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NEWS
May 4, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Thousands of engineers, conductors and other employees of the Atchison- Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co. walked off their jobs yesterday in a dispute over the use of nonunion workers. The strike shut down three Amtrak passenger lines. Members of the United Transportation Union and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers went on strike at about 9:30 a.m. Central time throughout Santa Fe's 12,000-mile railroad network in 13 states, officials said. "We're going to continue to run trains with supervisory personnel," said Richard Hall, a Santa Fe spokesman in Chicago.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S BEEN EIGHT YEARS since Gene Hackman last appeared in a movie - 2004's "Welcome to Mooseport. " Since then, except for writing, he's been out of the public eye. But Hackman popped up in the news Wednesday when Santa Fe, N.M., police said the retired actor unretired and acted in self-defense, slapping a homeless man who had become aggressive toward Hackman and his wife. The Hackmans have a home in Santa Fe. The incident occurred Tuesday afternoon in downtown Santa Fe, where there are a lot of homeless people, a lot of jewelry for sale and awesome fajitas.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drew Lewis, chief executive of Union Pacific Corp., said here yesterday that his transportation company's proposed merger with Santa Fe Pacific Corp. would make more money for shareholders than a competing offer while costing shippers less. "I'm in this because it is the right thing for us to do. I'm going to hang in," Lewis told the Penjerdel Council, a tri-state business and industry group meeting at the Union League. "We'll offer the best service and move product at lower cost," said Lewis, whose company is based in Bethlehem, Pa. Union Pacific offered $3.4 billion to Santa Fe on Oct. 5, compared with Burlington Northern Inc.'s previously announced stock bid, then valued at $2.5 billion.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Santa Fe Pacific Corp., its friendly merger with Burlington Northern Inc. apparently derailed, yesterday began merger talks with Union Pacific Corp., of Bethlehem, Pa. Robert Krebs, Santa Fe's chief executive, talked by phone with Dick Davidson, chief executive of Union Pacific's rail unit, for the first time since Union Pacific launched the hostile takeover fight, Union Pacific sources said. A Santa Fe announcement confirmed that the company was now willing to meet with Union Pacific.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1994 | By Susan Hightower, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Tom Belden contributed to this article
Burlington Northern Inc. and Santa Fe Pacific Corp. said yesterday that they had agreed to a merger intended to create the nation's largest rail network, giving themselves reach from Canada to Mexico. The proposed $2.7 billion stock swap must be approved by the Interstate Commerce Commission and by shareholders of both companies. The union would forge a network with 33,000 miles of track in the Midwest, West and Southeast. Burlington Northern chairman Gerald Grinstein and Robert Krebs, chairman of Santa Fe, said the North American Free Trade Agreement helped prompt the agreement.
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012
15 Santuario Dr., Chimayo, N.M. It's eight miles east of Espanola, about 30 miles north of Santa Fe, and 40 miles south of Taos. www.elsantuariodechimayo.us/ Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m., October-April and 9 a.m.-6 p.m., May-September.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
IF YOU GO GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL PARK AND PRESERVE: Located near Mosca, Colo., about 240 miles southwest of Denver and 185 miles north of Santa Fe, N.M. The park is open daily year-round, although the visitors center closes at night and on holidays. Admission is $3 for ages 16 and older. Under 16 free. Info, www.nps.gov/ grsa.
NEWS
July 22, 2012
Readers of Travel + Leisure apparently haven't been to Philadelphia. The magazine's 2012 World's Best Awards readers' poll rated the Top 10 Cities in the United States and Canada, based on sights, culture/arts, restaurants/food, people, shopping, and value. Read more at travelandleisure.com. 10. Honolulu 9. Quebec City 8. Savannah, Ga. 7. Vancouver, B.C. 6. Santa Fe, N.M. 5. New Orleans 4. Charleston, S.C. 3. San Francisco 2. Chicago 1. New York City
REAL_ESTATE
June 5, 1994 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Santa Fe, Burlington Township, Burlington County Jeff and Melissa Trent, both computer programmers in their 20s, took the road to home ownership and ended up in Santa Fe. "We moved to get out of the apartment. We were kind of cramped . . . and we were tired of paying in excess of $900 per month in rent," said Jeff Trent, who bought in K. Hovnanian Cos.' single-family-home community, Santa Fe. "We wanted to build equity. So we moved partly for the investment and partly to get into a single home.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2013 | By E. Graham Robb, For The Inquirer
Early on a chilly morning, my 25-year-old son and I could detect the odor of burning garbage as we walked down a dirt road in a poverty-stricken section of Santa Fe, Argentina, bordered by ditches full of stagnant water. Ahead of us lay a day of construction work with a group of volunteers and local families, most of whom we had met only a few days earlier. We could not have been happier. Such is the experience you can expect on a Habitat for Humanity Global Village trip. I was the team leader for our group of 14 during a week in which we worked hand-in-hand with three "partner" families to repair and expand their homes.
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TRAVEL
March 11, 2013 | By E. Graham Robb, For The Inquirer
Early on a chilly morning, my 25-year-old son and I could detect the odor of burning garbage as we walked down a dirt road in a poverty-stricken section of Santa Fe, Argentina, bordered by ditches full of stagnant water. Ahead of us lay a day of construction work with a group of volunteers and local families, most of whom we had met only a few days earlier. We could not have been happier. Such is the experience you can expect on a Habitat for Humanity Global Village trip. I was the team leader for our group of 14 during a week in which we worked hand-in-hand with three "partner" families to repair and expand their homes.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S BEEN EIGHT YEARS since Gene Hackman last appeared in a movie - 2004's "Welcome to Mooseport. " Since then, except for writing, he's been out of the public eye. But Hackman popped up in the news Wednesday when Santa Fe, N.M., police said the retired actor unretired and acted in self-defense, slapping a homeless man who had become aggressive toward Hackman and his wife. The Hackmans have a home in Santa Fe. The incident occurred Tuesday afternoon in downtown Santa Fe, where there are a lot of homeless people, a lot of jewelry for sale and awesome fajitas.
NEWS
July 22, 2012
Readers of Travel + Leisure apparently haven't been to Philadelphia. The magazine's 2012 World's Best Awards readers' poll rated the Top 10 Cities in the United States and Canada, based on sights, culture/arts, restaurants/food, people, shopping, and value. Read more at travelandleisure.com. 10. Honolulu 9. Quebec City 8. Savannah, Ga. 7. Vancouver, B.C. 6. Santa Fe, N.M. 5. New Orleans 4. Charleston, S.C. 3. San Francisco 2. Chicago 1. New York City
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012
15 Santuario Dr., Chimayo, N.M. It's eight miles east of Espanola, about 30 miles north of Santa Fe, and 40 miles south of Taos. www.elsantuariodechimayo.us/ Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m., October-April and 9 a.m.-6 p.m., May-September.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By David Porter, Associated Press
TEANECK, N.J. - A New Jersey physics professor who dabbled in scuba diving and harbored dreams of working in the theater had another hobby, New Mexico police say: operating a sophisticated prostitution website that may have catered to as many as 200 prostitutes and 1,200 clients. David Flory, 68, was arrested Sunday at a Starbucks in Albuquerque on 40 counts of promoting prostitution. The professor, who has taught at Fairleigh Dickinson University since 1969, has a vacation home in Santa Fe. A specialist in elementary particle theory, Flory also spent a decade in the school's administration, where he said he spent time working on human-resources database systems and measuring academic productivity - skills that were evident from the three-tiered system police say he created for rating the privileges of johns who used the prostitution service.
TRAVEL
March 27, 2011
Here are travel bargains around the globe, by land, sea, and air. Deals sell out quickly and are not guaranteed to be available. Restrictions such as day of travel, blackout dates, and advance-purchase requirements may apply. Land The Eldorado Hotel in Santa Fe, N.M., is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a 25 percent off sale for April stays. Rooms that normally start at $229 per night double are going for $169. Add about $25 a night in taxes. The pueblo-style hotel, adjacent to historic Santa Fe Plaza, has a spa and a rooftop pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
IF YOU GO GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL PARK AND PRESERVE: Located near Mosca, Colo., about 240 miles southwest of Denver and 185 miles north of Santa Fe, N.M. The park is open daily year-round, although the visitors center closes at night and on holidays. Admission is $3 for ages 16 and older. Under 16 free. Info, www.nps.gov/ grsa.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opera audiences here seem to converge from different decades, whether they're dowagers unchanged since the 1950s, sun-baked disco bunnies from the 1980s, or the tattooed-and-pierced 21st-century set. How well the Santa Fe Opera serves this patchwork constituency is an annual source of curiosity that draws artistic directors from Philadelphia to Seattle. And that's why any given season here is an operatic crystal ball for much of the rest of the country. This year, the diva worshipers won the durable, oft-venerated mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter in the title role of Carmen (through Aug. 26)
REAL_ESTATE
August 17, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Several months of rain have left us with a surplus of water. Drought restrictions are not on our plate this year. The grass is green even in midsummer, and perennials and annuals (and weeds) loom large in our backyards. But nature is fickle and given to extremes. This is especially true in the West and Southwest, where development has strained limited water supplies, drought-aggravated wildfires have burned thousands of acres, and states such as California, Nevada and Arizona have battled regularly over Colorado River water quotas.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Its name is Spanish for "Saint Faith," and for 70 years the dominant faiths of Rancho Santa Fe, an exclusive enclave fragrant of eucalyptus, old money and new mansions, have been golf and tennis. Bing Crosby established his celebrated Pro/Am golf tournament in this sunny but temperate California spot in 1937, before the clambake grew too big and relocated to Pebble Beach. But the village where 39 people died in a mass suicide is still home to Rancho Valencia, rated the nation's ace tennis resort.
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