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Sales Tax

NEWS
March 14, 1990 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Florio has prepared a budget that cuts state spending to the bone and increases the sales tax, but top Democrats have asked him to delay any such tax increase until it can be packaged and sold as an element in a broader strategy of tax revision. Florio's plan for his first budget calls for a two-phase process under which the state would immediately increase the sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent and broaden its reach to include paper products, according to several sources familiar with the proposal.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
City Finance Director Betsy C. Reveal planned to ask City Council today to consider some new taxes - including a city sales tax - as a means of raising the $67 million Mayor Goode says is needed to balance the 1989 fiscal operating budget. Her address before Council was to come during the first public hearing on the budget. Today's hearing began with testimony from the mayor's new Office of Transportation. New taxes Reveal is offering for review include the sales tax, along with levies on professional services, by-the-glass liquor sales, video poker games and unearned income, such as interest on savings.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | By Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Straight-arming conventional wisdom that ambitious politicians should keep their distance from tax increases, Councilman George R. Burrell Jr. announced yesterday that he favors a real estate tax boost for the School District, a regional sales tax for SEPTA, and other measures to improve city finances. Burrell said he opposes a $65 million wage tax increase sought by Mayor Goode, so his package appeared to fall far short of the new revenues that Goode says are needed for the budget year starting July 1. But Burrell, a potential mayoral candidate next year, still stuck his neck out farther on the tax issue than any other City Council member has so far. "Any real solution to the city's fiscal problem must include the one element that everyone is trying to duck, and that is, additional revenues," Burrell told a gathering of about 100 politically active business people, campaign advisers, civic leaders and the news media.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
What a difference eight little words make. Last week, City Council was accused of introducing a bill that jeopardized the money raised from Philadelphia's extra 1 percent sales tax, a desperately needed source of revenue for the schools. The legislation staked out Council President Darrell L. Clarke's position: The extra sales tax revenue, expected to be about $137 million next year, should be split evenly between the school district and the city's public employee pension system.
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
With six weeks left to pass a budget, City Council on Thursday finally introduced long-expected legislation to extend Philadelphia's extra 1 percent sales tax. In the first year, the bill would devote $120 million to the schools, money the district has been counting on to help close a huge funding gap. Any extra revenue would go to the public-employee pension system, which is about $5 billion underfunded. But over the next three years, the pension system's share of the revenue generated by the additional penny in the sales tax - which in 2015 is expected to bring in an extra $137 million - would steadily increase, until the fourth year, when it would be split evenly between the schools and the city.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Skeptics say there's no such thing as a "temporary" tax. Like the two-year property tax increase City Council passed in 2010 that, lo and behold, is still with us. Or another dreaded levy: the wage tax. It was passed in 1939 as a short-term fix for the city's finances, but succeeding generations have nonetheless been forced to accept its bite in their paychecks. The latest tax under consideration for immortality is the 1 percent sales-tax increase the state allowed Philadelphia to impose in 2009 as a bridge through the recession.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
DAN ROITMAN, chief executive of the Center City -based Stroll, is no fan of the Marketplace Fairness Act, the so-called Internet sales-tax bill expected to be voted on in the U.S. Senate on Monday. The legislation would empower states to reach beyond their borders and compel online marketers - like Stroll - to collect state and local sales taxes for online purchases. The sales taxes then would be sent to the state where a shopper lives. Stroll is an Internet-based marketing platform that sells audio language-learning products and had more than $80 million in revenues last year.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Another measure to raise the state sales tax in Philadelphia has quietly been slipped into the legislative hopper. State Rep. Dwight Evans, D-Philadelphia, said yesterday he sponsored the measure as part of a package of bills to raise new revenue for Philadelphia and introduced it without fanfare to avoid the criticism similar attempts have received from state political leaders. "I thought it was important not to have a lot of posturing and to get the issue within the process and have it considered seriously," Evans said.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Democratic legislative leaders are considering boosting the state sales tax from 6 to 6 1/2 percent and removing the current sales tax exemption on gasoline bought at the pump. The plan, one of many under review to address state budget woes and a $1 billion deficit, could help Philadelphia by producing more money for SEPTA. If enacted, the tax increase would mean: $355 million in new revenue earmarked for mass transit statewide, about $250 million of which would go to SEPTA.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
MAYOR NUTTER has been sounding the alarm about the dire consequences if the state fails to enact legislation to help the city balance its budget. Nutter wants to increase the local sales tax from 7 percent to 8 percent and reduce contributions to the city pension fund, both of which would generate about $700 million in revenue over five years. Both need approval from the Legislature. State Sen. Dominic Pileggi, who leads the GOP in the state Senate, has said there will be no action on Nutter's proposals until there is a state budget.
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