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Sales Tax

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NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - A sales-tax exemption measure designed to encourage major online retailers to locate in New Jersey has been introduced in the Legislature. The bill would help alleviate disparities between online retailers, who are not required to collect New Jersey's 7 percent sales tax unless they have a physical presence in the state, and bricks-and-mortar stores, according to Democrats. "My goal and the goal of legislative leadership has always been to find a way to balance the interests of the retail merchants and the Internet merchants in a way that will ensure equity and a level playing field going forward," said Assembly Majority Leader Louis D. Greenwald (D., Camden)
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Gov. Casey declared his adamant opposition yesterday to a Republican proposal that would raise the state sales tax to achieve local tax revision - even though the plan has yet to be completed or formally unveiled. Casey, at a hastily called news conference, also pledged to veto a second plan by Senate Republicans to make tax cuts of $98 million, mostly in business taxes. "This year I do not think it's appropriate for Pennsylvania to be reducing taxes or to be increasing taxes because of the fiscal situation we find ourselves in," Casey said.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Officials from Pennsylvania and New York signed a cooperative agreement yesterday to combat sales-tax evasion. Under the agreement, the two states will share merchants' sales-tax information as well as lists of customers who have purchased items in either state but have not paid sales tax. Pennsylvania charges a 6 percent sales tax while New York charges a 4 percent sales tax with a local option of up to 4.25 percent. Pennsylvania law requires state residents who buy merchandise out of state to pay a 6 percent use tax, applicable in mail and telephone orders and in cases when items bought in person are shipped to the buyer's home state.
NEWS
June 28, 2006 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Assembly Democrats who have balked at Gov. Corzine's budget proposals will hold a hearing today on a spending plan of their own that avoids a one-point increase in the state's 6 percent sales tax. The $30.4 billion alternative budget has no across-the-board tax increase but institutes a new fee on New Jersey wage-earners, adds taxes on fur coats and car rentals, and makes deeper cuts to child welfare, parks and property-tax programs than the...
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Put a little extra Gleem on the old toothbrush this morning. Heck, floss if you've got the urge. Go out to the bagel shop and buy a dozen. Buy two dozen. Starting immediately, those and other items will be free from the state sales tax after coming under the 6 percent levy - by mistake - for the last 2 1/2 months. Gov. Casey yesterday signed legislation that cleaned up errors in the $3 billion-plus tax-increase package passed in August. The changes, unanimously approved this week by the House and Senate, will cost an estimated $30 million in revenue.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | By Diane Mastrull, Bridget Eklund and Christina Asquith, FOR THE INQUIRER
You drive across the border into Delaware daily, in sport-utility vehicles, minivans, or at least cars with roomy trunks. All you Pennsylvanians and New Jerseyans are on a mission to buy on the cheap, bypassing malls, big-box retailers and mom-and-pop stores at home to pocket savings. Computers, refrigerators, furniture and stereo systems. All of it is available in Delaware without sales tax. It's one of five states with that shopper-heaven distinction. Alaska, Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon are the others.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State and township officials are pushing to lower the 6 percent state sales tax to 3 percent in a section of the township, saying business owners cannot compete with adjacent communities that already have a reduced sales tax. "If people come here, they have to pay 6 percent," said Township Administrator Ed Sasdelli. "Why would they come here if it is cheaper to go there?" Earlier this year, township officials formed a task force to find ways to level the economic playing field in Franklin, a 55-square-mile municipality that bellies up to Salem County and Vineland, which boast a 3 percent sales tax. The task force caught the attention of Sen. John J. Matheussen (R., Gloucester)
NEWS
June 25, 2006 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
With less than a week before the state's budget deadline, Gov. Corzine and his fellow Democrats are locked in a sales-tax showdown. The former Wall Street executive has tied the future of his first budget to a one-penny increase in the state's 6 percent sales tax, arguing that it would solve a years-long fiscal crisis. But majority-party lawmakers - and South Jersey Democrats in particular - are standing squarely in his way. Negotiations on the freshman governor's proposed $30.9 billion spending plan have gone so poorly that Corzine has told his staff to prepare for a government shutdown if he rejects the budget the Legislature is required to send him before July 1. Faced with that kind of deadline pressure, some North and Central Jersey lawmakers are willing to discuss a last-minute change of heart on the sales tax. Sen. Paul Sarlo (D., Bergen)
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The state Division of Taxation has performed periodic spot checks for sales-tax certificates at the Columbus Farmer's Market flea market since New Jersey instituted a sales tax in 1966. But on Aug. 20, about 60 investigators from the office descended on the Thursday-morning outdoor flea market off Route 206 in Springfield and checked about 900 merchants, in what state officials describe as the first major sweep of the market. "No, it wasn't really a raid," Kenneth Munn, assistant to the state taxation director, said last week.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By Kaitlin Gurney, Jennifer Moroz and Elisa Ung INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Defiant Assembly Democrats still say New Jersey didn't need a sales-tax increase. But what the state did need six days into an increasingly embarrassing government shutdown, they said, was a deal. Democrats arrived at the Statehouse yesterday morning resigned to putting an end to their weeks-long showdown with Gov. Corzine over his proposed one-point increase in the state's 6 percent sales tax. And so when he offered a compromise - albeit one a shade different than a plan he had embraced 10 days ago - they jumped at it. Like the 10-day-old compromise brokered by Senate President Richard J. Codey (D., Essex)
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NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
The American Beverage Association, along with some Philadelphia residents and businesses, filed suit Wednesday to block the city's recently enacted sweetened-beverage tax, arguing it is unconstitutional. The lawsuit was filed in Common Pleas Court, but lawyers for the plaintiffs are asking that the state Supreme Court take up the case. They are seeking an injunction to stop the city from collecting the tax, which goes into effect Jan. 1. "The Supreme Court will doubtlessly decide the case eventually," said Shanin Specter, the attorney representing the 10 plaintiffs.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Editor's note: This story's online headline has been changed to reflect the correct amount of tax revenue. The city's coffers received an estimated $3 billion in tax revenue, $88 million more than expected, for fiscal year 2016. The added cash was a result of an increase in home sales and job growth, according to the city controller's monthly economic report, released Monday. The report looked at June and also at the full fiscal year, which ended June 30, and compared it with five years prior.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's top two Democrats say they have reached an agreement to replenish the state's fund for road and bridge repairs by raising the gas tax, possibly breaking a political impasse that has brought construction on transportation projects to a halt. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto (D., Hudson) announced a plan Friday to more than double the gas tax to 37.5 cents per gallon while also cutting taxes on estates and retirement income for seniors, and boosting a tax credit for the working poor.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Thursday shot back at a conservative New Jersey radio host critical of his new tax plan, accusing the host of deliberately misleading listeners to "try to make yourself famous" and boost ratings. The host, Bill Spadea of New Jersey 101.5's morning show, snapped back, "Governor, it's not any more about ratings for me than it is about a nice tax-cutting headline for you. " At issue is Christie's plan to raise the state's 14.5-cent-per-gallon tax on gasoline to 37.5 cents as part of legislation to replenish New Jersey's fund for the construction and maintenance of roads, bridges, and rail lines.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey's gas tax isn't going up - at least for the holiday weekend. The Senate did not hold a vote Thursday on legislation to raise the tax to replenish the state's fund for roads and bridges, spurning a call by Gov. Christie to resolve the crisis before the fiscal year ended Thursday. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said he didn't believe there was enough support in his chamber to advance legislation, backed by Christie, that the Assembly passed this week.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
EWING, N.J. - For a good three hours Tuesday morning, the conservative radio host was filling the airwaves with invective against the proposed gas-tax hike, ripping into a deal brokered in the "middle of the night" by Gov. Christie and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto. Then, during a commercial break from Bill Spadea's four-hour morning show on New Jersey 101.5 FM came some interesting news: The governor had reached out to the station's news director. "That was the first time in six years Christie has ever called me to say, 'What should I do about this?
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
WALL, N.J. - Gov. Christie, back on the stump in New Jersey Tuesday for the first time since launching his unsuccessful presidential bid a year ago, found himself pitching an unfamiliar cause: a tax increase. But the Republican governor had potential tax cuts to promote, too. He told the crowd gathered for a town-hall-style meeting in a Monmouth County library about a deal that cleared the Assembly early Tuesday to hike the gas tax - to replenish the depleted fund for transportation projects - and shave a point off the sales tax. "I've never signed a tax increase in seven years as governor.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers left the Statehouse on Monday without a deal to replenish the state's depleted fund for roads and bridges, but are negotiating a possible gas tax hike in exchange for a reduction in the sales tax. Throughout a marathon legislative session, being held before the fiscal year ends Thursday, top lawmakers dashed in and out of meetings with Gov. Christie, who seemed intent on crushing any attempt by lawmakers to override his...
NEWS
June 23, 2016
ISSUE | TAXES Alter abatement tax Cheers to architecture columnist Inga Saffron for casting a light on what has become a tax boondoggle - the 10-year real estate tax abatement. ("With soda tax done, let's retool abatement," June 17). Philadelphia has one of the most liberal, untargeted abatements in the nation. As Saffron points out, historic and vintage buildings that define neighborhoods are destroyed to obtain the abatement, and the public school system is deprived of tens of millions of dollars in critical funding.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney might have persuaded City Council to support a tax on sweetened beverages. But in the end what could matter most is if his lawyers can persuade the courts. Minutes after Council passed the unprecedented per-ounce levy Thursday, the beverage industry vowed to continue a fight it has already poured more than $5 million into by filing suit. Kenney wasn't rattled. "We're ready," he said. But a particularly qualified voice says Kenney shouldn't be so confident. Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald Castille has called the tax unconstitutional.
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