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NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Pauline Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
In attempting to explain what Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SATs) really mean, William Elliott, a trustee of the College Entrance Examination Board, told a Great Valley audience more about what they don't mean. Elliott, vice president for enrollment at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, vowed at the start to present his personal view of college entrance requirements. He ranked SATs as fourth in importance of seven criteria considered in the admissions process by most small selective colleges.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
To my knowledge, How I Got Into College marks Hollywood's first attempt at SATire. It is a broadly drawn comedy about the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SATs) for all those benighted souls who remember staring blankly at multiple choices about when two trains traveling at different speeds will pass each other. And, let's face it, that's a lot of us - not to mention all those high school seniors who still have to live in annual dread of SATs. How I Got Into College is directed by Savage Steve Holland without the savagery this wholesale national sorting method invites.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
It was refreshing to see the News take a conservative position defending SAT scores for college admissions (editorial, Feb. 23). Although it is not said, those who want to do away with SATs are motivated by the fact that minority students do far worse on these tests than white and Asian students, and are thus denied admission to the better colleges. In reality, the SATs do these people a service in weeding them out before they take up spots that should go to more qualified students, only to fail miserably.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Dodge Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
When high school seniors rip open college decision letters, it's perhaps unavoidable that they feel for an instant as if brushed by the wings of death. Most will have had a similar feeling, maybe several times, when they open letters announcing scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Are SATs all that important? Should families get so worked up about a test whose validity has been under fire and which some well-known colleges no longer require? The answer isn't simple.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
WHEN I entered Temple in September of 1956, I was not required to take what was then called the College Boards because I finished in the upper 25 percent of my class at South Philadelphia High School. Temple required only that I take placements tests for English and math. Forgive me, then, if I'm puzzled by Dom Giordano's concerns that Temple's decision to forego the SATs is going to dilute the quality of its student body. I agree with Giordano that an "A" at a suburban high school may be worth more than an "A" at an inner-city school, and that is also the problem.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
I ALWAYS felt like a little bit of an imposter in college. It wasn't that I was straight and a significant percentage of the Bryn Mawr population loved both Virginia Woolf and Emily Dickinson. (Take whatever inference you want from that . . . ) It wasn't that I was pro-life and most of my sister students were busy protecting their ovaries from my rosaries. It wasn't that I loved football, and the only Eagles they were interested in were the ones on the endangered-species list.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A women's think tank said yesterday that women score lower than men on the Scholastic Aptitude Text largely because some questions are biased in favor of men. A two-year study done for the Center for Women's Policy Studies found 12 to 16 percent of SAT questions were sexually biased - nearly all against women - because they were posed in contexts more familiar to men, such as sports, war and, in one case, "a boys' camp. " The SAT, taken by high school students planning to attend college, has been widely criticized for racial bias and for failing to accurately predict a student's college performance.
NEWS
March 9, 2006 | By Jeff Price INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a highly nervous time of year for college applicants, all students need is another reason to raise anxiety levels. So it will be good for 2006-07 freshmen to hear, based on a sampling yesterday of area universities, that errors in SAT scores acknowledged by the College Board won't have a significant impact on admissions. The board, which administers the SATs, said yesterday on its Web site that it "recently discovered a technical processing matter" and that about 4,000 of 495,000 test-takers "did not receive credit for some correct answers.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paige Ramsey weighed in with the combined Scholastic Aptitude Test score of about 950. Right away she could have forgotten the University of Pennsylvania, unless she was already halfway to finding a cure for cancer. Penn's incoming freshman class next month will boast median SAT scores of 1275 (1600 is perfection). That score also would have put Paige on a "real suspicious list" had she applied to Drexel University, says Drexel's dean of admissions. Drexel likes to see at a score of at least 1000.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | BY CHUCK STONE
Do you have the intelligence of a second-grader or an 11th-grader? To find out, you can answer the following test question: Which of the following statements about standardized tests such as the SAT is true. a. They really don't measure how intelligent you are. b. High school grade point averages are more accurate than SATs in predicting how well students will do as college freshmen. c. Women generally have higher grade point averages than men, but perform more poorly on SATs.
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SPORTS
August 5, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
DeMarco Murray practiced without issue on Monday, which would not be so noteworthy if he had done the same on Sunday. But Murray did not participate in team drills on the first day of Eagles training camp, and the prized free-agent signing did not have an explanation for his conspicuous absence. Murray, the defending NFL rushing champion with the Dallas Cowboys, said that his lack of participation was a coach's decision. He added that he was not injured. "You're always upset when you don't get the chance to go out there and compete and take the pressure off the other guys," Murray said.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2010, John Erlenbach walked away from a job at Acme Markets, where he had worked in every area from produce to shelf stocking for 20 years since leaving the Navy. "I wasn't well," Erlenbach, 61, said. He struggled with depression, couldn't hold a job or keep an apartment, grew apart from his five kids, and was homeless for years - sleeping on couches, the street, or in shelters in Salem and Camden Counties. On Wednesday, Erlenbach stood in front of his one-bedroom townhouse at Riverfront Village in Pennsauken, a 75-unit affordable-housing complex for working families earning less than 60 percent of the area's median household income, as well as five previously homeless veterans.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Alexa Middleton finished taking the SAT on June 6, she flopped onto her parents' bed: "I'm done. I did it. " She would tell her mother later, "I don't want to take that test ever again. " But the 17-year-old rising senior at Abington Friends School in Jenkintown would get an awful surprise a few days later. Because of a printing error, the College Board, which owns the SAT, announced that it would not score two sections of the test - one in reading, one in math - given to 487,000 students in the United States on that Saturday.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CONTROVERSIAL parcel of land for which the Nutter administration wants to pay more than $7.2 million was once the site of a scrap-metal firm that dismantled a ship exposed to atomic-bomb tests in the Marshall Islands after World War II, the Daily News has learned. The USS Niagara, a wartime naval-transport ship, in July 1946 became a "target ship" in Operation Crossroads, in which the U.S. conducted atomic-bomb tests "using nuclear devices very similar to the one dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945," according to a document obtained from the U.S. Defense Department's Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
COULD "JURASSIC World" become a reality some day? According to Jack Horner - the world's most renowned paleontologist and a consultant on "Jurassic World" - the answer is yes. "I think one day in the not too distant future, we're going to have the ability to create any animal we want," Horner said. "That includes dinosaurs and even - though it may sound silly - unicorns. " Although Sam Neill's original "Jurassic Park" paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant was based on Horner, he feels it is more of an honor and more important that Steven Spielberg chose him to give the film some scientific plausibility, rather than take the easy way out and do a movie that was science fantasy.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AFTER SHE WAS tased, covered with a hood, abducted and thrown into a burgundy van in a Center City parking garage, a Jewelers Row employee was beaten during a torturous 2 1/2-hour ride in which one of her three attackers sat on her, federal authorities said yesterday. A "very heavy" man sat on the 53-year-old employee of National Watch and Diamond Exchange, said Special Agent Sarah O'Reilly of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, who interviewed the victim. "Most of the time, when he was not beating on her, he was sitting on her," as the woman screamed from the pain of the beatings and from his heft, O'Reilly said.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cabrini College will join a growing number of schools that have made standardized test scores optional for admission, and at the same time will freeze the cost of going there, officials announced Thursday. Tuition for full-time undergraduate students will remain at $28,932 for 2015-16 and fees at $910, maintaining a promise the college had made to keep tuition and fees under $30,000 until May of this year. Total costs, including room and board, will be $41,868 at the Catholic college in Radnor, which enrolls 1,360 undergraduate students and about 1,000 graduate students.
SPORTS
December 15, 2014 | By Christian Hetrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samir Doughty scored a school-record 47 points, and Math, Civics, and Sciences beat visiting Elmer L. Meyers, 89-63, Saturday in a nonleague boys' basketball game. Doughty held the previous record of 45 points. The St. John's recruit broke the record on a one-handed layup with 5 minutes, 13 seconds left in the fourth quarter. Doughty had 21 points in the final period. Coaches vs. Cancer. Lamarr Kimble scored 27 points as Neumann-Goretti defeated Susquehanna Township, 70-62, at Cheltenham.
SPORTS
December 8, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dominant second half helped Pennsbury beat Lower Merion, 53-41, in the main event of the Philadelphia Inquirer/Scholastic Play-by-Play Tipoff Classic on Saturday at Philadelphia University. The Falcons, ranked seventh in the preseason in Southeastern Pennsylvania by The Inquirer, went on a 40-16 run to wipe out what was a five-point deficit after one quarter. Derrick Woods scored 18 points and Cameron Jones added 12. Mehki Bryant and Juan Perez Jones each had eight. Corey Sherman led Lower Merion with 12. Also at the showcase: Chris Clover's double-double of 28 points and 12 rebounds carried St. Joseph's Prep to a 56-32 win over Bartram.
SPORTS
December 8, 2014 | By Christian Hetrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Megan Camden and Holly Schanck each sank two free throws in overtime, and the Downingtown West girls' basketball team outlasted Great Valley, 35-30, Saturday in the Great Valley Tipoff Shoot-Out. Camden and Schanck finished with seven and five points, respectively. Hannah Supplee led the team with 11 points. Stephanie Aker hit a game-tying three with less than 30 seconds left for Great Valley. Ashlyn Smith scored 11 of her game-high 14 points in the third quarter for the Patriots.
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