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Satellite Campus

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NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Shaun Stanert, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Bucks County Community College officials have delayed plans to build a $5 million satellite campus in Bristol Borough on land donated by the Grundy Foundation. BCCC's interim president, Charles Rollins, announced last Thursday that proposed state funding cuts aimed at public and private colleges would hamper BCCC's efforts to take advantage of the Grundy Foundation's $700,000 land gift. Rollins explained, after a closed board of trustees meeting, that BCCC did not have the money to begin building the campus in time to meet the foundation's June 1993 deadline.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Beginning in January, students in the lower part of Bucks County won't have to head north to earn a college degree. Bucks County Community College will start offering associate degrees in liberal arts and business administration at its satellite campus in Bristol Township, said David J. Johnson, associate dean for evening and off-campus programs. The Bristol campus now offers mostly introductory courses. In order to take the more advanced courses required for an associate degree, students must commute to the main campus on Swamp Road in Newtown Township.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Camden County College has received the last $1 million it needs to pay for a new satellite campus in Cherry Hill. The $1 million gift, donated by the William G. Rohrer Charitable Foundation, is the largest in the college's 29-year history. Previously, the largest gift was $30,000, for scholarships. "What is most special about this gift is its local nature," said College President Phyllis Della Vecchia. "Because of the gift, the college will reach more Camden County citizens, employers and workers.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The school district will lose $125,000 in annual revenue when Burlington Community College closes its satellite campus at the Memorial School on Riverton Road. "Anytime you lose $125,000, it's tough and you don't want to do it but we're trying to recoup that. If we can't, we're going to have to make adjustments," said School Superintendent Timothy Wade. For the last 15 years, BCC has paid the rent and the utility bills for the old elementary school. Now, its growing student body warrants a move to a larger, more modern facility in Mount Laurel.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Bucks County Community College will undergo a large expansion and restoration over the next three years that will give the Newtown school permanent campuses in Bristol Borough and Upper Bucks County for the first time. President William Vincent said the school was preparing to sell as much as $18 million in bonds to build the two satellite sites and to renovate and expand classrooms on the Newtown campus. Last week, the county commissioners smoothed the way for the college's bond issue by formally extending the college's financing for 30 more years.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Shaun Stanert, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Bucks County Community College officials have announced that the terms of a $700,000 land gift, earmarked for a satellite campus, are still negotiable. The college had been expected to begin construction on the campus by 1993, a deadline it said had been imposed by the Grundy Foundation, which donated the land. At the college's board meeting last week, however, Chairman Blake Eisenhart said that BCCC officials recently had met with Grundy officials to explain that a lack of funds had forced the college to delay plans for the satellite campus, on Beaver Street in Bristol Borough.
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County Community College satellite campus could become a centerpiece in a proposed Lower Bucks enterprise zone. The college is considering sites within the proposed 16-square-mile zone in search of a more permanent location for its Lower Bucks extension campus, now in Bristol Township. College officials discussed the idea during a meeting Friday with members of the county's enterprise-zone task force. While a move could be years away, the zone contains several "delightful and very interesting prospects," said college president James Linksz.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before the recession put a stranglehold on the economy at the end of 1990, Bucks County Community College officials had visions of a $5 million satellite campus in Bristol Borough. They even had a $700,000 gift of property from the Grundy Foundation to start with. Now they have neither. Saddled with a $1 million budget deficit, the college administration has reluctantly decided to return the land deed to the nonprofit charitable group, said Lisa Schmidt, college spokeswoman.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cheerleaders literally flipped over plans for the borough's rebirth last night. Their shouts had barely faded from the Borough Hall's council chambers when Mayor Ted LeBlanc introduced the major player. He was Wayne developer Brian O'Neill, who laid out his vision for a resurgent downtown Norristown, replete with sports, entertainment, a satellite campus and commercial office space. "We are motivated, can-do, get-it-done kind of people," O'Neill said. "We are very interested in being the developers for downtown Norristown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rowan University president Ali A. Houshmand says 2012 "really wasn't easy," an uncharacteristic understatement by a man whose speaking style tends toward emphatic. If not dramatic. "Never in my wildest dreams did I think we could pull it off," he says, referring to the July debut of the new Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, in downtown Camden. "A huge one" is how Houshmand describes the impact of Rowan's recent acquisition of the UMDNJ-School of Osteopathic Medicine campus in Stratford.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pushing back against Gov. Christie's proposal to merge Rutgers-Camden into Rowan University, the president of the Rutgers University system told a state legislative panel Monday that it was unlikely his university's governing boards would "willingly relinquish the campus. " "Given our choice at Rutgers, if we could pick and choose among the recommendations . . . we would not want to turn over the Rutgers-Camden campus to Rowan University," Richard L. McCormick told the Senate Higher Education Committee during a hearing in Trenton.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
If any building could be said to "loom," it's the Camden County jail. This six-story, blockwide pile of beige bricks at Third and Federal Streets dominates the landscape of downtown Camden and the waterfront. Even without those ladies on the sidewalks body-texting their incarcerated loved ones, the jail is one famous joint. And not in a good way. In 2009 it looked as though the jail might disappear like the state's now-vanished Riverfront Prison, a dozen blocks north.
NEWS
April 7, 2009
Drexel University President Constantine Papadakis always seemed like a big man in a big hurry. Indeed, the gregarious Papadakis, who died at the much-too-young age of 63 on Sunday night, packed a lifetime of major accomplishments into his frenetic 13-year tenure at Drexel. From the moment Papadakis stepped onto the West Philadelphia campus, he shook up the sleepy engineering school that had been losing money and students. In his first week on the job in August 1995, Papadakis was stunned to learn that the staff took off on Fridays in the summer.
NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Northwood Academy Charter School is Brien N. Gardiner's other charter school. Since the scandal erupted at Philadelphia Academy Charter School in April, Northwood has been trying to extricate itself from Gardiner, his associates, and the business entities he created. Nonetheless, Northwood, an elementary school with 775 students at two sites, has been drawn into the widening federal criminal investigation of Gardiner and other former top administrators at Philadelphia Academy.
NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Northwood Academy Charter School is Brien N. Gardiner's other charter school. Since the scandal erupted at Philadelphia Academy Charter School in April, Northwood has been trying to extricate itself from Gardiner, his associates, and the business entities he created. Nonetheless, Northwood, an elementary school with 775 students at two sites, has been drawn into the widening federal criminal investigation of Gardiner and other former top administrators at Philadelphia Academy.
NEWS
April 27, 2005 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Several universities with South Jersey campuses said yesterday that they had begun complying with a State Commission of Investigation probe into the awarding of contracts. Rutgers University, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and Rowan University all confirmed that they had been asked for financial information. A letter also went to the New Jersey Institute of Technology, according to the Bergen County Record newspaper. The letters ask for records of charitable donations; contracts between schools and professionals; payments for services of those professionals, including consultants; and grants awarded.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After two years of talks, Burlington County College has committed to becoming part of Willingboro's planned Town Center. The college's satellite campus is the third known tenant in the multimillion-dollar project, which is considered key to the county's efforts to revitalize the depressed Route 130 corridor. The center will be anchored by a Merck-Medco automated mail-service pharmacy and a $6.1 million township library. "We're very excited," Mayor Jeffrey Ramsey said. "Since this whole concept of the Town Center was initiated, we've been talking about having the college in the Town Center.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cheerleaders literally flipped over plans for the borough's rebirth last night. Their shouts had barely faded from the Borough Hall's council chambers when Mayor Ted LeBlanc introduced the major player. He was Wayne developer Brian O'Neill, who laid out his vision for a resurgent downtown Norristown, replete with sports, entertainment, a satellite campus and commercial office space. "We are motivated, can-do, get-it-done kind of people," O'Neill said. "We are very interested in being the developers for downtown Norristown.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until 1970, when Gloucester County College's first buildings were constructed on its Sewell campus, administrators worked out of two structures: a farmhouse and a barn. Thirty years later, the college has come a long way from the time when decisions about its future were made under a hayloft, and not just because it has better facilities. This year, the college added an associate degree in electronic commerce. It also has strengthened its ties to area businesses by expanding the satellite campus in Logan, where businesses come for high-tech training.
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