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Samantha Stevenson

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SPORTS
June 16, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
One day after Alexandra Stevenson was beaten in the DFS Classic, her outspoken mother was in trouble with the WTA yesterday in Birmingham, England. Samantha Stevenson took exception to a WTA display of newspaper reports, most of which related to her daughter's defeat by Nathalie Tauziat on Thursday. Stevenson ripped down the articles - an action that could lead to a WTA Tour reprimand for "vandalizing club property. " She had ruffled the WTA earlier in the tournament by asking a pianist to stop playing in a hospitality tent during her daughter's second-round win over Anne-Gaelle Sidot.
SPORTS
June 30, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The WTA needs a PTA. Only four days into the most prestigious tennis tournament in the world, the Women's Tennis Association scrambled mightily yesterday, because the outspoken parents of two players overshadowed a wonderful day of tennis, including a late match between No. 2 seed Andre Agassi and unseeded Todd Martin. Following Jelena Dokic's second-round singles victory, her father, Damir, was escorted to the All England Club's security office after accusing the WTA of being fascist and then smashing a local television reporter's telephone.
SPORTS
July 1, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You wonder how Alexandra Stevenson will recall the ninth day of Wimbledon 1999. You wonder if she'll smile while recollecting her memorable tennis victory, or cringe when she recalls what followed. Stevenson, 18, beat Wayne's Lisa Raymond in three sets to set up an all-qualifiers quarterfinal with Australia's Jelena Dokic, an unprecedented event. But even as the flashbulbs were popping, the fireworks boomed. At her post-match news conference, she was forced to defend her sportswriter-mother's comments about racism and lesbianism on the women's tour.
LIVING
July 18, 1999 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can't help but wonder about an offhand comment made by Samantha Stevenson two decades ago. She was a sportswriter trying to gain access to the Phillies locker room in 1978, in the days when women were knocking on the door of equality. They wanted access to the athletes whom only male reporters had covered for generations. What was the team's objection? "I think [then-owner] Ruly Carpenter is fighting me so hard because he thinks I'll seduce his superstars, and find out what's really going on with that team and then write the whole damn thing in some national magazine," Stevenson told The Inquirer in October 1978.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | By Debbie Woodell
Lesbian athletes are in the news again - without doing anything and without even knowing they are newsworthy. And when those lesbians have no faces and no names, you know the news cannot be good. First, lesbians were shamefully used as props by another in a long line of overprotective tennis parents. This time, it was Samantha Stevenson, mother of teen-age phenom Alexandra, who made history this month as the first qualifier in history to reach the Wimbledon semifinals. As Alexandra's profile rose throughout the fortnight, Samantha sank to old familiar levels, saying she was worried that lesbians might prey on her daughter in the locker room.
SPORTS
July 1, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The off-the-court soap opera at Wimbledon continued yesterday, but the maelstrom that began Thursday died down slightly, giving way to the action on the court. Anne-Gaelle Sidot, a French player accused by Alexandra Stevenson of saying racial epithets, vehemently defended herself after losing to Tamarine Tanasugarn, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4, in a third-round match. Although Sidot admitted she pulled Stevenson's mother's hat during an argument, she said she did so in retaliation. Samantha Stevenson, Alexandra's mother, "had insulted Anne-Gaelle just a little while beforehand," a Women's Tennis Association interpreter said after Sidot relayed her answer in French.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
DOCTOR J took the playground game indoors. Took it to a higher level. Above the rim. Flew like a condor, stung like a scorpion. Found wealth and fame in that thin air. It was different at ground level, both feet on the shifting terrain. All that gloom. All those people he loved, dying young. He has written his autobiography, with considerable help from Karl Taro Greenfeld. Calls it "Dr. J" when it could have easily been called "Julius Erving. " Slice it and balance the parts, sadness outweighs joy 60-40.
SPORTS
July 3, 1999 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The statement, four sentences, arrived via fax. Julius Erving did not want his current employers, the Orlando Magic, of the NBA, or RDV Sports, or even his attorneys to be publicly involved. Yes, he said in a telephone conversation with the Daily News yesterday, he is the father of Alexandra Winfield Stevenson, the emerging 18-year-old tennis star who became the first qualifier in Wimbledon history to reach the women's semifinals. "It's a relief, very much so [to have this out]
SPORTS
July 3, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexandra Stevenson said the whirlwind hasn't even registered on her radar screen. It's easy for an 18-year-old to say she is ignoring all the talk about an absent father and very present mother. It's much more difficult for her to play that way. Just hours before Julius Erving, the former 76ers superstar, acknowledged that he was her father, the teenager, giddy and apparently unfazed, became the first women's qualifier to reach Wimbledon's semifinals. She did so by defeating Australia's Jelena Dokic, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3, to advance to a meeting with fellow American Lindsay Davenport on Centre Court today.
SPORTS
July 4, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One week ago there were thousands of petunias, a few dozen challengers, and several tennis courts between Alexandra Stevenson and Wimbledon's Centre Court. Yesterday her mother sat in the great court's family box with Nike chairman Phil Knight and a representative of IMG, the sports-marketing giant. The 18-year-old Californian, in becoming the first qualifier to reach the semifinals here, had moved from obscurity to a tabloid-tainted fame. Stevenson's remarkable journey, as much a nightmare as a miracle, ended emphatically yesterday when third-ranked Lindsay Davenport thrashed her, 6-1, 6-1, in 47 minutes.
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SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
DOCTOR J took the playground game indoors. Took it to a higher level. Above the rim. Flew like a condor, stung like a scorpion. Found wealth and fame in that thin air. It was different at ground level, both feet on the shifting terrain. All that gloom. All those people he loved, dying young. He has written his autobiography, with considerable help from Karl Taro Greenfeld. Calls it "Dr. J" when it could have easily been called "Julius Erving. " Slice it and balance the parts, sadness outweighs joy 60-40.
NEWS
January 16, 2003 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cuddling during NBA All-Star weekend in February, Julius and Turquoise Erving were the picture of marital bliss. Who could have known that in May, Turquoise would file for divorce? Perhaps not even Turquoise herself. Admirers of the Sixer Hall of Famer and his elegant wife, married 29 years, were surprised yesterday to learn that the couple are in the midst of divorce proceedings. The news came as a double shock, accompanied by reports that Dr. J has accepted responsibility for a second out-of-wedlock child, whose mother Turquoise says lives in Orlando, Fla. Erving, now vice president of the Orlando Magic, admitted in 1999 that he was the father of professional tennis player Alexandra Stevenson, then 18. Stevenson's mother is former Philadelphia sportswriter Samantha Stevenson, with whom Erving acknowledged having an extramarital affair in the early '80s.
SPORTS
June 16, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
One day after Alexandra Stevenson was beaten in the DFS Classic, her outspoken mother was in trouble with the WTA yesterday in Birmingham, England. Samantha Stevenson took exception to a WTA display of newspaper reports, most of which related to her daughter's defeat by Nathalie Tauziat on Thursday. Stevenson ripped down the articles - an action that could lead to a WTA Tour reprimand for "vandalizing club property. " She had ruffled the WTA earlier in the tournament by asking a pianist to stop playing in a hospitality tent during her daughter's second-round win over Anne-Gaelle Sidot.
SPORTS
November 6, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
The No. 77-ranked female tennis player in the world ordinarily doesn't receive much attention prior to touraments. Alexandra Stevenson, however, is not a normal No. 77. A year ago, Stevenson became the first female qualifier to reach the Wimbledon semifinals. During Wimbledon, it was revealed that her father is basketball great Julius Erving. As if these developments weren't enough, Alexandra's mother, Samantha Stevenson, leveled charges of racism on the women's tour.
SPORTS
July 1, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The off-the-court soap opera at Wimbledon continued yesterday, but the maelstrom that began Thursday died down slightly, giving way to the action on the court. Anne-Gaelle Sidot, a French player accused by Alexandra Stevenson of saying racial epithets, vehemently defended herself after losing to Tamarine Tanasugarn, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4, in a third-round match. Although Sidot admitted she pulled Stevenson's mother's hat during an argument, she said she did so in retaliation. Samantha Stevenson, Alexandra's mother, "had insulted Anne-Gaelle just a little while beforehand," a Women's Tennis Association interpreter said after Sidot relayed her answer in French.
SPORTS
June 30, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The WTA needs a PTA. Only four days into the most prestigious tennis tournament in the world, the Women's Tennis Association scrambled mightily yesterday, because the outspoken parents of two players overshadowed a wonderful day of tennis, including a late match between No. 2 seed Andre Agassi and unseeded Todd Martin. Following Jelena Dokic's second-round singles victory, her father, Damir, was escorted to the All England Club's security office after accusing the WTA of being fascist and then smashing a local television reporter's telephone.
SPORTS
July 23, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The Sporting News has reinforced what New Yorkers have been telling everybody for years - they live in the best sports town in the United States. New York was given the honor in the magazine's July 26 issue, beating out Dallas-Fort Worth, Denver, Atlanta and Philadelphia. New York was selected based on the strong showing of its professional sports teams. Among the highlights were the Yankees' World Series championship and an appearance by the NFL Jets in the AFC Championship.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | By Debbie Woodell
Lesbian athletes are in the news again - without doing anything and without even knowing they are newsworthy. And when those lesbians have no faces and no names, you know the news cannot be good. First, lesbians were shamefully used as props by another in a long line of overprotective tennis parents. This time, it was Samantha Stevenson, mother of teen-age phenom Alexandra, who made history this month as the first qualifier in history to reach the Wimbledon semifinals. As Alexandra's profile rose throughout the fortnight, Samantha sank to old familiar levels, saying she was worried that lesbians might prey on her daughter in the locker room.
LIVING
July 18, 1999 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can't help but wonder about an offhand comment made by Samantha Stevenson two decades ago. She was a sportswriter trying to gain access to the Phillies locker room in 1978, in the days when women were knocking on the door of equality. They wanted access to the athletes whom only male reporters had covered for generations. What was the team's objection? "I think [then-owner] Ruly Carpenter is fighting me so hard because he thinks I'll seduce his superstars, and find out what's really going on with that team and then write the whole damn thing in some national magazine," Stevenson told The Inquirer in October 1978.
SPORTS
July 4, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One week ago there were thousands of petunias, a few dozen challengers, and several tennis courts between Alexandra Stevenson and Wimbledon's Centre Court. Yesterday her mother sat in the great court's family box with Nike chairman Phil Knight and a representative of IMG, the sports-marketing giant. The 18-year-old Californian, in becoming the first qualifier to reach the semifinals here, had moved from obscurity to a tabloid-tainted fame. Stevenson's remarkable journey, as much a nightmare as a miracle, ended emphatically yesterday when third-ranked Lindsay Davenport thrashed her, 6-1, 6-1, in 47 minutes.
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