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Salvation Army

NEWS
December 20, 1994 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Scrooges are alive and well in Center City. They work in the office building above Bailey Banks & Biddle, across the street from Liberty Place - and they've managed to get the city to do their grinching for them. Just ask Robert Lee and Nate Jordan, two fund-raisers for the Salvation Army who have been threatened with a $300 fine. All because of complaints that the cheerful Christmas jingles - which draw donations to their little red kettle - are too loud. "We're only playing Christmas music," said Jordan, 36, who deftly delivers holiday tunes on an electric piano while Lee, 31, rings the trademark Salvation Army bell.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Angela Pomponio, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Salvation Army officials are still searching for space to create a transitional-housing program for homeless people, with no alternative yet to a rejected location on the Norristown State Hospital grounds. Tom McCaney, the Salvation Army's emergency-housing director here, said yesterday that the organization was having no luck finding a space large enough in the area for the program. Its plan to set up transitional housing and an expanded shelter in the vacant Building 8 on the state hospital grounds was characterized as "untenable" in a Sept.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before cost overruns of the proposed Deliverance homeless shelter in North Philadelphia came under public scrutiny, and months before federal prosecutors and the U.S. Attorney's Office began culling financial records, the Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia had expressed doubts about the adequacy and safety of the facility as a family shelter. So much so that the organization pulled out as consultant for the project, according to an internal memo drafted for Gregory Rost, the mayor's chief of staff, by city housing czar Michael Nardone.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer Fashion Writer Roy H. Campbell contributed to this article
Uniformity in college fashion is a thing of the past. These days, collegiate style is as diverse as the nation's college campuses. Students at area small liberal-arts colleges tend to dress differently from students at large urban schools in the area who dress differently from students at the area's historically black colleges. Recent visits to three Philadelphia-area campuses showed that students practice "invent yourself" chic. They pull together different items to achieve a look that fits into their campus lifestyle and image.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
LENDING A HAND, Salvation Army driver Edward A. Gross loads food and supplies into a truck bound for hurricane-ravaged Charleston, S.C. Gross and others were working yesterday at the Salvation Army's office at 701 N. Broad St., where donations are being collected.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
On April 1, 1988, a Philadelphia day laborer and ex-convict named Arthur Faulkner raped and murdered Clarice J. Dorner at the suburban archeological site where they worked. Faulkner then stabbed and wounded Dorner's employers, Anne M. Jensen and her husband, Glenn W. Sheehan, and stabbed to death co- worker Annaliese H. Killoran. These facts are undisputed. Faulkner, 32, was convicted by a Montgomery County jury and on July 5 was sentenced to death. Yesterday, a federal court jury began hearing evidence to determine who was responsible for placing Faulkner, a violent man already convicted of attempted rape, with a small archaeological firm where he would work side-by-side with several young women.
NEWS
October 7, 1994 | By Suzette Hackney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Daniel F. Devlin told the Borough Council Wednesday night that he would demand an apology from a Collingdale man, who he said had slandered the borough and Salvation Army in published comments. Devlin told the council that Joseph Ciminera Jr. acted irresponsibly when he attacked Darby Borough after the Collingdale Council meeting Monday night. Ciminera told the Collingdale board that he did not want a Salvation Army thrift shop to open in the borough. After the meeting, he told a reporter: "The area is close to Darby (Borough)
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Akira Suwa
Transporting holiday wishes, United Parcel Service drivers dressed as Santa yesterday, and their "elves" delivered food baskets and gifts to shelters in the city and the surrounding region. UPS volunteers also teamed up with the Salvation Army to deliver food to more than 450 needy families.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1989 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
City Councilman Thacher Longstreth drops two pair of his trademark argyle socks into a collection box yesterday, kicking off Mellon Bank's shoes-and- socks drive for the Salvation Army. Collection boxes will be in every Mellon Bank office until Feb. 3 as part of the "From Our Hearts to Their Soles" campaign. With Longstreth is army Capt. Frederick Hagglund.
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