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Salvation Army

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NEWS
February 5, 1994 | Photographs for The Inquirer by Scott Rowan
The Eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware Division of the Salvation Army installed new leaders Thursday night in Plymouth Meeting. The new officers, W. Todd and Carol Bassett, both lieutenant colonels, will supervise a body of 46 area corps, or churches, with more than 5,000 members.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
Glenn Sheehan and his wife Anne Jensen want to make sure no more ex- convicts with violent backgrounds are unloaded on trusting people like themselves who participate in prison-reform programs, according to the couple's attorney, Thomas V. Hunt. Sheehan and Jensen are still recovering from injuries they suffered April 1 during a stabbing rampage at their Lower Merion Township archaeological firm. Two women who worked for them were killed, one of them allegedly after being raped.
NEWS
February 18, 1986 | By TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writer
For homeless Victor Athy, a possible shutdown of some or all of the Salvation Army's soup kitchens simply means that he will have to "move on. " The 33-year-old man and other homeless men interviewed yesterday at the Salvation Army soup kitchen at 715 N. Broad St. said they hope the Army doesn't run out of money. "I'll just go from one (kitchen) to the next if they shut them down," said Athy, who has been a regular in the soup line for the past nine months. The Salvation Army is experiencing its worst financial crisis since it began operating its four soup kitchens in January 1983, said Emily Klenk, director of community relations.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, anywhere from 40 to 60 hungry people show up at the Salvation Army's Darby Corps Community Center for a free, hot meal. But last week, any of the food program's beneficiaries who had not heard the news about the Tuesday night fire at the center were greeted by a makeshift sign announcing that the program was indefinitely postponed. The food program is just one of the social services that the Salvation Army has provided in Darby Borough.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Life was hitting James Francis hard. His wife abandoned him and the two kids. The job was going sour. Finally the electric company sent a shut-off notice. The Philadelphia native swallowed his pride and took himself to the Salvation Army. Praise God, another light bill paid. That was long ago. Francis is Lt. Francis now, married to a fellow lieutenant in the same blue-suited army, doing the Lord's work. In a Frankford neighborhood that is trying to stave off encroaching drugs and despair, he runs day-care, latch-key and senior-citizen programs, a soup kitchen, basketball leagues and music classes.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Salvation Army is on the front lines of helping the needy in the area, and a representative says the group's clientele is changing. Capt. Carl Carvill, pastor and administrator of the Salvation Army of Lower Bucks County, said the "emerging new poor" have led the organization to expand its client base. During the Christmas season, the Salvation Army distributes food baskets to needy families and invites the parents to pick out two donated toys for each of their children from a central location.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Some are stressed out. Some face an emptying cupboard or a dwindling supply of baby formula. Not yet in a flood, but in a rising stream, the families of troops sent to the Persian Gulf are calling a hot line operated by the Salvation Army in Philadelphia. "Right now, they're wanting food assistance and some help with utilities, and a lot of them need support services, such as counseling," said Maj. Shirley Cox, coordinator of the Operation Home Town Shield phone line. "We had one lady, she needed diapers," added Salvation Army spokesman Capt.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT'S DAMN NEAR impossible to get a straight answer from most of the people involved in the tragic Market Street building collapse. Even the Salvation Army. Fingers are now being pointed in the organization's direction for the first time since a four-story building crumbled on June 5 and flattened the neighboring Salvation Army thrift shop at 22nd and Market streets, killing six people and injuring 13 others. Two lawyers have claimed that the Salvation Army rebuffed requests to have protective scaffolding installed on the store's roof before demolition workers began haphazardly tearing down the property next door.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
INSTEAD OF HEEDING written warnings of a potentially catastrophic collapse, the Salvation Army played "a dangerous game of chicken" with the owner of a building being demolished next door, an attorney said yesterday. The collapse on June 5 killed six and injured 14 who were inside the Salvation Army's thrift shop at 22nd and Market streets. So attorney Robert Mongeluzzi, citing emails among the city, the demolition-site owner and the Salvation Army that showed the charity was warned of dangerous conditions, said yesterday that he would add the Salvation Army as a defendant in litigation seeking civil damages.
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NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge on Friday ordered the District Attorney's Office to let lawyers for the owner of the Center City building in the deadly 2013 collapse examine the cellphone and camera of a city building inspector who killed himself days after the tragedy. Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein gave the prosecutor's office 15 days to deliver the cellphone and a camera that belonged to Ronald Wagenhoffer, the Department of Licenses and Inspections inspector assigned to monitor demolition of several buildings in the 2100 block of Market Street.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Salvation Army officials can be asked in a deposition about the agency's net worth as well as the profitability of the thrift store at 22nd and Market Streets that collapsed in June 2013, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Mark Bernstein ruled during a hearing Monday. Sept. 6 is scheduled as the start date for a civil trial that consolidates 20 lawsuits stemming from the collapse. Six people were killed and 13 injured when the unsupported masonry wall of a four-story building that was being demolished toppled and flattened the adjoining store.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
What may be a sleepy day off for some will galvanize what organizers expect to be more than 140,000 others into helping people in need Monday when the 21st annual Martin Luther King Day of Service draws volunteers from across the region. In Chester, where the civil rights leader spent three years as a young theologian, a tribute to King and a wreath-laying ceremony will highlight a day of volunteerism at the Salvation Army's Corps Community Center on West 15th Street. At Philadelphia's Girard College, where King participated in a desegregation protest just months after being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1965, 5,000 volunteers, including Gov. Wolf, Mayor Kenney, and other dignitaries, will take part in 150 service projects.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
For three days running this week, about a dozen students and volunteers will cram into the Salvation Army's small industrial kitchen in West Philadelphia to handle 2,653 pounds of precooked turkey, 1,855 pounds of instant mashed potatoes, 1,825 pounds of stuffing mix, 1,755 pounds of green beans, 1,200 cans of gravy, 1,200 cans of cranberry sauce, and 1,200 packages of rolls. When they're done, they will have prepared nearly 4,000 Thanksgiving meals for 900 area families that otherwise would have to do without.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three months behind on his contract to demolish a four-story Center City building and frustrated by the Salvation Army's refusal to let his workers on the adjacent roof of its thrift store, contractor Griffin Campbell came up with another plan. For three nights before the deadly June 5, 2013 collapse that killed six people, Campbell had two workers take a ladder, climb atop the Salvation Army's roof, and try to reduce an unsupported three-story brick wall under cover of darkness.
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Opening statements are set for Wednesday afternoon in the Philadelphia murder trial of a demolition contractor accused of causing the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse that killed six people and injured 13. A 12-member Common Pleas Court jury and three alternates were selected Tuesday, and Judge Glenn B. Bronson and prosecution and defense lawyers will spend Wednesday morning picking two more alternate jurors for the estimated four-week-long trial....
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
It towered over its neighbors, but in 123 years, nothing so distinguished the four-story brick building at 2136-38 Market St. as the way it came down. It is 10:41 a.m. on June 5, 2013, and the sunny, late-spring morning is ruptured by the roar of falling masonry and an enveloping cloud of dust. The adjacent single-story Salvation Army thrift store, which has anchored the corner at 22d Street since 1948, disappears under debris, killing six people and seriously injuring 13. The collapse was one of the most significant events in the city's modern history, and on Tuesday, a judge and lawyers will begin selecting 12 Philadelphians who will decide whether Griffin Campbell, a 51-year-old Hunting Park demolition contractor, should be held criminally liable for what happened.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The operator of a 36,000-pound excavator working at the scene of the 2013 Salvation Army thrift store collapse that killed six people and injured 13 pleaded guilty Tuesday in a deal that could limit his prison time to 10 to 20 years. Sean Benschop, 44, pleaded guilty to six counts of involuntary manslaughter, 12 of reckless endangerment, and one of aggravated assault in the June 5, 2013, collapse of an unsupported wall that crushed the store at 22d and Market Streets. The deal with prosecutors spared Benschop a possible term of life in prison without parole had he been found guilty of multiple counts of third-degree murder.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Since the Salvation Army began serving on Camden's front lines in 1880, perhaps 100 commanding officers have headed the city corps. But the arrival of Majors Terry and Susan Wood and the departure of Majors Paul and Alma Cain is big news for the city and region. The reason is the $90 million, 120,000-square-foot Camden Kroc Center, a magnificent complex of recreational, human service, and worship facilities that has attracted 7,000 members - and a visit from President Obama - since opening in October.
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