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Sam Cooke

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NEWS
December 13, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Be thankful, this holiday season, that the new, agreeable Sam Cooke: Forever Mr. Soul is so much smarter than recently opened jukebox musicals. It has a fluid narrative, without hammering you over the head about its subject. It never throbs with phony tension, an embarrassing hallmark of one-man explorations. In this show - conceived, written and directed by Kevin Ramsey - you learn a lot about Sam Cooke, the father of soul and a pioneer for black music artists, without always hearing that he was a legend, a marvel, a hero, a god. The downside: You also get a modest production, far too modest to work at the level Forever Mr. Soul demands and deserves.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
1. Former home of Douglass "Jocko" Henderson, Emlen Street near Lincoln Drive, Germantown. One night in 1957, the legendary disc jockey was awakened by the doorbell. It was Sam Cooke, a 22-year-old gospel singer, and his manager, Bumps Blackwell, pushing Cooke's new single, "You Send Me. " As a result of the encounter, Henderson played the record and put Cooke on a show at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. Cooke soon had his first secular hit. 2. Lincoln Drive near Rittenhouse Street, Germantown.
NEWS
April 3, 1991 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
A graveside ceremony will be held at 1 p.m. today for Benjamin Alten, former owner of the legendary Club Harlem in Atlantic City. Alten, 82, who died Monday, was a lifelong resident of Atlantic City. "My father was a blue-collar guy, a white Jewish businessman running a black nightclub who was totally colorblind. He could talk to people of all races and persuasions, all on an equal level" recalled his son, Steven. Alten, with his black partner, Pop Williams, operated the club patrons called "the Times Square of Atlantic City" for 36 years, booking almost exclusively black acts, even though its audience always was racially balanced betweeen ebony and ivory.
NEWS
July 19, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Throwback soul stylist Van Hunt took his time getting started Thursday at North by Northwest. But once Hunt and his four-piece band finally crowded onto the small stage (about 45 minutes late), the Atlanta-based artist wasted no time tapping into musical roots that went deeper than the requisite Stevie-Marvin-Prince course work taught at soul's new school. He did so while drawing heavily from his superb eponymous debut, and peppering his 75-minute set with covers and quotations that suggest a record collection of serious depth.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Last night at the Tower Theater, the audience was treated to the spectacle of a man-child on the threshhold of pop's promised land. Terence Trent D'Arby, widely hailed as the next big thing, was making his first area appearance. With his baby dreadlocks flying, the doe-eyed soul singer provided ample confirmation of why he is one of the most celebrated vocalists to come along this decade. Supple and moving, the voice of this American expatriate is the genuine article, directly on the narrowing continuum from Sam Cooke to Stevie Wonder to Michael Jackson.
NEWS
March 10, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hall and Oates threw a festive stone soul picnic at the Tower Theater on Saturday night. And they provisioned it with the most surprising ingredients. The opening number was "Family Man," an obscure song from 1982's H2O LP. It was a clear indication that this performance wasn't going to be a standard salvo of the Philly-bred duo's greatest hits. Instead, they hopscotched through their legacy, setting out a garage sale of B-sides and forgotten tunes. If nothing else, the unusual set showcased the enormous range and variety of their catalog, from the Mink DeVille-like tango of "How Does It Feel to Be Back" from 1980's Voices to the Stylistics' soul of "Starting All Over Again" from 1990's Change of Season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The 21st century has not been devoid of soul crooning smoothies whose sartorial sharpness is as cutting and crucial as the Motown elite that their sound emulates. One look at Motor City-inspired R&B doyen Raphael Saadiq and 2008's The Way I See It proves as much. Fort Worth's Leon Bridges is cut from the same cloth - albeit with rougher-hewn material, as his voice shares similarities to Sam Cooke's and Marvin Gaye's silken coo with an occasional understated scratchiness. His songs, whether his debut's preponderance of wrenching ballads or its emotive heart-racers, are retro-soul without being dated and cautious.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Anders Osborne may have been born in Sweden, but since arriving in New Orleans in 1985 - where he's now part of Louisiana's firmament - he's become one of the sturdiest, much-loved voices of rough-and-tumble Americana, buoyant blues and MOR rock. Recording plucky albums like 2013's Peace , being a pal-participant to Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh, playing Ardmore Music Hall on Saturday with Amy Helm - herself, a scion and patron saint of Nu-Americana as the daughter of the late, legendary Levon Helm - all show what Osborne has become since landing in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | By Mark Marymont, FOR THE INQUIRER
Old rythym-and-blues is a hot new commodity. Many major pop and country acts have been acknowledged with elaborate compact-disc box sets, but it has taken longer for some important R&B performers to get their due. That's changing, and now you can easily find a remarkable range of long-unavailable material by '50s and '60s R&B artists. The sound of those senior singers seeps through in the blend of smooth harmonies and sweet lyrics from contemporary groups such as Philadelphia's Boyz II Men. Also recalling the golden days of R&B, when black music was a major factor on the pop charts, is All 4 One, which went to No. 1 last year with "So Much in Love," an update of the Tymes' classic 1963 hit. While the newcomers mine that deep and varied musical vein, it's easier than ever to find the real thing.
NEWS
June 13, 2008 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
With his white suit, untied bow tie, and sliding dance moves, Jamie Lidell played the part of a blue-eyed soul singer at a late show - made later by a delayed start and an incongruous opening set by the Liz Phair-like Jennifer O'Connor - at World Cafe Live on Wednesday night (and into Thursday morning). He sang the part, too, starting with the hand-clapping, toe-tapping, sax-honking burst of joy that is "Another Day. " The tall, thin Lidell slid his appealing tenor voice around the beat, adding judicious interjections and slurs, reveling in the melody's piano-driven gospel thump.
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NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Leon Bridges, the 26-year-old rhythm-and-blues singer with the 50-year-old soul, will bring his high-waisted vintage slacks and his playful-to-prayerful love songs to the July 4th Wawa Welcome America! party on the Ben Franklin Parkway. Bridges, who channels Ben E. King's "Stand by Me" and Sam Cooke's "You Send Me" every time he sings his neo-soul serenades, is a young master of old-school vulnerability. "The world leaves a bitter taste in my mouth, girl," he laments on "Coming Home," the title song on his breakout 2015 debut album, which skyrocketed him from obscurity to omnipresence on the concert circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Anders Osborne may have been born in Sweden, but since arriving in New Orleans in 1985 - where he's now part of Louisiana's firmament - he's become one of the sturdiest, much-loved voices of rough-and-tumble Americana, buoyant blues and MOR rock. Recording plucky albums like 2013's Peace , being a pal-participant to Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh, playing Ardmore Music Hall on Saturday with Amy Helm - herself, a scion and patron saint of Nu-Americana as the daughter of the late, legendary Levon Helm - all show what Osborne has become since landing in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The 21st century has not been devoid of soul crooning smoothies whose sartorial sharpness is as cutting and crucial as the Motown elite that their sound emulates. One look at Motor City-inspired R&B doyen Raphael Saadiq and 2008's The Way I See It proves as much. Fort Worth's Leon Bridges is cut from the same cloth - albeit with rougher-hewn material, as his voice shares similarities to Sam Cooke's and Marvin Gaye's silken coo with an occasional understated scratchiness. His songs, whether his debut's preponderance of wrenching ballads or its emotive heart-racers, are retro-soul without being dated and cautious.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On Thursday, when Red Bull Sound Select brought Bilal to Underground Arts with fellow soul locals Son Little and Kate Faust on the bill, the Germantowner promoted his dramatic, recent release, In Another Life , which toys with futurist funk, free jazz, Low -era Bowie touches, and late-'60s/early-'70s soul. Coming on after 11 p.m., Bilal and his quintet engaged the crowd immediately. An organ's whir and a snarling guitar accompanied him on "Love Child. " "I see your mind's made up / I see you've had enough," he howled before his background vocalists kicked in with a choral sound that could have come from Hair . "Sometimes" found Bilal singing with grit and grace.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
ANTHONY RILEY , a Philly street singer who made national news in 2007 after he was arrested for disorderly conduct for singingĀ  Sam Cooke songs in Rittenhouse Square, is going for television glory. Riley auditioned for the eighth season of NBC's "The Voice," which premieres Feb. 23. Riley at least made it to the blind-auditions phase (that's where the judges turn their chairs for the contestants they like). NBC allows contestants who have made it to this televised round to advertise that they auditioned for the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
American Idol and its ilk have taught us to regard a singer's voice the way progressive-rock fans once cooed over instrumental solos. But what made Aretha Franklin, who performed at Revel Ovation Hall in Atlantic City on Saturday night, an epoch-defining figure was not simply talent or even technique, but judgment - not the notes she could hit but when she chose to hit them. Before she was the Queen of Soul - an honorific that also serves as the title of Rhino Records' nicely remastered recent collection - Franklin spent the better part of the 1960s letting producers pair her with overorchestrated jazz and pop standards, with results equivalent to a Van Gogh painted on black velvet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Retro-soul music's been in fashion for the last decade on both sides of the Atlantic. But while there is no shortage of Stax-style soul-shouters and postmodern Motown acolytes out and about, there has been a dearth of acoustic soul revivalists bringing back the earthy 1970s vibes of such natural-born soul men as Bill Withers, Terry Callier, and Van Morrison. That's where Michael Kiwanuka comes in. The 24-year-old jazz-schooled singer and guitarist of Ugandan parentage hails from the Muswell Hill section of North London, where the Davies brothers of the Kinks grew up. Kiwanuka possesses a rich, grainy voice that communicates extraordinary calm.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2011 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
WITH THE likes of Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber and Eminem scheduled to perform at last night's Grammy Awards wing-ding at Los Angeles' Staples Center, it's understandable that Mick Jagger's first live performance at the music industry's annual orgy of self-congratulation may not have meant much to younger fans. But for devotees of classic rhythm and blues, the scheduled turn by The Most Stoned Roller of Them All (as the late Daily News gossiptista Larry Fields would have written) and Raphael Saadiq was probably the show's highlight.
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
HISTORICALLY, explosive pop-music hits like "The Twist" have rarely been created in a vacuum. Usually there's an abiding current, a big wave of interest in a style or three that numerous artists latch onto and ride for all its worth . . . until the next big craze comes along. In hindsight, 1960 can be seen as a year on the creative cusp, a time of optimism, experimentation and youthful frivolity inspired, in part, by the idealistic visions of presidential candidate (then president-elect)
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
All you have to do is watch the audience react to Elder Goldwire McLendon every time he sings to understand the profound impact he has. People get choked up. Some weep outright. Heck, just watching him perform on YouTube puts a lump in your throat. See, McLendon sings gospel. And he has for, oh, 70 years, ever since he was 9 and singing in Sunday school in Jacksonville, Fla., his hometown. He has sung in prisons, in concert halls, and at his own place of worship, Mount Olive Holy Temple in Philadelphia, where he has ministered for 40 years.
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