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Sales Tax

NEWS
March 5, 2015
GOV. WOLF'S plans for Pennsylvania are a little like plans for a one-way trip to Mars. Not everybody's ready to sign up. Bold? Sure. Forward-looking? You bet. But like that Mars-or-bust business, pretty expensive, extremely ambitious and unlikely to fly. This is not to say Democrat Wolf's big ideas are bad: Cut the wage tax, cut property taxes, raise the minimum wage, cut business taxes and freeze tuition at state universities. And surely these plans meet Democrat Wolf's favorite self-describing adjective: "different.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Though Gov. Wolf has been working behind the scenes for weeks on his first budget blueprint for the state, legislators and others say his real work is only just beginning. Wolf is scheduled to unveil his multibillion-dollar spending plan at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday before a joint session of the legislature. By all accounts, it will contain several bold - and controversial - proposals, including a package of tax increases and new taxes at levels that haven't been seen in years.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
However history remembers Mayor Nutter, it won't be as a tax warrior. His administration has seen increases in Philadelphia's sales tax, property tax, parking tax, hotel tax, and business use and occupancy tax; the introduction of a city cigarette tax; a suspension of wage-tax reductions; and unsuccessful efforts to raise the tax on alcoholic drinks, create a tax on soda, and even impose the amusement tax on lap dances. The attempted "pole tax" on strippers aside, taxation isn't a sexy subject for those hoping to succeed Nutter.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's odd what people recall, but Jeff Westphal, 53, remembers staring at a chopping block in his kitchen when an insight hit him with such force that he changed his entire approach to business. Westphal, chief executive of his family-owned, 900-employee tax software company, Vertex Inc., had come home on a Friday 18 years ago, enthusiastic about taking his family - including three kids, then all under age 6, on an impromptu family camping weekend. His wife objected. Casting her as a stick-in-the-mud, he began his usual approach - a mix of convincing and cajoling.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
THERE WAS celebration locally last week when Gov. Corbett signed the bill allowing Philadelphia to increase the tax on cigarettes by $2 a pack. Mayor Nutter praised the governor and the Legislature for finally taking action. Schools Superintendent William Hite added his thanks. No one did high-fives, but there was a sense of satisfaction over a mission accomplished. The situation reminds us of the title of the 1960s novel Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me . The cigarette tax - which will raise the price of a pack by 30 percent - will provide a source of continuing revenue for the financially battered school district.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
RONNIE Polaneczky's recent column on our ongoing fight to help Philadelphia does little to help those of us fighting to give Philadelphia schools the tools needed to open on time. Instead of enlightening readers on the difficulties we face in educating Philadelphia's 200,000 students, Polaneczky chose to attack the wife of House Majority Leader Mike Turzai as part of an overall assault on the Pennsylvania House of Representatives as we worked to pass enabling legislation for Philadelphia City Council to levy a $2-per-pack cigarette tax to help fund our city's schools.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
CONGRESS could soon face an unpleasant task if it wants to extend a law that bans state and local governments from taxing residents to browse the Web. The current law, last renewed in 2007, expires Nov. 1, days before midterm elections. If the law isn't renewed, broadband users would see connection fees similar to those appearing on monthly cellphone bills. So what's Congress doing about all this? The House passed a bill July 15 to permanently ban any Internet-access taxes. But when the bill got to the Senate, things soon got very interesting.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Bad tax habits An additional $2 tax per pack of cigarettes would be a huge mistake ("Endless summer," July 10). Such a tax would add more than $700 a year for a one-pack-a-day smoker. Yes, it would encourage some smokers to quit or reduce their habit. But most would suck it up; such is the addictive grip of smoking. Instead of enacting a more fair and equitable increase in the income tax, or even the sales tax, the smoking tax also would be highly regressive.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE MARLBORO Man and Joe Camel helped push into legislative limbo a new $2-per-pack tobacco tax in Philly that would help to fund the city's public schools. Harrisburg lobbyists for the nation's largest cigarette company, the Altria Group - maker of the Marlboro, Parliament and Virginia Slims brands - initially had opposed the tax altogether. A lobbyist for the nation's second-largest cigarette company, R.J. Reynolds - maker of Camel, Pall Mall and Kool brands - also was involved in the effort.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
AFTER THE Legislature passed a bill last week giving Philadelphia the right to impose a $2-a-pack cigarette tax to raise money for the city's schools, Gov. Corbett took a moment to congratulate himself. "We have worked for over a year, above the partisan politics, to put the students of Philadelphia first," Corbett told reporters. We don't know whether to laugh or to cry. In fairness, we don't know exactly what the governor means by putting the students of Philadelphia first.
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