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Salman Rushdie

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NEWS
April 21, 1992 | By PAUL MULSHINE
Salman Rushdie came to America recently and did an excellent job of convincing the media that he is a hero in the struggle for freedom. Even the Inquirer Editorial Page staff fell for his act, terming him "a martyr to free speech and democratic ways," and castigating the Bush administration for ignoring him. Fair enough. But dig a little deeper and you'll see that what we really have here is a comedy being mistaken for a tragedy. Salman Rushdie is no hero. He's an idiot. A fool.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, Reuters, Newsday, the New York Times, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Salman Rushdie and his wife, Marianne Wiggins, in hiding since Feb. 14 when the now-departed Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini called for his head over the novel The Satanic Verses, have split, it was announced yesterday. Wiggins, herself a novelist, has been separated from Rushdie for four weeks, her publisher said, adding: "She is not prepared to discuss the matter further. " Wiggins, an erstwhile resident of Lancaster County and 1965 grad of Manheim Township High School, had just published her novel, John Dollar, when the death sentence fell upon her husband.
LIVING
January 14, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
THE MOOR'S LAST SIGH By Salman Rushdie Pantheon. 435 pp. $25 Like a certain diminutive tin drummer imagined by Gunter Grass, Moraes "Moor" Zogoiby, narrator of Salman Rushdie's extravagantly concocted new novel, must be believed to be seen - as well as heard and understood. "Six foot six in a country where the average male rarely grows above five foot five," born to his dashing artist-mother after her pregnancy of only 4 1/2 months, afflicted with a deformed "tree-stump" right hand and an accelerated-aging disease that makes him look and feel twice his age, this heir to one of India's great fortunes requires advice - not to mention indulgence - from the start.
NEWS
March 10, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses author once hunted like an animal after a fatwah was issued against his life by Iranian religious leaders, is now in charge of the PEN. That would be PEN the international writers' organization, which has named the Indian-born writer president of the PEN American Center. PEN supported him while he was on the run. "I'm very grateful for what PEN did, and it's nice to put something back in," Rushdie said. Rushdie, 56, said he aims to attract more young people to PEN and to focus more on concerns within the United States: "We've spent a lot of time highlighting abuses from all over the world, and now I think it's appropriate to look at what's going on in this country.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Salman Rushdie, in hiding a week short of a year, almost delivered a public talk in London, but at the last minute gave in to the warnings of bodyguards. His lecture, denouncing religious fundamentalism that denies freedom of expression, was delivered by playwright Harold Pinter. About 200 people were searched and allowed into the Institute of Contemporary Arts for the speech, which was kept a closely guarded secret. "I must apologize for this," wrote the novelist condemned to death by the late Ayatollah Khomeini, for the novel The Satanic Verses.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
IMAGINARY HOMELANDS Essays and Criticism, 1981-1991 By Salman Rushdie Granta Books/Viking. 432 pp. $24.95 Two years ago, the world's toughest book critic took on Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses. In a scenario familiar to literary editors, freelancer Ayatollah Khomeini savaged his subject so excessively - call it shooting yourself in the fatwa - that he turned his hated novelist into a household name. But even an ayatollah can't work miracles. He couldn't turn a serious, Indian-born British intellectual into a household voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
In the cramped office of his Random House publicist, Salman Rushdie sits alone before tall stacks of his ninth novel, Shalimar the Clown (Random House, $25.95). The rectangular piles form a kind of mini-skyline as Rushdie, Kong-like behind them, does his duty. Signing. There will always be signing. It's what counts for heavy lifting in the generally cerebral life of a mainstream author - the little touch aimed at forging a personal bond between writer and reader. Just one sign of normality.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
The security sideshow that has long accompanied Salman Rushdie now seems almost genteel, like a once-bustling Victorian household downsized and suffering from empty-nest syndrome. At the appointed time for an interview, a lone go-between for his powerful literary agent, Andrew Wylie, meets a reporter and photographer in front of the Cafe Europa on West 57th Street, just steps from Wylie's offices. She leads the unlikely hit team to that easily surmised setting for the scheduled hourlong chat.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marianne Wiggins wears her isolation casually now, like something unpleasant grown familiar. She can even have a small laugh about it. "I joked for a while that I was the only woman in Britain who could freely admit that her husband was having an affair," she said one day last week. "That was because it was called the Rushdie Affair. " But the joke turns sour: "They called it the Rushdie Affair - he wasn't even a person. " It is more than a year since Ayatollah Khomeini issued his infamous fatwa, or religious decree, calling on the faithful to seek out and assassinate Indian-born novelist Salman Rushdie.
NEWS
March 11, 1989
In a letter by Gilbert E. Doan Jr., published last Saturday, a word was inadvertently changed and his meaning misstated. After commenting that few supporters of high moral standards have not been insulted by published writings, Mr. Doan said: "There are, therefore, millions who, though they are appalled and disgusted by the likes of (Ayatollah Ruhollah) Khomeini, have no trouble understanding his outrage" in the Salman Rushdie matter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013
Film New This Week: Midnight's Children (*** out of four stars) Deepa Mehta's adaptation of Salman Rushdie's novel tells the parallel stories of Saleem (Satya Bhabha) and his subcontinent. Born in 1947 as India and Pakistan become independent, his colorful, partitioned turbulent life mirrors his nation(s). 2 hrs., 6 mins. No MPAA rating (brief nudity, discreet sex, violence) - Carrie Rickey Music James Blake. James Blake caused a stir with his 2010 self-titled debut when he took lessons learned as a dubstep DJ producer and applied them to a sensitively soulful singer-songwriter approach.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE WEEK'S other major novel-to-screen project is "Midnight's Children," with a screenplay by Salman Rushdie, who wrote the prize-winning book. It's a sprawling, whimsical epic about the partition of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh in 1947 that had me wondering if Rushdie is an "X-Men" fan. The title characters are children born at the stroke of midnight on the date of Britain's abdication - they arrive the same moment as the newly minted nations, and because of it, are magically blessed with special powers.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
 M AYOR NUTTER hobnobbed with the stars on Tuesday night at the Time 100 gala, honoring the hundo people the weekly magazine deemed influential. Beyonce and Jay-Z (who made the list) bailed on the party, so Nutter was clearly the next best thing. I hear the mayor chatted it up with Oprah 's BFF and "This Morning" co-host Gayle King , Padma Lakshmi of "Top Chef," Vice President Joe Biden , White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett , U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice and all-time great actress, activist and Marian Anderson award winner Mia Farrow . The gala didn't make it onto the mayor's itinerary for Tuesday, though, and the only tweet Nutter sent out that day read, "In NYC w/ @joshk & @bobmoul meeting w/ investors & entrepreneurs to promote Philly & #StartupPHL," which got me curious.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emma Watson , familiar to fans of the Harry Potter film series as the boy wizard's brainy gal pal Hermione Granger, denies media reports that bullying chased her out of Brown University. In a statement on her website Friday, the British thesp said her decision to take the spring semester off had "nothing to do with bullying. " Fact, nobody has ever bullied her, she says - at Brown or elsewhere. The accusation "seems beyond unfair," she adds. Media reports of the bullying were attributed to an anonymous Brown "insider.
NEWS
June 26, 2008 | By Caroline Berson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
East can be West can be East. At least it can in Salman Rushdie's latest novel, The Enchantress of Florence, a chronicle of two journeys, one to Florence and one to India. The novel, like its Indian-born creator, begins in the East. Rushdie's own journey - which includes a knighthood bestowed by Queen Elizabeth II yesterday - brings him to the Free Library of Philadelphia at 7 tonight to promote his latest work. The Enchantress begins in the 16th century and features the Mogor dell'Amore, a storyteller with an enchanting tongue.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
INTERESTED in sinking your teeth into speculative real estate? An heir of Romania's former royals put "Dracula's Castle" in Transylvania up for sale yesterday. The Bran Castle, perched on a cliff in central Romania, is a top tourist attraction because of its ties to Prince Vlad the Impaler, whose cruelty inspired Bram Stoker's 1897 novel, "Dracula. " Legend has it that Vlad, who made Guantanamo seem like preschool, spent one night in the 1400s at the castle. Oh, but what a night.
NEWS
October 8, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
World-renowned author, essayist and free-speech advocate Salman Rushdie has been granted a five-year appointment as distinguished writer in residence in the English department at Atlanta's Emory University beginning in the spring. "Salman Rushdie is not only one of the foremost writers of our generation, he is also a courageous champion of human rights and freedom," Emory president James Wagner said. The Indian-born Booker Prize winner, a virgin to academe, also has donated to Emory his archive, which includes journals, letters, notebooks, photographs, and manuscripts of all of his writings, including two early unpublished novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
In the cramped office of his Random House publicist, Salman Rushdie sits alone before tall stacks of his ninth novel, Shalimar the Clown (Random House, $25.95). The rectangular piles form a kind of mini-skyline as Rushdie, Kong-like behind them, does his duty. Signing. There will always be signing. It's what counts for heavy lifting in the generally cerebral life of a mainstream author - the little touch aimed at forging a personal bond between writer and reader. Just one sign of normality.
NEWS
March 10, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses author once hunted like an animal after a fatwah was issued against his life by Iranian religious leaders, is now in charge of the PEN. That would be PEN the international writers' organization, which has named the Indian-born writer president of the PEN American Center. PEN supported him while he was on the run. "I'm very grateful for what PEN did, and it's nice to put something back in," Rushdie said. Rushdie, 56, said he aims to attract more young people to PEN and to focus more on concerns within the United States: "We've spent a lot of time highlighting abuses from all over the world, and now I think it's appropriate to look at what's going on in this country.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
More noted names have tales to tell about air travel. Four days before the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the FAA reportedly banned author Salman Rushdie from boarding any flights to or from the United States. Rushdie, who lives in London and was in Houston the day of the attacks, was beginning a tour to promote Fury, his newest book. Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini set a bounty on Rushdie's life after the publication of his 1988 novel The Satanic Verses. The death edict was lifted three years ago, however, and Rushdie has been freely appearing in public.
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