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NEWS
March 1, 2012
James F. McErlain Jr., 89, of Rydal, a retired sales executive, died Saturday, Feb. 25, of complications of Parkinson's disease at Holy Redeemer Hospital. Mr. McErlain graduated from Northeast High School in 1941. During World War II, he served in the Army as a military policeman at Fort Lewis, Wash. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree from Temple University in 1951. While at Temple, he was a salesman for Stuart F. Louchheim Co., an appliance firm in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Gallagher, 81, of Rhawnhurst, a retired Philadelphia Parking Authority manager who cofounded a youth football program, died of heart failure Friday at St. John Neumann Nursing Home in Northeast Philadelphia. Mr. Gallagher and his brother, Jerry, coached Olney Eagles Boys Club football teams in the 1960s. The players were 9 and older. "Jack noticed there were all these younger kids hanging around," his brother said, and in 1972 Mr. Gallagher and a group of men founded the Little Guys Football Conference for boys ages 6 to 8. The conference started with eight teams and 200 players.
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A viewing for legendary baseball player James B. "Mickey" Vernon will be from 2 to 7 p.m. today and 2 to 4 p.m. tomorrow at Nolan-Fidale Funeral Home, 5980 Chichester Ave., Aston. A life celebration will be scheduled for a later date. Mr. Vernon, 90, of Media, died of a stroke Wednesday at Riddle Memorial Hospital. For 20 seasons, Mr. Vernon played in the major leagues with the Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates.
NEWS
January 1, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesse Branson, 95, of South Philadelphia, a retired State Store employee and baseball authority who was featured in a Phillies video about the 2008 World Series, died last Friday at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Branson grew up playing sandlot baseball, and "he was a good player," said his sister, Georgette Fields. "If a ball went into the outfield, the other players knew he would catch it. " Her brother followed Negro League teams and worked as a water boy or ball boy to get a chance to go to games, she said.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles S. Kress, 92, a native Philadelphian who went on to play major league baseball, died Tuesday, March 4, of heart failure at a nursing home in Colville, Wash. Mr. Kress made his debut on April 16, 1947, with the Cincinnati Reds. His final game was played in July 1954 with the Brooklyn Dodgers. He told his family he was thrilled to be "batting in Yankee Stadium at the same plate as baseball greats Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. " Mr. Kress graduated from Frankford High with honors.
SPORTS
October 6, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
You might want to delay that next bite of bagel while we briefly discuss the historical and unsanitary marriage of baseball and saliva. Ballplayers, as you've undoubtedly witnessed, have serious oral fixations. Inside their mouths you're likely to find gum, sunflower seeds, smokeless tobacco, chewing tobacco, or some combination. While such habits have no calculable baseball benefit, they do have a tangible byproduct - spit. Given the Ebola panic, the sport's foul custom suddenly seems relevant.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
It's only my opinion, but . . . When I'm on a highway I get nervous driving near cars that have severe body damage. I'd pay big money to anybody who could help me keep up with paperwork. If you want to feel humble, take a stroll through a national park. Most security guards look as if they'd run if real trouble came. The same people who complained about the cold last winter are now complaining about the heat. I never understood how a man could hit a woman, but it's apparently a lot more common than we realized.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's April. It's baseball season. It's as blissful as it's always been. But it's all different now. If you wandered onto some of the neighborhood ball fields in the city and suburbs last weekend and asked how the game is going, this is what parents had to say: Everybody seems to play now, all the time. But it's all organized - definite times and definite places, definite themes and definite teams. Nobody seems to play spontaneously anymore. After-school pickup games are few and far between.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | By Calvin Trillin
Just when I was beginning to think that I had no influence at all, the New York City Health Department announced that in 1987 there was a decrease in the number of people who named babies Jason. I have nothing against the name Jason or anyone who is already named Jason. No Jason owes me money. No Jason ever struck me out in sandlot baseball - although considering a recurring problem with the curve, that might have been only because there weren't any Jasons in the neighborhood. My role in this came from having written a column last November about a question I normally ask any child I meet for the first time: "Of all the kids in your class, who is the nastiest, meanest, awfulest kid?"
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles Aldworth remembers taking part in parades in Indian dress with fellow members of Uppowoc Tribe No. 47, Improved Order of Red Men. He also remembers when membership in the lodge numbered about 400. "We had a really big time in town when we celebrated our 100th anniversary in 1958," recalled Aldworth, a member of the lodge for 65 of his 88 years. Today Uppowoc Tribe's membership is down to 51. The Red Men don't participate in borough parades anymore. Aldworth said the last time members wore their Indian garb was "20 to 25 years ago. " Like similar fraternal organizations, the Red Men are not attracting hordes of new members.
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SPORTS
October 6, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
You might want to delay that next bite of bagel while we briefly discuss the historical and unsanitary marriage of baseball and saliva. Ballplayers, as you've undoubtedly witnessed, have serious oral fixations. Inside their mouths you're likely to find gum, sunflower seeds, smokeless tobacco, chewing tobacco, or some combination. While such habits have no calculable baseball benefit, they do have a tangible byproduct - spit. Given the Ebola panic, the sport's foul custom suddenly seems relevant.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles S. Kress, 92, a native Philadelphian who went on to play major league baseball, died Tuesday, March 4, of heart failure at a nursing home in Colville, Wash. Mr. Kress made his debut on April 16, 1947, with the Cincinnati Reds. His final game was played in July 1954 with the Brooklyn Dodgers. He told his family he was thrilled to be "batting in Yankee Stadium at the same plate as baseball greats Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. " Mr. Kress graduated from Frankford High with honors.
NEWS
March 1, 2012
James F. McErlain Jr., 89, of Rydal, a retired sales executive, died Saturday, Feb. 25, of complications of Parkinson's disease at Holy Redeemer Hospital. Mr. McErlain graduated from Northeast High School in 1941. During World War II, he served in the Army as a military policeman at Fort Lewis, Wash. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree from Temple University in 1951. While at Temple, he was a salesman for Stuart F. Louchheim Co., an appliance firm in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 1, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jesse Branson, 95, of South Philadelphia, a retired State Store employee and baseball authority who was featured in a Phillies video about the 2008 World Series, died last Friday at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Branson grew up playing sandlot baseball, and "he was a good player," said his sister, Georgette Fields. "If a ball went into the outfield, the other players knew he would catch it. " Her brother followed Negro League teams and worked as a water boy or ball boy to get a chance to go to games, she said.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack Gallagher, 81, of Rhawnhurst, a retired Philadelphia Parking Authority manager who cofounded a youth football program, died of heart failure Friday at St. John Neumann Nursing Home in Northeast Philadelphia. Mr. Gallagher and his brother, Jerry, coached Olney Eagles Boys Club football teams in the 1960s. The players were 9 and older. "Jack noticed there were all these younger kids hanging around," his brother said, and in 1972 Mr. Gallagher and a group of men founded the Little Guys Football Conference for boys ages 6 to 8. The conference started with eight teams and 200 players.
NEWS
September 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A viewing for legendary baseball player James B. "Mickey" Vernon will be from 2 to 7 p.m. today and 2 to 4 p.m. tomorrow at Nolan-Fidale Funeral Home, 5980 Chichester Ave., Aston. A life celebration will be scheduled for a later date. Mr. Vernon, 90, of Media, died of a stroke Wednesday at Riddle Memorial Hospital. For 20 seasons, Mr. Vernon played in the major leagues with the Washington Senators, Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates.
NEWS
May 14, 2001 | By Paul Conlow
The Camden Riversharks opened their home season at their new ballpark Friday, and I'm rooting for them to restore some of the joy that professional baseball seems to have lost and to breathe new life into Camden's reputation as a baseball town. In 1939, the Federal Writers' Project produced a New Jersey guidebook that included this observation: "Camden is so interested in sandlot baseball that the city officially sponsors a league. " Memories of that league percolate out of the mind of 84-year-old Stanley Mojta.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Some dentists are quiet types. Not Earl S. Goldstein, who had a dental practice in Olney for 50 years - he was always telling jokes, always joking around. He was always smiling his crooked smile, and he loved to make people laugh. When his daughter was a teen-ager and had friends over, sometimes he'd come into the room with a clown nose and wig. "My friends loved him, but I was embarrassed to death," recalled Joan Schumer with a laugh. Goldstein, who died on Saturday at the age of 85, even met his wife joking around.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charles Aldworth remembers taking part in parades in Indian dress with fellow members of Uppowoc Tribe No. 47, Improved Order of Red Men. He also remembers when membership in the lodge numbered about 400. "We had a really big time in town when we celebrated our 100th anniversary in 1958," recalled Aldworth, a member of the lodge for 65 of his 88 years. Today Uppowoc Tribe's membership is down to 51. The Red Men don't participate in borough parades anymore. Aldworth said the last time members wore their Indian garb was "20 to 25 years ago. " Like similar fraternal organizations, the Red Men are not attracting hordes of new members.
NEWS
July 4, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
It's only my opinion, but . . . When I'm on a highway I get nervous driving near cars that have severe body damage. I'd pay big money to anybody who could help me keep up with paperwork. If you want to feel humble, take a stroll through a national park. Most security guards look as if they'd run if real trouble came. The same people who complained about the cold last winter are now complaining about the heat. I never understood how a man could hit a woman, but it's apparently a lot more common than we realized.
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