1964, and a few months later Dr. Napoli left his job at an insurance agency to study at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine in Cleveland.
SPORTS
December 10, 1994 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
If Andy Dolich has reached the top of his profession by being named president and chief operating officer of the Golden State Warriors, he will never forget the first rung on the ladder. That was in 1971, when he joined the 76ers, helping to sell season tickets, working in the promotions department and doing whatever else anyone needed. He spent the last 14 years with baseball's Oakland Athletics, and most recently was their executive vice president. "In the NBA today, a fan can come out of the stands, hit a halfcourt shot during halftime and win a trip around the world or a car," said Dolich, who spent three seasons with the Sixers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY SUSAN M. SELASKY, McClatchy News Service
    THEY SAY life's a picnic. It can be if you heed our advice and fill up that basket, toss in a favorite quilt or vintage throw and head for the outdoors. Picnicking is a great way to relax, nosh on some terrific eats and enjoy a sun-filled afternoon lunch or early dinner. Picnics can be about the food, the venue, the company - or all three. With that notion in mind, here are some tips to help plan the perfect picnic. Unless you're planning for a crowd, there is no need to spend days cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011
I WAS ASKED TO come up with a list of gifts for the foodies in your life. People like me. I know, I know, we're insufferable snobs who are impossible to buy for. But we're your friends and relatives and you love us, so you have to buy something. I am not, unfortunately, much of a gadget person. If I get one more gimmicky corkscrew - like, say, the Bill Clinton corkscrew I received in which the screw extends from his crotch - I'm going to scream. My old, basic double-hinged waiter's corkscrew works just fine, thank you. And no, I don't want fancy 12-ounce "martini" glasses - simple, classic 4.5-ounce cocktail glasses from the local bar supply store work just fine, thank you. For me, the best gifts are often just the food or drink itself.
NEWS
December 23, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
If you remember Frank's Soda Works in South Philadelphia, know the attributes of both the Electric Factory and the Arena, or understand the rivalry between the students at St. Maria Goretti and Girls High, then Philadelphia entrepreneur Fred Lavner has something for you. In August, Lavner launched a line of nostalgic T-shirts and hoodies cleverly named B4 - as in before B'nai Jeshurun Synagogue left Strawberry Mansion for Mount Airy, then...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
AS HAPPENS to most high-school couples, even the musical ones, Zac Efron and Vanessa Hudgens have broken up. "It's nothing dramatic," an unnamed source told E! Online. "There's no third party involved. " "They were together for so long. It just ran its course," said another insider. Sources insist the pair remain friends, and if neither makes a hit film soon, they may work together again as teaching assistants in "High School Musical 7. " Elizabeth Hurley says she has separated from her husband of three years, Arun Nayar . Hurley's tweeted announcement - how else to tell the world you're breaking up and then complain that people are invading your privacy?
NEWS
December 12, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Looking for an unusual gift? Carol and Elliot Schwartz may have just the thing: a print of Erdenheim artist Nancy Beck's painting of a sandwich, not any sandwich but the cholesterol-elevating, gut-expanding Schmitter, grilled at the Linc, the ballpark, and McNally's Tavern, the lively Chestnut Hill dive. The only problem with the print ($200 framed, $90 without) is it makes you seriously hungry. Fortunately, the Schwartzes include a coupon for the gastro-art's inspiration. Their gallery is a short walk from McNally's - longer if you've had a Schmitter and a pint.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony E. Napoli, 67, of Cherry Hill, a well-known surgical podiatrist in Philadelphia, died of diabetes complications Thursday, June 10, at Virtua Marlton. Dr. Napoli's career happened by chance. In 1963, his fiancee, Roberta Vellozzi, had foot surgery, and her doctors told her that podiatry was a growing field. She mentioned it to her future husband, who immediately started looking into it. The couple married in 1964, and a few months later Dr. Napoli left his job at an insurance agency to study at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine in Cleveland.
FOOD
February 26, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If you'd kept a sharp eye out driving down the easternmost stretch of Girard Avenue last week, you might not have missed the unprepossessing, six-stool lunch counter just past Second that's called Paesano's. Used to be a breakfast joint called Senka's. But Paesano's is a good fit now, the new owner - Peter McAndrews, who runs Modo Mio across the street - having recast it as an homage to "Philly Style sandwiches with Italian inspiration. " Just in time, you could say, the genuine item having been co-opted and roundly abused.
FOOD
December 18, 2008
No one handles the big boys quite like Claudio's "King of Cheese," the Ninth Street stalwart where the provolones are bigger than some of the customers. It's the pure mass of those 120-pounders, though, which hang sentry in waxy ivory rows of giant "salami" near the front door, that gives this cheese its luster. After a year of dangle time, these gargantuas made in Cremona from rich winter milk take on a luminous tang and trademark texture, with fissures that break into age rings. All the easier to chunk for the extra-sharp holiday platter.
FOOD
February 28, 2008
Having it all Why waste time trying to choose between flavor favorites when you can enjoy them all at one bite? "Everything" bagel chips include sesame and poppy seeds, bits of onion and garlic, plus sea salt, and are oh-so-good. Almost addictive. That leaves just one dilemma: to shmear or not to shmear these melba-like rounds. Bring along a pig What an adorable - and tasty - appetizer for a party: smoked pork and beef salami fashioned into a little porker. Just one of the many delights at this Russian grocery store in the Northeast.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comedy vet Jackie Mason, 75, has filed a $2 mil lawsuit against Jews for Jesus for using his name and image in one of the org's pamphlets. Filed in New York state Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit seeks the destruction of the pamphlet, which has an image of Mason next to the words "Jackie Mason . . . A Jew for Jesus!?" The pamphlet, which plays with Mason's shoulder-shrugging question-asking shtick, expounds on the similarities between Judaism and Christianity. "While I have the utmost respect for people who practice the Christian faith . . . I am as Jewish as a matzo ball or kosher salami," Mason said.
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