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Salvation Army

NEWS
June 3, 1999 | By Angela Pomponio, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At the Salvation Army's 74-year-old Swede Street building, space is anything but taken for granted. Children living on the cramped, third-floor emergency housing unit must play with their toys and watch cartoons in a hallway outside the elevator. Employees' offices double as storage closets, packed with medical supplies, books and donated food items. Bunk beds in the men's shelter room are just inches apart. Tom McCaney, the Salvation Army's housing director, said the group was able to house hundreds of women, men and children each year, but future program development is hampered.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For more than 100 Christmases, the Salvation Army, with its kettles and bells, has been part of the traditional holiday scene in this region. Its basic message and program have remained mostly unaltered throughout the 20th century. "The essence of our Christmas message to all people is that God loves them, and the birth of this child offers the blessing of hope and redemption," said Maj. Carl Carvill of the Salvation Army in Norristown. The organization came to Philadelphia in 1880 and within a few short years had outposts throughout the area.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Most people's closest encounter with the Salvation Army comes when they drop a dollar into a bell ringer's kettle during the Christmas season or walk into a church-operated thrift shop looking for a bargain. Wade Mason, a 36-year-old homeless man who has participated in Salvation Army programs in Chester, knows firsthand where the money from the kettles and the thrift-store sales goes. For the last three years, he said last week, he has been a regular at the church's Stepping Stone Day Center and its winter Warming Center.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Salvation Army officials last night withdrew their plan to build a community center on Markley Street, saying they will talk to residents of the area before going ahead with the project. "The neighbors have some ideas the Salvation Army is going to do things they never intended to do," said Mitchell Miller, a Norristown-based attorney representing the agency. Two weeks ago the Borough Council granted preliminary approval to the plan, which calls for a $2.9 million center near Eisenhower Middle School.
NEWS
October 5, 1994 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Salvation Army plans to open a thrift shop on Chester Pike this month, but a flier making the rounds in Collingdale warns that what is really coming to the borough is an evil intruder: "Beware Collingdale Homeowners. Drug Rehab. Homeless Shelter. Soup Kitchen. Coming. " The author is Joseph Ciminera Jr., and, at Monday night's council meeting, he added a freewheeling verbal assault. Among his targets: the Borough Council's majority, the Borough of Darby, and the homeless.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Scrooges are alive and well in Center City. They work in the office building above Bailey Banks & Biddle, across the street from Liberty Place - and they've managed to get the city to do their grinching for them. Just ask Robert Lee and Nate Jordan, two fund-raisers for the Salvation Army who have been threatened with a $300 fine. All because of complaints that the cheerful Christmas jingles - which draw donations to their little red kettle - are too loud. "We're only playing Christmas music," said Jordan, 36, who deftly delivers holiday tunes on an electric piano while Lee, 31, rings the trademark Salvation Army bell.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Angela Pomponio, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Salvation Army officials are still searching for space to create a transitional-housing program for homeless people, with no alternative yet to a rejected location on the Norristown State Hospital grounds. Tom McCaney, the Salvation Army's emergency-housing director here, said yesterday that the organization was having no luck finding a space large enough in the area for the program. Its plan to set up transitional housing and an expanded shelter in the vacant Building 8 on the state hospital grounds was characterized as "untenable" in a Sept.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before cost overruns of the proposed Deliverance homeless shelter in North Philadelphia came under public scrutiny, and months before federal prosecutors and the U.S. Attorney's Office began culling financial records, the Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia had expressed doubts about the adequacy and safety of the facility as a family shelter. So much so that the organization pulled out as consultant for the project, according to an internal memo drafted for Gregory Rost, the mayor's chief of staff, by city housing czar Michael Nardone.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer Fashion Writer Roy H. Campbell contributed to this article
Uniformity in college fashion is a thing of the past. These days, collegiate style is as diverse as the nation's college campuses. Students at area small liberal-arts colleges tend to dress differently from students at large urban schools in the area who dress differently from students at the area's historically black colleges. Recent visits to three Philadelphia-area campuses showed that students practice "invent yourself" chic. They pull together different items to achieve a look that fits into their campus lifestyle and image.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
LENDING A HAND, Salvation Army driver Edward A. Gross loads food and supplies into a truck bound for hurricane-ravaged Charleston, S.C. Gross and others were working yesterday at the Salvation Army's office at 701 N. Broad St., where donations are being collected.
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