CollectionsSales Tax
IN THE NEWS

Sales Tax

NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
GOV. CORBETT AND the Legislature have done just about all they're going to do to save Philly's cash-poor school district, and that includes dedicated funding from an extension of the 1 percent sales-tax increase. But, that approach isn't necessarily something with which elected officials locally agree. The sales tax, which was slated to expire in June, was raised from 7 percent to 8 percent in 2009 to aid the city during the recession. That extra percentage increase brings in about $143 million.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council President Darrell L. Clarke said Tuesday that he was pushing a plan to divide the city's now-permanent extra 1 percent sales tax between the perpetually underfunded schools and the public employee pension system. That idea clashes with part of a state rescue package for city schools, which would have directed nearly the full amount of the extra sales-tax revenue - about $120 million - to the schools, starting July 1, 2014. But city leaders have been eyeing that money for the pension system, which was less than half-funded in 2012.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
PART OF GOV. Corbett's so-called rescue plan for the Philadelphia school district involves funding that city lawmakers had their eyes on to fix an equally vexing problem - the drastically underfunded pension. Corbett's plan included funding earned through the extension of a 1 percent sales-tax increase, which had been set to expire in June, but city lawmakers say they had been considering the tax as a way to help the city from sinking under ever-increasing pension costs. "I think the pension problem is as diffreicult and challenging as the school district problem is," Council President Darrell Clarke said Monday.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Skeptics say there's no such thing as a "temporary" tax. Like the two-year property tax increase City Council passed in 2010 that, lo and behold, is still with us. Or another dreaded levy: the wage tax. It was passed in 1939 as a short-term fix for the city's finances, but succeeding generations have nonetheless been forced to accept its bite in their paychecks. The latest tax under consideration for immortality is the 1 percent sales-tax increase the state allowed Philadelphia to impose in 2009 as a bridge through the recession.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
AS CITY COUNCIL President Darrell Clarke declared yesterday that the city has done its part to solve the school-funding crisis, Gov. Corbett and state and city officials were moving closer to a deal that could send up to $100 million to the struggling district. Sources cautioned, however, that securing a sum that high would be an uphill climb and that no plan had been finalized. Discussions included potentially diverting a portion of the 1 percent increase to the sales tax the city enacted in 2009, increasing state charter-school reimbursements or finding other revenue streams, according to sources, who said a more realistic figure would be closer to $66 million.
NEWS
June 5, 2013
If New Jersey doesn't buy vacant land now, it will be gone in two decades. That's when geographers predict it will become the first state designated as "built out. " That means no room for new structures, just impervious surfaces diverting storm water into basements, or worse. Before that happens, New Jersey voters should have a say in whether they must live in an overdeveloped state where rainstorms bring the threat of destruction and death. Voters should decide whether the state dedicates more public funds to preserving open space and lessening the impact of flooding.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - A proposal to let voters decide whether to direct a fraction of sales-tax revenues toward land preservation for the next 30 years cleared another hurdle Monday when a Senate committee signed off on legislation to put the question on the ballot this November. Land-use experts and preservationists were nearly unanimous in their support. Preservation proponents have long sought a stable, long-term funding source for open-space acquisitions, which include farmland, historic sites, and properties that repeatedly flood.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
DAN ROITMAN, chief executive of the Center City -based Stroll, is no fan of the Marketplace Fairness Act, the so-called Internet sales-tax bill expected to be voted on in the U.S. Senate on Monday. The legislation would empower states to reach beyond their borders and compel online marketers - like Stroll - to collect state and local sales taxes for online purchases. The sales taxes then would be sent to the state where a shopper lives. Stroll is an Internet-based marketing platform that sells audio language-learning products and had more than $80 million in revenues last year.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate moved closer Thursday to passing a bill to tax purchases made over the Internet, but a final vote was delayed until members return from a weeklong vacation. Although opponents hope senators will hear from angry constituents over the next week, they have a steep hill to climb to defeat the bill. The Senate voted, 63-30, to end debate, setting up the final vote May 6. That vote will require only a majority, so 14 supporters would have to flip to stop it. President Obama supports the bill, but it faces an uncertain fate in the House, where some Republicans consider it a tax increase.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff WriterwalshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
Need a reason to drink? How about improving the futures of Philadelphia's school kids? Mayor Nutter and City Council are rarely on the same page these days, but the possibility of increasing the "liquor by the drink" tax to help pay for the School Reform Commission request last week for $60 million seems to be gaining traction on both sides. City Council President Darrell Clarke has pledged support for increasing the tax, which now adds 10 percent to your bar tab (on top of the sales tax)
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|