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Salome

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If you were offended by the poster - well, the opera itself probably won't make you blush after all. At least, not this particular production of Salome. The Opera Company of Philadelphia's take on Strauss' first astonishing leap in stylistic individuality opened Wednesday night at the Academy of Music. The now-altered Rafal Olbinski poster was hung on the Locust Street side of the hall - its figure of poor Salome still enduring the humiliation of having had red-chiffon veils stapled over her nipples and crotch.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Suicide, murder, sexual obsession, drunkenness and abuse. How does that strike you as a lesson plan for school children? Students in private and parochial schools in the Philadelphia area have been studying the lessons to be learned from Richard Strauss' opera, "Salome," which is currently being presented by the Opera Company of Philadelphia. Salome - the title character - is one nasty piece of work. She persuades poor Narraboth, who is in love with her, to ignore his duty - but is totally indifferent when he commits suicide.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When it's all that it can be, the 100-minute musical volcano known as Richard Strauss' Salome goes to a place of barely contained frenzy in its story of a princess who desires John the Baptist right down to his severed head. The Philadelphia Orchestra's season-ending, mostly staged version Thursday went a step beyond, often seeming without restraint. That usual space between the music and its listener often vanished - as with Herbert von Karajan's live performances and, more recently, those of Gustavo Dudamel and Yannick Nézet-Séguin on good days.
NEWS
March 17, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Two new hits in two weeks. How often has that happened at the Metropolitan Opera? Never, in my memory. The March 1 opening night of Don Giovanni was greeted with well-earned shouts of approval for Marthe Keller's intelligent production. And on Monday, a wall of happy noise greeted soprano Karita Mattila in a new production of Salome. She isn't the only thing to cheer about in a smart, modern-dress production that, like the new Giovanni, may not wear well over time. But right now, it's just dandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Next season's previously announced performance of Salome , Richard Strauss' erotically charged biblical opera based on Oscar Wilde's play, will be a coproduction of Opera Philadelphia and Philadelphia Orchestra, the two groups announced Monday. It is the first in a series of anticipated collaborations between the organizations, though leaders could not say exactly where the sharing of resources might lead. "This one's all about getting something started," said Opera Philadelphia general director David B. Devan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
IN A HISTORIC and pioneering move, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia will combine forces for the first time. Their vehicle is Richard Strauss' searing "Salome," which requires four major voices to soar over the massive orchestral scoring. "Salome" had been announced as next season's Orchestra closer, but this coproduction with Opera Philadelphia heightens the interest for the audiences of both organizations, and promises to be the first of other diverse collaborations in the future.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Next season's previously announced performance of Salome , Richard Strauss' erotically charged biblical opera after Oscar Wilde's play, will be a co-production of Opera Philadelphia and Philadelphia Orchestra, the two groups announced Monday. It is the first in a series of anticipated collaborations between the organizations, though leaders could not say exactly where the sharing of resources might lead. "This one's all about getting something started," said Opera Philadelphia general director David B. Devan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1995 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Cynthia Makris has sung the title role of Salome in bib overalls, in a wedding gown, and in a peep-show window. But tomorrow night, when the curtain opens for the Opera Company of Philadelphia's production of the Richard Strauss opera, she'll be playing this title character straight. As straight as you can play a teenage virgin who lusts after a holy man - even after she's gotten him beheaded. Makris has sung so many versions at so many performances of the biblical character, originally turned into a femme fatale by playwright Oscar Wilde, that she's not about to tell you just how many.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1994 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Technical problems created by the Academy of Music's dual use as concert hall and opera house have stymied the Opera Company of Philadelphia's previously announced production of Salome, March 6-16. The Richard Strauss opera will be presented at the Academy at that time, but not in the staging conceived for German director Dieter Dorn. The opera, which already has played in Strasbourg, France, and Lisbon, Portugal, was intended as a three-way co-production with Strasbourg Opera, the Opera du Rhin and the Opera Company of Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Three previously unknown Oscar Wilde items have surfaced in the Free Library of Philadelphia's rare-book collection and are being greeted by scholars and aficionados as perhaps one of the most important Wilde discoveries in decades. The emergence of a typescript of the play Salome hand-corrected by Wilde, a 142-page personal notebook in which he drafted poems and doodled line drawings, and an unpublished four-page manuscript from his famous poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol have put the Free Library at the center of a happy storm of attention.
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NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Three previously unknown Oscar Wilde items have surfaced in the Free Library of Philadelphia's rare-book collection and are being greeted by scholars and aficionados as perhaps one of the most important Wilde discoveries in decades. The emergence of a typescript of the play Salome hand-corrected by Wilde, a 142-page personal notebook in which he drafted poems and doodled line drawings, and an unpublished four-page manuscript from his famous poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol have put the Free Library at the center of a happy storm of attention.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. - Though well past the shelf life of the greatest Broadway dancers, Chita Rivera, 81, is now playing a one-legged woman - but not because she has to. The minute she takes her curtain call after The Visit at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, the walking stick is gone, her step has bounce, and her presence has fire - all unneeded for her icy assignment in this deliciously nasty John Kander/Fred Ebb musical, based on Friedrich Dürrenmatt's...
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When it's all that it can be, the 100-minute musical volcano known as Richard Strauss' Salome goes to a place of barely contained frenzy in its story of a princess who desires John the Baptist right down to his severed head. The Philadelphia Orchestra's season-ending, mostly staged version Thursday went a step beyond, often seeming without restraint. That usual space between the music and its listener often vanished - as with Herbert von Karajan's live performances and, more recently, those of Gustavo Dudamel and Yannick Nézet-Séguin on good days.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'The moon has a strange look tonight . . . she is like a mad woman who is seeking everywhere for lovers . . . the clouds . . . clothe her nakedness but she won't let them . . . she reels through the clouds like a drunken woman. " And that's only a scene-setting speech in Oscar Wilde's lurid telling of how Princess Salome used her sexual wiles, amid the night sky, to bring about the execution of John the Baptist - magnified to the nth degree by Richard Strauss' scandalous music. Often presented in concert versions (by the Vienna Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony this spring alone)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
IN A HISTORIC and pioneering move, the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia will combine forces for the first time. Their vehicle is Richard Strauss' searing "Salome," which requires four major voices to soar over the massive orchestral scoring. "Salome" had been announced as next season's Orchestra closer, but this coproduction with Opera Philadelphia heightens the interest for the audiences of both organizations, and promises to be the first of other diverse collaborations in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Next season's previously announced performance of Salome , Richard Strauss' erotically charged biblical opera based on Oscar Wilde's play, will be a coproduction of Opera Philadelphia and Philadelphia Orchestra, the two groups announced Monday. It is the first in a series of anticipated collaborations between the organizations, though leaders could not say exactly where the sharing of resources might lead. "This one's all about getting something started," said Opera Philadelphia general director David B. Devan.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Next season's previously announced performance of Salome , Richard Strauss' erotically charged biblical opera after Oscar Wilde's play, will be a co-production of Opera Philadelphia and Philadelphia Orchestra, the two groups announced Monday. It is the first in a series of anticipated collaborations between the organizations, though leaders could not say exactly where the sharing of resources might lead. "This one's all about getting something started," said Opera Philadelphia general director David B. Devan.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The singularity of opera star Hildegard Behrens' life was summed up by the circumstances of her death. At age 72, well past typical soprano retirement age, Ms. Behrens had been planning a recital and master class in Japan when, feeling unwell, she checked into a hospital Sunday, suffering from an aneurysm from which she died Tuesday. No doubt she grieved over canceling. "I'm a long-distance singer," she told The Inquirer six years ago. "The longer the better. " Ms. Behrens was widely considered the most magnetic Wagnerian soprano of her time - not just for her singing, but for her acting as well - and enjoyed a stable family life in Washington, where she lived for many years with her husband and two children.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opera stars often hit a peak early on, and spend the rest of their careers trying not to disappoint a world that witnessed it. So when Deborah Voigt delivers one performance after another that her fans didn't dare anticipate a decade ago, you see why she's adored unceasingly, and rarely more than at Thursday's concert performance of Strauss' Salome with the National Symphony Orchestra here. Oh, I know, she's singing at the Academy Concert and Ball next Saturday - the sort of one-off appearance that allows singers to work with the Philadelphia Orchestra but not on the voice-taxing consecutive days of subscription concerts - in a program including choice arias and duets.
NEWS
September 5, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The hardest-working musician on the Philadelphia Orchestra's European tour is also the least seen, and, to add irony upon irony, the most watchable. That's Marisol Montalvo, the visually alluring soprano whose star has ascended before the orchestra's eyes - first in late 2004 at the Kimmel Center and Carnegie Hall, and now on the European tour. (Only Sunday was there a notable glitch: She and the orchestra were to be televised Sunday from Royal Albert Hall, but fire there canceled the concert.
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