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Salt And Pepper

FOOD
September 18, 1994 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine a quick and convenient way to make everything from swordfish steaks to chicken breasts taste flavorful. And, as a bonus, it's relatively low fat. The secret is a marinade called adobo, as essential to Cuban cooking as olive oil is to Greek cooking. Basically it's a mixture of seasonings, garlic and sour orange or lime juice, in which the food is coated rather than soaked. In Steven Raichlen's Miami Spice (Workman Publishing), the author refers to adobo as a "fragrant paste of garlic, salt, cumin, oregano and sour orange or lime juice that is Cuba's national marinade.
FOOD
April 17, 1994 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rice, beans and chorizo usually add up to a delicious, long-simmering stew or soup. However, the mix is also excellent when served cold as a salad. The base of this salad is chorizo, the spicy Mexican sausage. Other uncooked spicy sausage, crumbled into small pieces, can be substituted. The key to success when using sausage is to cook it thoroughly and drain it completely before mixing it into the other ingredients. Otherwise, it will be greasy and unpalatable. Complete the Tex-Mex accent of this entree by adding cilantro, scallions and sweet red peppers.
FOOD
December 29, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Homemade soups are nourishing and fiber-rich. They're very versatile and can be virtually fat-free . . . great to store in your freezer for anytime meals. They're particularly appealing when the weather turns chilly. Some slim ideas: KALE OR SPINACH TURKEY SOUP 1 teaspoon salad oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 cup chopped onion 2 tablespoons water 3 cups fat-skimmed turkey broth 1/2 pound kale or spinach, chopped Red pepper sauce or flakes, to taste Optional: salt and coarse pepper to taste 1 cup cooked diced turkey meat Combine oil and garlic in a non-stick pot. Cook over moderate heat for 1 minute, then add onion and water.
FOOD
September 29, 1993 | By Marcia Cone and Thelma Snyder, FOR THE INQUIRER
During our high school days, hot and spicy flavors weren't as popular as they are now, but both of us sought out hot dog stands that featured their own blends of "hot relish," a mixture of hot and sweet peppers to slather on those dogs. On recent return visits to our homes, we found that some of the stands we had frequented were still in business - and as good as we remembered. Yes, the hot dog might be the plain old steamed variety, but it loses all identity with liberal use of relish - which tells us that we really don't need the hot dogs to savor some very good relish.
FOOD
February 17, 1993 | By Helen Witty, FOR THE INQUIRER
In their infinite variety, beans are almost uncountable, particularly when the bean category is understood to include such other legumes as peas and lentils. Which is fortunate, now that this worldwide staple of ingenious and low- cost cookery is glowing ever brighter as a luminary of the Age of Good Nutrition we're enjoying. Old recipes are being dusted off, ethnic ways investigated, and inventiveness put to work, all in aid of the once-lowly bean and its cousins. Apart from breakfast, any meal of the day can be a bean feast.
FOOD
December 2, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
You probably have in your kitchen right now something that Columbus was looking for. Cinnamon! It was the search for an easier way to get cinnamon, and other exotic spices, that led European explorers into uncharted waters and ultimately to discover the Americas. Did you know that most of the cinnamon we get isn't cinnamon at all, but cassia? Cinnamon and cassia are the dried inner bark of two related evergreen trees in the laurel family. True cinnamon is tan, while cassia is a darker reddish brown, and the more strongly scented of the two. NORMANDY SPICED CHICKEN & RAISINS 2 chicken breasts, split 4 tablespoons raisins (preferably golden)
FOOD
September 16, 1992 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rib-eye steaks topped with a peppery-tasting watercress-butter mixture become even more special when accompanied with a bean mixture called Texas Caviar. STEAK WITH WATERCRESS-SHALLOT BUTTER 1 medium shallot, minced 1 tablespoon minced watercress 4 teaspoons butter, softened 2 small 1-inch-thick rib-eye steaks (each 5 to 6 ounces) Olive oil Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste Blend together shallot, watercress and butter in bowl. Shape into ball or block and place in freezer while preparing steaks.
FOOD
September 4, 1991 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
During Rosh Hashanah, which begins at sundown onSunday, Jews throughout the world enjoy certain foods that are symbolic of the new year. Slices from a round challah, or braided egg bread, are dipped in honey to insure a sweet year. Another traditional dish is tzimmes, a concoction of carrots, sweet potatoes and prunes that is served as a side dish. Rich roast capon, brisket of beef or chicken are the usual fare. But with the weather so warm, and especially since Rosh Hashanah falls so early this year (much too hot for matzo ball soup)
FOOD
August 18, 1991 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Picnics always should be casual and unpretentious. Fuss over them and all the fun goes out. But if they're done with an air of romance and simple elegance, you'll find that there are few styles of entertaining that are more enjoyable. Delicious picnics can be put together in less than an hour with ingredients that most of us have on hand - and the fare doesn't have to be cheese sandwiches and burgers. More elaborate alfresco meals should take no more than a quick shopping trip and a morning in the kitchen.
FOOD
March 27, 1991 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
One of the secrets to flavorful cooking is probably in your refrigerator right now! I'm talking about your jar of mustard, lurking in the dark reaches of the fridge. At only five calories a teaspoon, mustard adds a sweet, sharp flavor that wakes up just about any dish - without being intrusive. CHICKEN DIJON 8 chicken thighs 1 1/2 cups dry white wine 1 tablespoon brown, prepared mustard Small bay leaf Generous pinch of thyme Salt and pepper, to taste 8 small (or 4 medium)
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