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NEWS
November 2, 2008 | By Calvin Hennick FOR THE INQUIRER
When I first heard about nude beaches as a young boy, I was intrigued. Not because I wanted to get naked myself - I wanted to see women's bodies, which were still a mystery to me. Taking off one's own clothes just seemed like the price of admission. Somehow, I made it into adulthood without so much as skinny-dipping. But a recent trip to Mexico's Caribbean coast for a friend's wedding gave me a good excuse to try it out. I picked the clothing-optional beach resort in Tulum chiefly because it was affordable - at 26, I no longer found nude women all that shocking.
NEWS
August 25, 2004 | By Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Dazzling. An incredible auditory and visual experience," said Pat Sutton, program director of the Cape May Bird Observatory. She was describing not a Broadway musical but the singing and dancing by thousands of shorebirds that have migrated from South and Central America to the beaches of Stone Harbor Point and other New Jersey coastal towns. They come for the fine seafood buffet and the habitat: a shelly, sandy beach that camouflages their eggs and young. Despite the friendly conditions, there are threats to the birds' survival.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
An endless drove of honking geese, arched against the blue-gray autumn sky like a maze of tiny little jets soaring across the heavens, told you that summer was now prologue. When the geese fly south over Cape May, N.J., winter is never far behind. It goes with the calendar. One season follows the other, as night the day. It is all part of the great mystique and majesty of nature. It was autumn now. The scorching suns of summer that brought happy throngs to the seaside had been tempered by nature.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a sandy beach in Ocean City last winter, Joe Manganello decided to end his nine-year run as a freeholder. Last week, he walked in to his surprise retirement roast to find a picture of himself on a table - a picture of that moment on the beach. "It was a beautiful winter day," he said of the day he had spent with his wife, Lucille. "One of the things we talked about was, I said, 'If I stay in politics and am campaigning, we're not going to have these moments. I enjoy my family much more.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | By Judi Dash, FOR THE INQUIRER
Unpacking my suitcase for a long weekend on this tiny coastal isle, I was struck by the thought that my schizoid smorgasbord of stuff couldn't possibly all be going on the same vacation. I pulled out a formal gown and mud-caked hiking boots, satin high heels and scruffy T-shirts, my pearl necklace and my Swiss army knife, perfume, bug spray, and hair spray, a rain suit, a bathing suit, and a windbreaker. But it was all standard gear for a stay at the Cloister, a deliciously eclectic retreat set on a lush swath of barrier island with a five-mile sandy beach, vast expanses of marshlands, and country lanes flanked by huge live oaks dripping with Spanish moss.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
As the lights signaled the intermission at Coastal Disturbances the other night, a woman in the audience fairly bellowed at her companion, "PEOPLE DON'T BEHAVE LIKE THAT!" After making the complaint, she collected herself, walked out of the Circle in the Square Theater uptown and did not come back. Hardly anybody followed her lead. Tina Howe's new play about a beach romance is riding a wave of critical approval that has washed it up on 50th Street from Off-Broadway's Second Stage, a company that got the same playwright's Painting Churches into circulation.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
When a storm like Saturday's hits Cape May City with high winds and a inch of rain, Beach Drive often is submerged by ocean waves that wash over a sea wall of boulders and flow across the pavement and down the street past the old Victorian-style homes, motels and shops. "In a major storm, it can look like Niagara Falls," said city engineer Alvin Herman. Afterward, poor drainage causes the water to collect in pools along some streets in the northeast section of town, especially in the low-lying "Frog Hollow" section.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lorenzo Moody Sr. went off to war healthy and returned a broken man. His limbs felt weak. His mood was bad. He was tired all the time. The doctors told him it was leukemia. His chances of leading a normal life were dim. That was 10 years ago. Yesterday, Moody and more than two dozen other cancer survivors were on the sandy beach just off Morey's Pier in Wildwood, cheering on more than 100 swimmers from across the Eastern Seaboard who dove into the Atlantic to help raise money for patients like themselves.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carl and Margie McDaniel of Pennsauken picked the right time for a Jersey Shore vacation. With the heat wave in full tropical force last week, they packed up their three sweaty children and a niece, and headed for Cape May County. Five miles short of the beach, they stopped. And, happily, stayed right where they were. "This is so much nicer" than the Shore, said Carl McDaniel, digging his toes into the sandy beach bordering the lake at the Beachcomber Camping Resort here.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Beachfront horse racing, Italian-style, will have to wait. It appears that the American version of the Palio race, planned for this resort starting Friday, will not be held. Despite the support of dozens of lawmakers and Gov. Christie, who signed the measure allowing races on Oct. 11 and 13, the Atlantic City Alliance said logistics, as well as the safety of the horses, called for postponing the event. New dates have yet to be determined for next year. "We've been working on it for six months," Jeff Guaracino, chief strategist for the alliance, the nonprofit charged with marketing the resort, said Friday.
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NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Beachfront horse racing, Italian-style, will have to wait. It appears that the American version of the Palio race, planned for this resort starting Friday, will not be held. Despite the support of dozens of lawmakers and Gov. Christie, who signed the measure allowing races on Oct. 11 and 13, the Atlantic City Alliance said logistics, as well as the safety of the horses, called for postponing the event. New dates have yet to be determined for next year. "We've been working on it for six months," Jeff Guaracino, chief strategist for the alliance, the nonprofit charged with marketing the resort, said Friday.
NEWS
November 2, 2008 | By Calvin Hennick FOR THE INQUIRER
When I first heard about nude beaches as a young boy, I was intrigued. Not because I wanted to get naked myself - I wanted to see women's bodies, which were still a mystery to me. Taking off one's own clothes just seemed like the price of admission. Somehow, I made it into adulthood without so much as skinny-dipping. But a recent trip to Mexico's Caribbean coast for a friend's wedding gave me a good excuse to try it out. I picked the clothing-optional beach resort in Tulum chiefly because it was affordable - at 26, I no longer found nude women all that shocking.
NEWS
August 25, 2004 | By Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Dazzling. An incredible auditory and visual experience," said Pat Sutton, program director of the Cape May Bird Observatory. She was describing not a Broadway musical but the singing and dancing by thousands of shorebirds that have migrated from South and Central America to the beaches of Stone Harbor Point and other New Jersey coastal towns. They come for the fine seafood buffet and the habitat: a shelly, sandy beach that camouflages their eggs and young. Despite the friendly conditions, there are threats to the birds' survival.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lorenzo Moody Sr. went off to war healthy and returned a broken man. His limbs felt weak. His mood was bad. He was tired all the time. The doctors told him it was leukemia. His chances of leading a normal life were dim. That was 10 years ago. Yesterday, Moody and more than two dozen other cancer survivors were on the sandy beach just off Morey's Pier in Wildwood, cheering on more than 100 swimmers from across the Eastern Seaboard who dove into the Atlantic to help raise money for patients like themselves.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | By Judi Dash, FOR THE INQUIRER
Unpacking my suitcase for a long weekend on this tiny coastal isle, I was struck by the thought that my schizoid smorgasbord of stuff couldn't possibly all be going on the same vacation. I pulled out a formal gown and mud-caked hiking boots, satin high heels and scruffy T-shirts, my pearl necklace and my Swiss army knife, perfume, bug spray, and hair spray, a rain suit, a bathing suit, and a windbreaker. But it was all standard gear for a stay at the Cloister, a deliciously eclectic retreat set on a lush swath of barrier island with a five-mile sandy beach, vast expanses of marshlands, and country lanes flanked by huge live oaks dripping with Spanish moss.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a sandy beach in Ocean City last winter, Joe Manganello decided to end his nine-year run as a freeholder. Last week, he walked in to his surprise retirement roast to find a picture of himself on a table - a picture of that moment on the beach. "It was a beautiful winter day," he said of the day he had spent with his wife, Lucille. "One of the things we talked about was, I said, 'If I stay in politics and am campaigning, we're not going to have these moments. I enjoy my family much more.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carl and Margie McDaniel of Pennsauken picked the right time for a Jersey Shore vacation. With the heat wave in full tropical force last week, they packed up their three sweaty children and a niece, and headed for Cape May County. Five miles short of the beach, they stopped. And, happily, stayed right where they were. "This is so much nicer" than the Shore, said Carl McDaniel, digging his toes into the sandy beach bordering the lake at the Beachcomber Camping Resort here.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sea Isle City offers an unusually revealing view of Jim Murray's beach- front house these days - from the front and the back, from either side and from underneath. Revealing, yes, but not pretty. Not since what has come to be called the "Halloween Storm" tore the dunes right out from under the vacation home of the former general manager of the Philadelphia Eagles. The storm, which ripped away much of the Jersey Shore, had a particularly eerie effect on Murray's house.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
When a storm like Saturday's hits Cape May City with high winds and a inch of rain, Beach Drive often is submerged by ocean waves that wash over a sea wall of boulders and flow across the pavement and down the street past the old Victorian-style homes, motels and shops. "In a major storm, it can look like Niagara Falls," said city engineer Alvin Herman. Afterward, poor drainage causes the water to collect in pools along some streets in the northeast section of town, especially in the low-lying "Frog Hollow" section.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
An endless drove of honking geese, arched against the blue-gray autumn sky like a maze of tiny little jets soaring across the heavens, told you that summer was now prologue. When the geese fly south over Cape May, N.J., winter is never far behind. It goes with the calendar. One season follows the other, as night the day. It is all part of the great mystique and majesty of nature. It was autumn now. The scorching suns of summer that brought happy throngs to the seaside had been tempered by nature.
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