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Salt Marsh

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NEWS
June 30, 1990
As his autobiography shows, Benjamin Franklin was involved in some episodes of juvenile delinquency, but somehow the escapades of Young Ben and his gang seem different from the more mindless misdeeds of our time. This selection was made by Roy Goodman, research librarian of the American Philosophical Society. I was generally a leader among the boys, and sometimes led them into scrapes, of which I will mention one instance. . . . There was a salt marsh that bounded part of the mill pond, on the edge of which at high water we used to fish for minnows.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This town is no longer for the birds. The people, however, are still arriving in flocks. For some reason, the thousands of herons, ibises and egrets that yearly come here to nest at the bird sanctuary have not appeared this year. The reason is unknown, but naturalist Christopher Bennett has some theories. Bennett works at the Wetlands Institute, a nonprofit research and educational organization in a salt marsh just outside this resort town. The bird sanctuary is across the bridge in Stone Harbor.
NEWS
May 31, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The joke persists that mosquitoes should be New Jersey's state bird, and the sliver of land at the bottom of the state is a prime breeding ground, especially after a warm, rainy spring. But scientists are prepared to fight the mosquito this summer season with myriad techniques: Rhode Island Red chickens, stink water, and traps that resemble contraptions in a Road Runner cartoon. Bordered by bay and ocean, Cape May County's 53,000 acres of salt marsh - which attract migrating birds - are the largest mosquito habitat at the Shore.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid all the destruction and havoc along the Atlantic Coast during Hurricane Sandy, quiet carnage was taking place in South Jersey's marshes. Few noticed. Fewer still, in all likelihood, cared. But in birding circles, the ramifications have been huge. As the storm surge rose, the waters flooded the underground burrows of two signature marsh species - tiny furry things, the meadow vole and rice rat. Naturalists later found an astonishing number of their little corpses in the high-water "wrack line" of marsh grasses and other detritus left by the storm.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As Tom Kerr guided the family car over the bridge into Sea Isle City for the start of a summer vacation, the first thing his two young daughters noticed was the boat that could take them on a cruise to see whales, dolphins and seabirds. It was all the children talked about while they played on the beach during their first few days in town. And when the chance to board the 65-foot Princess came Thursday, they took one of the daily morning trips that carry 150 people through the back bays and along the oceanfront in search of marine life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | By Joe Daly, Special to The Inquirer
When folks who knew him when would ask him why he had given up the rod and reel, Capt. Rich George would give them a look. "I had a quota on seabass and weakfish," he'd say, "and I filled it. " It was a line good for a laugh - if no one thought about it too long. Before he got into the cruise business, George spent 17 years steaming out of Sea Isle City early every morning with a boat full of red-eyed fishermen. He'd run to the wrecks offshore for the bass and ling, or lay up near the beach when the weakfish were running.
NEWS
August 31, 2003 | By John Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
San Francisco Bay is that special thing called an estuary, a place where the sea enters the land, and rivers enter the sea, where freshwater mixes with saltwater, where deep and shallow waters, mudflats and marshes nourish fish, shellfish, harbor seals, and millions of migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Large estuaries are rare on the West Coast of the New World, making this one biologically precious. The bay is also the site of great cities, a nodal point of global commerce, and the home port of a major fishing fleet.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Tall, thin grass and finger-shaped waterways provide a tranquil setting, the peacefulness interrupted only by the screeching laughter of gulls that stifles the sounds of nearby trucks, cars and speedboats. To the unsuspecting eye it's just another grassy, muddy area. But the secrets of the salt marsh lie ready for discovery at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor, a short drive from the Garden State Parkway. A safari along a 100-foot pier and along an elevated marsh boardwalk reveals starfish, fiddler crabs and sea lettuce, and even diamondback terrapins.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The view from Great Island is spectacular. On the undeveloped island sits a grand $83 million two-story structure resembling a cross between a shopping mall and a dynamic, futuristic work space. It is the new Atlantic City High School, scheduled to open some time next month. It will combine a nouveau form with the goal of training students for careers while making them feel good about themselves and the work they do, according to Ernest Harper, the principal. "This school will be more than just bricks and mortar," Harper said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid all the destruction and havoc along the Atlantic Coast during Hurricane Sandy, quiet carnage was taking place in South Jersey's marshes. Few noticed. Fewer still, in all likelihood, cared. But in birding circles, the ramifications have been huge. As the storm surge rose, the waters flooded the underground burrows of two signature marsh species - tiny furry things, the meadow vole and rice rat. Naturalists later found an astonishing number of their little corpses in the high-water "wrack line" of marsh grasses and other detritus left by the storm.
NEWS
May 31, 2004 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The joke persists that mosquitoes should be New Jersey's state bird, and the sliver of land at the bottom of the state is a prime breeding ground, especially after a warm, rainy spring. But scientists are prepared to fight the mosquito this summer season with myriad techniques: Rhode Island Red chickens, stink water, and traps that resemble contraptions in a Road Runner cartoon. Bordered by bay and ocean, Cape May County's 53,000 acres of salt marsh - which attract migrating birds - are the largest mosquito habitat at the Shore.
NEWS
August 31, 2003 | By John Hart FOR THE INQUIRER
San Francisco Bay is that special thing called an estuary, a place where the sea enters the land, and rivers enter the sea, where freshwater mixes with saltwater, where deep and shallow waters, mudflats and marshes nourish fish, shellfish, harbor seals, and millions of migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Large estuaries are rare on the West Coast of the New World, making this one biologically precious. The bay is also the site of great cities, a nodal point of global commerce, and the home port of a major fishing fleet.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Standing next to a brown patch of dead reeds on the Cohansey River, a group of environmentalists representing 20 organizations yesterday protested the spraying of the chemical glyphosate by Public Service Gas & Electric on hundreds of acres of salt-water marshes. As part of its Estuary Enhancement Program, PSE&G is trying to control the growth of phragmites, an aggressive reed grass known as foxtail that grows up to 15 feet tall and chokes other vegetation. The company is restoring 20,500 acres of salt-water marshes in South Jersey to offset the environmental impact from its Salem 1 and 2 nuclear facilities.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The view from Great Island is spectacular. On the undeveloped island sits a grand $83 million two-story structure resembling a cross between a shopping mall and a dynamic, futuristic work space. It is the new Atlantic City High School, scheduled to open some time next month. It will combine a nouveau form with the goal of training students for careers while making them feel good about themselves and the work they do, according to Ernest Harper, the principal. "This school will be more than just bricks and mortar," Harper said.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As Tom Kerr guided the family car over the bridge into Sea Isle City for the start of a summer vacation, the first thing his two young daughters noticed was the boat that could take them on a cruise to see whales, dolphins and seabirds. It was all the children talked about while they played on the beach during their first few days in town. And when the chance to board the 65-foot Princess came Thursday, they took one of the daily morning trips that carry 150 people through the back bays and along the oceanfront in search of marine life.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This town is no longer for the birds. The people, however, are still arriving in flocks. For some reason, the thousands of herons, ibises and egrets that yearly come here to nest at the bird sanctuary have not appeared this year. The reason is unknown, but naturalist Christopher Bennett has some theories. Bennett works at the Wetlands Institute, a nonprofit research and educational organization in a salt marsh just outside this resort town. The bird sanctuary is across the bridge in Stone Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | By Joe Daly, Special to The Inquirer
When folks who knew him when would ask him why he had given up the rod and reel, Capt. Rich George would give them a look. "I had a quota on seabass and weakfish," he'd say, "and I filled it. " It was a line good for a laugh - if no one thought about it too long. Before he got into the cruise business, George spent 17 years steaming out of Sea Isle City early every morning with a boat full of red-eyed fishermen. He'd run to the wrecks offshore for the bass and ling, or lay up near the beach when the weakfish were running.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Tall, thin grass and finger-shaped waterways provide a tranquil setting, the peacefulness interrupted only by the screeching laughter of gulls that stifles the sounds of nearby trucks, cars and speedboats. To the unsuspecting eye it's just another grassy, muddy area. But the secrets of the salt marsh lie ready for discovery at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor, a short drive from the Garden State Parkway. A safari along a 100-foot pier and along an elevated marsh boardwalk reveals starfish, fiddler crabs and sea lettuce, and even diamondback terrapins.
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