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Sanitation

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NEWS
August 16, 1997
In a critical but seldom discussed measure of civilization, the world remains more medieval than modern. The issue is basic sanitation - decent toilets or latrines. More than half the world's people lack access to this necessity, and their numbers have grown by 300 million since 1990. Behind the huge numbers in the 1997 Progress of Nations report, compiled by the United Nations Children Fund, is a tragic story of human suffering and death, resulting from short-sightedness that is both expensive and maddening - because it could have been prevented and can easily be cured.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
"For a long time the unsatisfactory condition of the streets has been a subject of complaint in Philadelphia, and the public expected vast improvement under municipal operation. Most certainly, public decency and convenience require that the streets should be kept reasonably clean, while consideration for the public health demands that at frequent intervals there should be thorough cleansing. " - The Bureau of Municipal Research, 1924 Street cleaning has been a sensitive political issue throughout much of Philadelphia's history, particularly for the neighborhoods.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Some city streets were awash in blood last night, and it was not even human. It was horse blood, according to the company that left the blood in its garbage, to be picked up by city sanitation crews. The spill began as the city sanitation truck on routine rounds at about 7:05 p.m. picked up a trash load on S. 24th Street in Center City and turned on its compactor, the crew told police. Blood began leaking and spurting out, police said. The trash contained hundreds of vials of blood, they added.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly after noon on Monday, Bill Lombardi climbed down from his white Deptford Township trash truck for the last time. He then waited around the public works offices for his final paycheck. Yesterday, he was to file for unemployment. Lombardi and 11 fellow sanitation workers are casualties of Deptford Township's decision to hire Gus Bittner, a private trash hauler, to collect the township's trash for the next five years. Township manager William Saunders said the private haulers would save Deptford taxpayers as much as $500,000 over the five years.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the man in charge of the city's sanitation, Carlton Williams has a thankless job. Despite being the innovator behind the Recyclebank rewards program and the BigBelly trash cans, his is the type of behind-the-scenes public service that usually gets noticed only when something goes wrong. That is why he was a little concerned when Mayor Nutter called him early Friday morning, while he was taking his children to school. "I said, 'Who missed their trash?' " Williams joked.
NEWS
November 5, 2007 | By Claudia Rosett
The United Nations has declared 2008 the International Year of Sanitation. What this portends was heralded last week by a four-day conference in New Delhi, awash in bureaucrats from about 40 countries and dubbed the "World Toilet Summit. " If that sounds like a joke, sanitation is no laughing matter. According to U.N. estimates, 2.6 billion people worldwide lack access to hygienic toilets. The U.N.'s aim is to halve this number by the year 2015, as part of a broader agenda of halving poverty.
NEWS
May 3, 1989
At a time when some top officials in the Goode administration are questioning the wisdom of hiring a platoon of inspectors to enforce the city's trash laws, the Pennsylvania Economy League (PEL) has come out with a study showing why such a move is so important. PEL compared sanitation enforcement in Philadelphia with seven major cities that have been making serious efforts to reduce litter. All relied heavily on enforcement - rather than intensive cleanup efforts - to keep their streets clean.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | By MATTHEW MILLER
Would Mother Teresa's funeral really have been splashed across the front page if media executives didn't want to atone for the ridiculous excess of Diana coverage? That's my theory, but if we're feeling guilty about priorities, there's a better way to make amends: Let's honor both these women's good works by eradicating an ailment that's needlessly killed 20 million children in the last decade. Unbelievably, this malady is diarrhea. And it could be wiped out with an investment of 1 percent of what the world spends on military weapons each year.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rendell administration is supposed to be changing work rules, job descriptions and schedules to increase efficiency. How has it affected city employees? Ask workers finishing a shift at the sanitation yard at 7th and Pattison, and they'll say they don't know what you're talking about. What they will say, with profanity in profusion, is that they're ticked off at the Rendell administration and the labor contract they were handed a year ago. None would give their names, but everyone gave it to their bosses.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert C. Shinn Jr. has a simple answer for what first led to his interest in the environment: "They gave me garbage. " Shinn, a Burlington County businessman poised to become New Jersey's environmental commissioner, was assigned to oversee Hainesport's sanitation department as a newly elected township councilman in 1968. Since then, he's become a solid-waste expert known statewide for pleasing both environmentalists and industry while serving as an Assemblyman, a Pinelands commissioner and county freeholder.
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NEWS
August 12, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
ASK A CITY trashman or woman what's the nastiest part of the job or the worst thing that's ever happened, and the answer is not easy. Because there's just so much, especially in the summer: The asphalt is hot enough to melt the soles of work boots. The stink can churn an iron stomach. The maggots are celebrating their new life. The bees treat you like a pin cushion. The open-air drug dealers stop you and say, "Hold up, don't dump that can. " And yes, it's summertime and indeed the livin' is easy - for raccoons, opossums, rats and mice.
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mamadou Sacko and Barry Williams spend their work days enveloped in a malodorous fog. If it is even mildly warm out, they are trailed by a light constellation of flies. During an eight-hour shift, they will pick up and dump 20 tons of refuse - from aging love seats to sacks of unrecognizable slop - the typical haul for a crew of Philadelphia sanitation workers, positions commonly known as trash collectors. "Best job I've ever had," both men will tell you. "I don't know, I just really enjoy it," said Sacko, 41, who prefers the work to the nine years he spent as an overnight manager of a gas station.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | BY JOHN CORRIGAN, For the Daily News
JENNY DRUMGOOLE throws surprise pizza parties for the city's trash workers as a thank you for their service. For tonight's party at Little Berlin art gallery in Kensington, it's no surprise - the trash collectors are taking over. And you're invited. While filming her impromptu curbside celebrations since last May for her documentary "How-To Happy Trash Day" - which premieres as part of tonight's "The Place of Dead Roads" exhibit - Drumgoole learned that the sanitation workers have been working without a contract for five years.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | BY ANGELO FICHERA, Daily News Staff Writer fichera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5913
The same social media that Green Eggs Café has used to regularly promote its breakfast offerings has come back to bite it — like a rat. The restaurant's Midtown Village location, at 13th and Locust streets, fell under public scrutiny beginning last night, when passersby spotted a number of rats on a table. A crowd gathered around the closed establishment about 10 p.m., taking photos of the rodents surrounding two pizza boxes on a table. Jenna Bachen, who lives nearby, said she was walking home when she saw the rats — at least four — on the table and the floor.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David J. Damiano Sr., 79, of Garnet Valley, a former Philadelphia streets commissioner and longtime sanitation engineer, died Monday, Feb. 18, at home of complications from the flu. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Mr. Damiano was a 1955 undergraduate of Villanova University. He earned a master's degree in civil engineering from the school in 1963. He was a longtime Philadelphia employee, starting in 1955 as a graduate engineer and working his way up to chief engineer of sanitation.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four exotic animals have died since September at a Burlington County zoo under federal investigation for animal-welfare violations. A female giraffe that survived a roaring barn fire in 2011 was euthanized in December, three days before a hyena cub was hit by a car. An adult hyena with a foot wound was euthanized in October and an ailing lemur was found dead in its cage in September, in both cases after the animals' care was neglected, according to...
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes
Every Tuesday Leah Howse got a 4:30 a.m. wake-up call. Free of charge, courtesy of the trash haulers right outside her bedroom. Since December, when someone moved a Dumpster to the alley behind her house, the noisy haulers consistently provided an unwanted alarm. Howse, who lives in Francisville, says the combination of the beeping truck, the banging to make sure the Dumpster's empty, and the workers yelling to each other ensures that her day starts early. "It's relatively quick," she says, "but then I'm awake.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
It was one of the most graphic details in a grand jury report filled with uncomfortable passages: A sentence on Page 37 stating that after the Rev. James J. Brennan anally raped a 14-year-old, the priest remained inside his body as the boy cried himself to sleep. Yet in Monday's opening statements at the long-awaited clergy sex-abuse trial in Common Pleas Court, both the prosecution and a defense attorney offered a sharply sanitized version of that night, which casts doubt on the case against Brennan and could weaken the conspiracy charge against Msgr.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the man in charge of the city's sanitation, Carlton Williams has a thankless job. Despite being the innovator behind the Recyclebank rewards program and the BigBelly trash cans, his is the type of behind-the-scenes public service that usually gets noticed only when something goes wrong. That is why he was a little concerned when Mayor Nutter called him early Friday morning, while he was taking his children to school. "I said, 'Who missed their trash?' " Williams joked.
NEWS
October 13, 2011
SHIVAANI Selvaraj, 38, is a founder of Philadelphia's Media Mobilizing Project and producer on Tavis Smiley's "The Poverty Tour: A Call to Conscience," a five-part documentary series about poverty across the U.S. airing this week on PBS. Q: How did MMP's participation in "The Poverty Tour" come to be? A: We were invited on the tour because, basically, we exist to build a movement in the U.S. We believe we need to wage a new war on the poverty across color lines in this country.
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