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Salary Cap

SPORTS
September 4, 1996 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
The NFL salary cap is making teams do some very strange things. In Baltimore this summer, owner Art Modell gave a pink slip to Pro Bowl wide receiver Andre Rison, just a year after he gave him a $5 million signing bonus. Rison's release had nothing to do with his ability to play football. The Ravens just needed cap room to sign their draft picks. So, they cut a man who has averaged 78.3 receptions a season over the last six years. In Arizona, the cap-strapped Cardinals unloaded defensive end Clyde Simmons, who led the team in sacks last year, and 1,000-yard rusher Garrison Hearst to make room under the cap for first-round defensive end Simeon Rice and holdout defensive tackle Eric Swann.
SPORTS
November 3, 1998 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Call them cheap, call them tight, call them thrifty. Call them those things and, for the moment, you will be wrong. Minutes before a deadline that would keep money spent this season from counting wholly against this year's salary cap, the Eagles renegotiated the contract of cornerback Bobby Taylor, their most attractive player who is in the final year of a contract. One broadcast report said Taylor's new deal, which includes an increased salary for this season and locks him up for the next six seasons, was worth $30 million, including a $5 million signing bonus, but NFL and team sources said the deal could be worth as much as $33 million, including roster and signing bonuses of as much as $6 million.
SPORTS
August 3, 1994 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
For much of the offseason, Rich Miano mentally prepared himself for the possibility of becoming an ex-Eagle. He will be 32 on the eve of the Eagles' opener Sept. 3 and he made more than $325,000 in 1993. Those two reasons - in case you haven't been clued in during Year 1 of the salary-cap era - are all teams need nowadays to say goodbye to dependable thirtysomething veterans. "There were times I didn't think I'd be back," Miano said. "From the get-go, I wanted to come back here, but for a long time it looked like I might be outta here, because of money and other things.
SPORTS
March 20, 1995 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
Coach Ray Rhodes and owner Jeffrey Lurie are likely to hear soon that the San Francisco 49ers will not match an Eagles offer sheet signed Saturday by free agent running back Ricky Watters. Watters and his agent, Blaine Pollock, went public with news of the Eagles' offer to Denver media during a card show there Saturday afternoon. The Eagles' offer to Watters, the 49ers' transition player, is a three- year, $6.9 million package that sources said includes $3.6 million guaranteed in the first year and unguaranteed salaries of $1.5 million and $1.8 million in 1996 and '97. San Francisco president Carmen Policy was officially notified of the offer sheet Saturday.
SPORTS
March 4, 1997 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
As the faithful grow restless, as the rumblings for new blood crawl toward a clamor, the Eagles' organization responds with a collective, unconcerned shrug. Free agency began 2 1/2 weeks ago. For all the Eagles have done regarding roster additions, the shopping season might well begin 2 1/2 weeks from now. Fans want action. They want it now. Tough. It ain't gonna happen any time soon. Nor should it. No matter how much it hurts to say it, the Eagles, in holding off on big signings, are doing the smart thing.
SPORTS
May 13, 1997 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
Many NFL teams are counting on the new television package to bail them out of serious salary-cap difficulties. But a big increase in the league's TV money won't necessarily mean a big increase in the cap. At least not right away. There are two reasons for that. One is that the NFL usually backloads its TV deals, with only a small increase in the first year and larger increases in each succeeding year. Second, as part of a salary-cap settlement over expansion-team revenues last year, the league and the NFL Players Association agreed to a cap "credit" of nearly $4 million per team that would be paid back in 1998 and possibly 1999.
SPORTS
October 3, 1997 | By Phil Sheridan and Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Eagles, who have made a routine of extending key players' contracts in the middle of the season, may not be able to do so this year. Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie said yesterday that the team doesn't have the salary-cap space to extend the contract of a player such as Ricky Watters, who is in the last year of his contract. Attempts to re-sign Watters will have to wait until after the season, when he is eligible for free agency. "That depends on the salary cap," Lurie said.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Dave Urbanski, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The recently approved increase in the salary range for the Deptford Township public defender has Democratic council members fuming over what they are calling a waste of money. The ordinance, passed by the council, 4-3, amends the township salary code, raising the cap on the salary of the part-time public defender to $5,000 a year, said Lois De More, acting manager. The previous minimum had been $1,850, with a cap of about $3,000 a year. Republicans voted for the ordinance.
SPORTS
August 31, 1994 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
In Toronto, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman was meeting with NHL Players Association executive director Bob Goodenow. In Voorhees, N.J., Eric Lindros was heading for the parking lot after finishing an informal workout with just about all of his Flyers teammates, who had gathered in anticipation of training camp, scheduled to start Monday. In Texas, the Dallas Morning News was reporting that NHL management plans to lock out the players starting Monday, if there is no collective bargaining agreement in place by then to replace the one that expired a year ago. The crux of the whole business was written under the brim of Lindros's baseball cap. "THIS IS NOT A SALARY CAP," it said, in bold, black marker.
SPORTS
February 2, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Facing growing political pressure to end the baseball strike, owners made a major shift when they abandoned their salary cap proposal for a luxury tax. The new offer, made as talks resumed yesterday after a 40-day break, moved the owners off their central demand to reduce player salaries to 50 percent of revenue. While the owners offered two luxury tax plans in November and December, those plans would have worked as caps, since both contained escalators that would have raised the tax rates without limit until the players' share of revenue declined from 58 percent to 50 percent.
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