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BUSINESS
December 8, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. is searching for the "NutraSweet of salt. " Salt enhances the flavors in products - without it they just don't taste the same. But it also can be a health hazard, particularly for the large portion of the population suffering from high-blood pressure. "The problem is that nothing else tastes like salt," said James T. Heimbach, head of the consumer-research staff of the Food and Drug Administration. Added Larry A. Carpenter, senior marketing manager of Campbell's soups division, which uses a lot of salt: "No one has been able to come up with a substitute as good as salt.
NEWS
July 20, 1986
In a letter to the editor (July 7), a writer states: "Current estimates of the gay population in the United States range from 20 million to 30 million. " The writer gives no source for the estimates. When sources are not given, one should take the estimates, such as the writer gives, with a big grain of salt. Out of the approximately 240 million population in the United States, approximately 57 million are singles (never marrieds, widows, widowers and divorced people) 18 and older.
FOOD
August 9, 2013 | By Michelle Dembo, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 200 Chinese takeout restaurants in the city's poorest neighborhoods - most with kitchens behind bulletproof glass - are participating in a program to reduce the salt in their cooking, according the City Department of Public Health. In an effort to lower high blood pressure, and, in turn, the number of heart attacks and strokes, the health department is partnering with Temple University's Center for Asian Health, the Asian Community Health Coalition, and the Greater Philadelphia Chinese Restaurant Association to encourage some of the city's 400 Chinese takeout restaurants to use less salt.
FOOD
February 15, 1989 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. I recently took the instructor course for the American Red Cross' "Better Eating for Better Health. " The teacher said that salt heats up the water. When cooking pasta, it says right on the package to add salt at the beginning of cooking time. I had always thought that adding salt was to prevent boiling over. What's the real purpose? - Colette Abell APO, N.Y. A. The purpose of adding salt to pasta water is to enhance the taste of the pasta, which is rather bland without it. Although salt will not prevent boiling over, it is a heat conductor and will shorten the length of time it takes to bring water to a boil.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The East Pikeland Board of Supervisors awarded a $21,694 contract to Robert McComsey Tuesday night for a salt shed to be built to the rear of the township building on Rapps Dam Road. The Department of Environmental Resources now requires that salt be sealed in sheds to prevent it from leaking into the ground and killing plant life, said board President Barbara Appleman. The township has been storing salt for the winter outside in a pile on a platform, she said. In other business, the supervisors: Said they would write to the Genuardi Supermarket in the new Maple Lawn Village Center on Route 113 about neighbors' complaints that noise from the store's trash compactor wakes them up in the middle of the night.
FOOD
July 22, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I have several recipes calling for salt pork (stews, chowders, etc.), which I cannot find in my local supermarkets. Is there a substitute? - Mrs. D.G. Salt pork comes from the fatty belly of the pig. It is heavily salted (hence its name) and can be kept in the refrigerator for four to six weeks. I usually substitute bacon for salt pork. The bacon contributes a different flavor, since it is smoked and salt pork is not. Personally, I prefer using the bacon to the salt pork since I find the smoky flavor of bacon more attractive and interesting in these dishes, though purists may object.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The squeaky taxpayers get the salt. That's one way the city Streets Department determines where to send salt trucks, after first making sure that major streets are cleared to accommodate heavy traffic and public transportation. "We've had thousands of complaints already and as long as we get complaints, we keep responding," said Kevin Koch, acting chief of highway engineering for the Streets Department. Koch said his office has received a number of calls from residents in northwest Philadelphia who complained that their streets had not been salted.
NEWS
May 25, 2009 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
As everyone knows, too much salt, or not enough, is no good. Salt, the dance by Anne-Marie Mulgrew & Dancers Company, premiered at the Painted Bride over the weekend. Salt, by the tubful and drifting down from the fly, was supposed to be part of the program, but there was too much concept and too little salt - only 100 pounds - not enough for what ought to have been a spectacle. Getting a dance from conception to rehearsal to premiere is no easy task in today's economy, and taking on a big subject on a small dance company's budget is fraught with pitfalls.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
Eight days after it said it was adding salt to many of its soups to enhance their taste and the company's sales, Campbell Soup Co. on Wednesday tweaked its message for consumers - this time, emphasizing choice. The Camden company said it will continue to sell lower-sodium soups, juices and sauces, including some new varieties. "It's vital we provide people with a choice," said Denise Morrison, Campbell chief operating officer, who will become chief executive on Aug. 1.       - Paul Schweizer
NEWS
December 9, 1997 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
This winter may be warmer than usual, or it may have heavier snowfalls. It depends on which El Nino prediction you believe. New Jersey officials are going with the worst-case scenario in making preparations for keeping main roads clear. Officials have 150,000 tons of salt on hand for the state's 10,700 lane-miles of interstate and state highways - close to the maximum 158,000-ton storage capacity, said Dave Brown, New Jersey Department of Transportation spokesman. Salt stocks "have increased significantly in recent years," prompted by the ice storm of March 1994, and the great Blizzard of 1996, Brown said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What is it?: Salt water taffy is that chewy sweet treat that comes in an abundance of flavors, from simple chocolate or vanilla to newfangled ones like sour cherry and wild banana, and lollipop colors wrapped up in twisted-end waxed paper. Boxes of it touting various vacation locales on the outside are as common as souvenir gifts as fruitcakes at Christmas. How it found its way to New Jersey: The lore at the Jersey Shore is that salt water taffy was invented by Atlantic City Boardwalk confectioner David Bradley.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
MEAT and potatoes offer a hearty entry into the big-eating, rib-sticking world of chef Ben Ford.   STANDING RIB ROAST For the roast: One 7-bone standing prime rib roast (16 to 18 pounds), trimmed and tied 10 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened Kosher salt and fresh coarsely ground black pepper For the jus: 2 cups red wine 10 fresh thyme sprigs 2 fresh rosemary sprigs 2 cups veal or beef stock 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper To prepare the roast, remove it from the refrigerator 30 minutes prior to cooking time and preheat the oven to 450°F.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Make room, violet and honeybee. Share the stage, goldfinch. New Jersey may soon have a new state symbol, and how sweet it is. The Assembly's Tourism, Gaming, and the Arts Committee released a bill Thursday that would make salt water taffy the official state candy. Making a persuasive case for honoring the Shore staple were fifth graders from Samsel Upper Elementary School in Sayreville, a community greatly damaged by Hurricane Sandy, who made the trip Thursday to Trenton. They proposed the state sweet to Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski (D., Middlesex)
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
UNION FORWARD Maurice Edu scored in the 90th minute to give Philadelphia a 2-2 tie with Real Salt Lake at PPL Park on Saturday. Andrew Wenger, acquired last week in a trade with Montreal, opened the scoring for the Union (1-1-4) in the 55th minute, assisted by Vincent Nogueira. Union goalkeeper Mac MacMath made five saves against Real Salt Lake (2-0-4). "We played some good soccer throughout the game," Union manager John Hackworth said. "We possessed the ball, went side to side and made them do a lot of work.
TRAVEL
March 17, 2014 | By John Rosenberg, For The Inquirer
BOGOTA, Colombia - As a globe-trotting adult, I've tended to err on the side of caution and have learned to approach overly novel attractions with a great deal of hesitation. Such was the case on a recent visit to Bogota, Colombia, when against all restraint I kept thumbing back to a dog-eared page in the guidebook referencing a so-called Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira, situated in an underground salt mine about 30 miles north of the capital. To prompt myself into finally hazarding Bogota's paralytic traffic so as to discover if the cathedral was worth its salt as a destination, I first had to channel a bit of Clark Griswold, goading his kids into the family car to make time to see the world's second-largest ball of twine as they made their way to Wally World.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Angelo Fichera, Melanie Burney and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
A lingering snowstorm that dumped a foot of snow on parts of southern New Jersey over the last two days played havoc with public transportation, caused scores of accidents, and forced the closing of schools, universities, municipal offices, courts and major shopping malls. More snow - another 2 to 5 inches in some places overnight - was expected to complicate the area's Friday commute and further cut into salt supplies depleted by a series of winter storms. On Thursday, more than a foot of accumulation was recorded in Pennsauken while other communities such as Cherry Hill and Camden reported just under 12 inches, National Weather Service officials said.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Allison Steele and Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writers
In Delaware County, some townships are waiting for road-salt deliveries that were supposed to arrive weeks ago. Officials in Northampton, Bucks County, paid a trucking company to bring in salt from a neighboring town rather than risk a late delivery. And in Chester County, where 12 municipalities face a critical salt shortage, the deputy director for emergency management, Robert Kagel, said the state Department of Transportation told him to "be creative. " After back-to-back snowfalls and a catastrophic ice storm that froze roads, downed power lines, and paralyzed the region last week, officials and residents are facing new challenges as they brace for another fierce storm that is expected to start just before midnight Wednesday.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCILMAN Jim Kenney is trying to avoid rubbing salt in the wounds of those who put their feet to the pavement on snowy days - and that includes friends of the four-legged variety. Kenney introduced a resolution yesterday that asks the streets and services committee to hold public hearings to investigate the use of rock salt - which the city has used since the 1940s - to melt ice and snow in the wintertime. "What I've seen in the city this snow season is just the dumping of salt all over the place, regardless of how much we really need to break down the snow," he said.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The man who died Thursday after a pile of road salt collapsed on him in a Bucks County storage facility was a married father of two from Mount Laurel, Burlington County. Gustav J. Propper, 51, was "an amazing father and a true family man," according to a brief statement released by his family Friday. "Everything he did was for his family. It's extremely tragic, and we're just beyond words," the statement read. Propper was operating a front-end loader for International Salt, a Lackawanna County-based company that has a storage facility at the Kinder Morgan Port of Bucks County, on the Delaware River in Falls Township.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
FALLS TOWNSHIP The man who died Thursday after a pile of road salt collapsed on him in a Bucks County storage facility was a married father of two from Mount Laurel, Burlington County. Gustav J. Propper, 51, was "an amazing father and a true family man," according to a brief statement released by his family Friday. "Everything he did was for his family. It's extremely tragic, and we're just beyond words," the statement read. Propper was operating a front-end loader for International Salt, a Lackawanna County-based company that has a storage facility at the Kinder Morgan Port of Bucks County, on the Delaware River in Falls Township.
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