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Salt And Pepper

FOOD
March 27, 1991 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
One of the secrets to flavorful cooking is probably in your refrigerator right now! I'm talking about your jar of mustard, lurking in the dark reaches of the fridge. At only five calories a teaspoon, mustard adds a sweet, sharp flavor that wakes up just about any dish - without being intrusive. CHICKEN DIJON 8 chicken thighs 1 1/2 cups dry white wine 1 tablespoon brown, prepared mustard Small bay leaf Generous pinch of thyme Salt and pepper, to taste 8 small (or 4 medium)
FOOD
November 21, 1990 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
The season of heavy eating is upon us, and for all the warnings about the dietary dangers of high-calorie, high-cholesterol, high-fat and high-sodium foods, we simply don't want to give up our favorite holiday foods. So let's try to balance those indulgences with some lighter fare. A thoughtful hostess will slip in at least one lighter dish, something that the health- or weight-conscious guest can eat without guilt. And even non- dieters will appreciate a new taste complement and some less-heavy food options in the traditional meal.
FOOD
November 21, 1990 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
In my opinion, one of the best things about Thanksgiving is creamed onions - not just the pungent, richly sauced vegetables themselves but the reminder that onions are a vegetable, worthy of being enjoyed in their own right. There's nothing obscure about onions; no seasoning is more ubiquitous. But when it comes to enjoying them for themselves alone, after onion rings, all is silence. It shouldn't be that way. Onions are not only delicious; they're easy to prepare (especially if you use big ones instead of those little white numbers)
FOOD
November 7, 1990 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to the Inquirer
Potatoes are cheap, plentiful and easy to prepare, yet most of us never take advantage of their potential. We think of them as an afterthought; the sidekick to a steak, the filler in corned beef hash. Ignoring an international array of potato recipes, we mindlessly repeat the same baked and boiled potato dishes. The following 50 recipes are designed to help you escape that rut. They include baked, fried, sauteed and roasted. Although a few recipes for sweet and red-skinned potatoes are included, most call for russet potatoes.
FOOD
May 2, 1990 | By Bev Bennett, Special to The Inquirer
The nice thing about pineapple is that it's there all year round to remind you of nice weather. If the weather really is warm, it's just the thing to refresh. But if it's the dead of winter, it can remind you of the nicer weather to come. It's also versatile. Sliced, it makes a great breakfast fruit, as an alternative to oranges or grapefruit. But its sweet-tart taste also makes it an excellent relish for a meat dish. Pineapple Salsa is a perfect match for pork, ground beef or turkey.
FOOD
November 15, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Leopard spots, zebra stripes, safari jackets - this season fashion has gone wild! With everybody dressing up like the invasion force from Banana Republic, can culinary trend-watchers fail to follow? We predict that the next "hot cuisine" will be out of Africa. African dishes are relatively high in natural fiber and low in fat, saturated fat and calories. These spicy seasoned dishes are appealing despite their lack of added salt. AFRICAN POPPED RICE SALAD 1 cup uncooked brown rice 2 cups boiling water 2 fresh peaches, peeled, pitted and cubed 1/2 cup orange juice 1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped 3-ounce jar pimentoes, drained and chopped 3 tablespoons each: chopped fresh parsley and sliced scallions Optional: 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 cup plain non-fat yogurt 1 to 3 teaspoons curry powder, to taste Salt and pepper, to taste Wash and drain rice.
FOOD
July 12, 1989 | By Merle Ellis, Special to the Daily News
The other day was my Mom's birthday. She was 39 again for the 39th time. We had her over for dinner. One of Mom's favorite dishes is chicken breast sauteed in butter and served with julienne strips of country ham in a light lemon sauce. We decided to fix that for her birthday dinner. Neva, my wife, did the shopping. I hit the ceiling. She bought two packages of "3 chicken breast halves with ribs" (in fine print) for $2.79 a pound. "These things are half garbage," I declared sternly, and they are a pain to bone out. You should have bought whole fryers!
FOOD
May 14, 1989 | By Karen Gillingham, Special to The Inquirer
Once you've peeled the garlic cloves, there is no faster recipe for chicken breasts than the classic French formula for whole roast chicken with 40 cloves of garlic. The dish makes an especially good choice for Mother's Day dinner because the children, instead of Mom, can peel the garlic. Garlic is easiest to peel when first flattened with the side of a chef's knife (for safety, youngsters might best use a heavy cup or even a meat mallet or hammer to nail the garlic). Alternatively, the cloves can be dropped briefly into boiling water.
FOOD
May 3, 1989 | By Karen Gillingham, Special to The Inquirer
Pasta with a quick-cooking sauce can be the meat, so to speak, of a speedy but satisfying meal. The meat in the sauce for the pasta idea that follows is chicken, along with some walnuts and rosemary. In the time it takes to bring a pot of water to a boil and cook the noodles in it, you can brown bite-size pieces of chicken breast that have been dredged in flour, fresh rosemary and garlic. The pan is then quickly de glazed with white wine before adding chicken broth to make a reduction sauce that is finished with cream and toasted walnuts, then the chicken and noodles.
FOOD
December 23, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The L.L. Bean Book of New New England Cookery (Random House, $22.50) is as close to the land as the famed Maine outdoors outfitter and as urbane a melting pot as metropolitan Boston. Food authors Judith and Evan Jones join forces in this huge cookbook that features traditional Yankee cooking along with contemporary and more sophisticated cuisine of New England. Included are is more than 800 recipes ranging from country hearty to city light. The Joneses have put together a collection of recipes garnered from years of eating in private homes throughout New England as well as in restaurants.
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