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Salesman

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NEWS
January 19, 1998 | By Mark Fazlollah and B.J. Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer George Anastasia contributed to this article
REPUTED mob leader Joseph S. "Skinny Joey" Merlino seemed to have a dream job. The owner of a Philadelphia home-repair company testified in 1993 that Merlino worked for him as a telemarketer and could earn as much as $2,000 from a single phone call to generate sales leads. Anthony Valenti, owner of American Window & Siding Inc., a contractor active in the federal Title I program, told U.S. District Judge Norma Shapiro that Merlino was so valuable, the company had given him a shiny new Infiniti.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
On the surface it seems impossible: A self-employed latex salesman with no apparent income and a wife with a part-time job, living in a $230,000 Main Line home, with $300,000 in mortgage loans, $100,000 in credit card debt - and thousands left over to support a topless dancer in the cash equivalent of a Wonderbra. How did Craig Rabinowitz do it? The answer, according to a financial expert and documents in the Main Line murder case, is a combination of business acumen, salesman's cunning and credit.
NEWS
June 28, 1986 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Twelve days ago, during a political function, City Councilman Leland Beloff called a reporter aside to air a beef. Beloff admonished the writer for publishing a profile of his legislative assistant, Robert Rego, which included statements an undercover FBI agent had made about Rego during a federal perjury trial in April. The agent, Ronald J. Moretti, said Rego was recommended to him as someone who could funnel cash to organized crime figures from a casino junket business. The business was never formed; Rego was never implicated in any wrongdoing in that trial; and Rego was quoted as saying the testimony was "unsubstantiated.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
Whitemarsh police have charged a Maple Glen salesman with forgery. Edward M. Munyan, 37, of the 1400 block of Patrick Court in Maple Glen, was charged after his employer, Ken Mattis, the owner of Diversified Leasing Inc., 511 Germantown Pike, was told May 12 by Fidelity Bank that his secretary's signature had been forged on a $1,000 check. Munyan will have a preliminary hearing at 10 a.m. today before Lafayette Hill District Justice Katherine Speers on charges of forgery, unauthorized taking of an auto and theft by unlawful taking.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
A 42-year-old insurance salesman was found guilty of robbery and theft yesterday for trying hold up a Willow Grove gas station with his son's unloaded BB gun. John O'Hara, of Grant Avenue in Warminster, was convicted by Montgomery County Court Judge Anita Brody in the June 1 incident - in which the $300 O'Hara tried to steal never left John's Sunoco station at Easton and Mill Roads. O'Hara was no match for the two gas station attendants, who wrestled him to the ground, hit him with a stick, "popped him upside his head" with the child's gun and held him until police came.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Anthony P. "Tony" DeRosa, a retired Philadelphia Gas Works salesman who spent most of his adult life in service to others, died Saturday. He was 70 and lived in South Philadelphia. Tony DeRosa was a salesman for PGW for 35 years before retiring about five years ago from the Broad and Tasker streets office. Lorraine DeRosa, his niece, was raised in the narrow streets of South Philadelphia, where a double-parked auto can lead to serious and occasionally physical confrontations.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Linwood Tomlinson Bates, a traveling salesman who hit the road for more than 35 years with a sample case and a smile, died Dec. 14. He was 69 and lived in St. Augustine, Fla. Bates worked for a number of companies throughout the country and won awards for his salesmanship. In what many consider the toughest kind of sales - walk in off the street with a display case and a pitch - he never burned out because he believed in what he was doing, said his daughter, Evelynne Stoklosa. Born and raised in Camden during the Depression, Bates spent much of his time working to help the family.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services are to be held tonight for Joseph F. Rupertus, an advertising salesman for the Daily News and Inquirer, who died Friday. He was 51 and lived in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. Rupertus went to work for the Daily News in the national advertising department in 1966 and in 1971 transferred to retail advertising as a sales representative. He worked there until September, when the two newspapers combined their advertising departments. A man of varied interests, he was a classical music and opera buff, a gourmet cook, wine expert, dog lover, writer and humanitarian.
NEWS
August 28, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Bohannon, 76, formerly of Springfield, Delaware County, a retired salesman and singer with an Irish folk band, died of prostate cancer Monday at his son Michael's home in West Chester. From 1976 until 2005, Mr. Bohannon sang and played bass with Irish Mist. The band performed in local bars and restaurants, including O'Hara's Dining Saloon and Smokey Joe's in West Philadelphia, Toland's in Norristown, and Fiddler's Green in King of Prussia. "We were the musicians. He was the singer and entertainer and told the corny jokes," said his son John, a guitarist with the band.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
John F. Higgins, 59, a salesman who played classical piano, died Nov. 26 at his home in Wayne. Throughout his career, Mr. Higgins was a salesman for Philco Corp., and the ESB Co., and he was a purchasing agent for the Air Force, all in Philadelphia. Born in Abington, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1953 from Lehigh University, where he majored in business. Upon graduating, he served two years in the Army. Mr. Higgins lived in Wayne for 11 years. He had moved to St. Davids in 1961, the same year he married the former Jane Fletcher in St. Patrick's Church in Malvern.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University basketball coach Fran Dunphy recalled John C. "Butch" Gleason as "one of those kindhearted guys who want to do good for others. " Mr. Gleason and Dunphy graduated as classmates in 1970 at La Salle University. Dunphy noted that he is one of six coaches in Philadelphia "who stage many events over the course of a year" as part of the Coaches vs. Cancer program. It is a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches "to raise funds and awareness," its website states.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
In his memoir, Timebends , Arthur Miller writes of his first marriage, to Mary Slattery: "There was a deep shadow then over intermarriage between Jews and gentiles. . . . I was struggling to identify myself with mankind rather than one small tribal fraction of it. " And so Willy Loman was Everyman, not EveryJew. Until now. Under Lane Savadove's direction, EgoPo's passionate production of Miller's classic Death of a Salesman reimagines the Lomans as a Jewish family. The production starts with sitting shiva after Willy's suicide, making the entire play a backward look.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin R. Stenson, 71, of Springfield, Delaware County, a longtime insurance salesman and active community worker, died Sunday, Sept. 14, of Alzheimer's disease at his home. Mr. Stenson attended St. Thomas More Boys' High School in Philadelphia, where he forged many of his lifelong friendships. He graduated in 1952 and then served in the Army. In 1960, he was hired as a salesman with Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. His office was first in Bala Cynwyd and later in Springfield. He stayed with the firm for almost 40 years.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walton S. Sweeney Jr., 71, of Del Webb at Lake Oconee, a retirement community in Greensboro, Ga., a former Medford resident and South Jersey salesman, died Saturday, Sept. 13, of heart failure at St. Mary's Good Samaritan Hospital in Greensboro. A former member of the New Jersey chapter of the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, Mr. Sweeney was a direct descendant of John Morton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. "He was very proud of his lineage," his wife, Renee, said.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TALK ABOUT devotion! David McAllister and his family would travel 130 miles round-trip every Sunday from their home in Sinking Spring, Berks County, to South Philadelphia to attend church. But to be fair, David did warn the pastor of Solid Rock Baptist, at 19th and Federal, that he probably wouldn't show up if the Eagles were playing. Why the long trek to church? "He felt it was important to stay close to the community where he grew up," said his wife, Georgette. "And he wanted his family to be role models for the children of the old neighborhood.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael F. Newell Jr., 93, of Westmont, a career salesman in Philadelphia, worked in Catholic ministries in his spare time for decades. "Four of his sisters were nuns and one of his brothers was a Jesuit priest," Mr. Newell's son, Stephen, said. "His whole family was very involved in serving in the Catholic Church. " On Monday, May 19, Mr. Newell died at Kennedy University Hospital in Stratford. On Tuesday evening, his passing was marked in an unusual setting, said a friend, Jack Callahan, a member since 1996 of the New Jersey Governor's Advisory Council on Volunteerism and Community Service.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Bower, 81, of Berwyn and Juno Beach, Fla., a career salesman whose passions in life were golf, flying, and family, died Sunday, April 27, of cardiac arrest at a hospital in Jupiter, Fla. Mr. Bower began a 30-year career with International Business Machines Corp. in 1957 as a salesman in Philadelphia. He traveled to Europe, South America, and Asia in support of IBM's international business before retiring in 1987 as the director of operations, Asia Pacific Group. But Mr. Bower's lifelong passion was golf.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Chuck Cahn looks quite comfortable behind the big desk in the big office. "I really enjoy it," says Cahn, a personable father of three and grandfather-to-be who's in his third year as mayor of Cherry Hill, South Jersey's signature suburb. Cahn was a political neophyte ("I had no idea what I was getting myself into") when prominent Democrats persuaded him to leave a leisure-laden early retirement behind and run for mayor in 2011. "I'm a businessman at heart," he says. "And I feel like I'm running a business" again.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MARTY CHAVIS told his daughter that he would live to 100. Last Monday, he called his daughter from his home in Sarasota, Fla., and told her what a great time he had had at a friend's 100th birthday party. But the next day, Marty died. He was 91. Maybe Marty didn't fulfill his promise to his daughter, but he was everything a father should be, she said. "He was the best," his daughter, Debbie Rubin, said. "He was always there, with unconditional love. I was an only child, and he always encouraged me to achieve in whatever I undertook.
NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terrence J. Woods, 84, of Haddon Township, a salesman for his family's stationery supply firm in the 195os and 1960s, died of cardiac arrest on Wednesday, Jan. 8, at his home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Woods grew up near Third and Snyder Streets and graduated from Southeast Catholic High School in 1947. He was an Army infantryman who served in combat during the Korea conflict, niece Patricia Zinsser said. His brother, James, and two friends from military service in World War II had opened Philadelphia Stationery Co., which sold "everything from large office equipment down to pencil sharpeners," Zinsser said.
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