CollectionsSats
IN THE NEWS

Sats

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Pauline Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
In attempting to explain what Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SATs) really mean, William Elliott, a trustee of the College Entrance Examination Board, told a Great Valley audience more about what they don't mean. Elliott, vice president for enrollment at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, vowed at the start to present his personal view of college entrance requirements. He ranked SATs as fourth in importance of seven criteria considered in the admissions process by most small selective colleges.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
To my knowledge, How I Got Into College marks Hollywood's first attempt at SATire. It is a broadly drawn comedy about the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SATs) for all those benighted souls who remember staring blankly at multiple choices about when two trains traveling at different speeds will pass each other. And, let's face it, that's a lot of us - not to mention all those high school seniors who still have to live in annual dread of SATs. How I Got Into College is directed by Savage Steve Holland without the savagery this wholesale national sorting method invites.
NEWS
February 28, 2001
It was refreshing to see the News take a conservative position defending SAT scores for college admissions (editorial, Feb. 23). Although it is not said, those who want to do away with SATs are motivated by the fact that minority students do far worse on these tests than white and Asian students, and are thus denied admission to the better colleges. In reality, the SATs do these people a service in weeding them out before they take up spots that should go to more qualified students, only to fail miserably.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Dodge Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
When high school seniors rip open college decision letters, it's perhaps unavoidable that they feel for an instant as if brushed by the wings of death. Most will have had a similar feeling, maybe several times, when they open letters announcing scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Are SATs all that important? Should families get so worked up about a test whose validity has been under fire and which some well-known colleges no longer require? The answer isn't simple.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
WHEN I entered Temple in September of 1956, I was not required to take what was then called the College Boards because I finished in the upper 25 percent of my class at South Philadelphia High School. Temple required only that I take placements tests for English and math. Forgive me, then, if I'm puzzled by Dom Giordano's concerns that Temple's decision to forego the SATs is going to dilute the quality of its student body. I agree with Giordano that an "A" at a suburban high school may be worth more than an "A" at an inner-city school, and that is also the problem.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
I ALWAYS felt like a little bit of an imposter in college. It wasn't that I was straight and a significant percentage of the Bryn Mawr population loved both Virginia Woolf and Emily Dickinson. (Take whatever inference you want from that . . . ) It wasn't that I was pro-life and most of my sister students were busy protecting their ovaries from my rosaries. It wasn't that I loved football, and the only Eagles they were interested in were the ones on the endangered-species list.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A women's think tank said yesterday that women score lower than men on the Scholastic Aptitude Text largely because some questions are biased in favor of men. A two-year study done for the Center for Women's Policy Studies found 12 to 16 percent of SAT questions were sexually biased - nearly all against women - because they were posed in contexts more familiar to men, such as sports, war and, in one case, "a boys' camp. " The SAT, taken by high school students planning to attend college, has been widely criticized for racial bias and for failing to accurately predict a student's college performance.
NEWS
March 9, 2006 | By Jeff Price INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a highly nervous time of year for college applicants, all students need is another reason to raise anxiety levels. So it will be good for 2006-07 freshmen to hear, based on a sampling yesterday of area universities, that errors in SAT scores acknowledged by the College Board won't have a significant impact on admissions. The board, which administers the SATs, said yesterday on its Web site that it "recently discovered a technical processing matter" and that about 4,000 of 495,000 test-takers "did not receive credit for some correct answers.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paige Ramsey weighed in with the combined Scholastic Aptitude Test score of about 950. Right away she could have forgotten the University of Pennsylvania, unless she was already halfway to finding a cure for cancer. Penn's incoming freshman class next month will boast median SAT scores of 1275 (1600 is perfection). That score also would have put Paige on a "real suspicious list" had she applied to Drexel University, says Drexel's dean of admissions. Drexel likes to see at a score of at least 1000.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | BY CHUCK STONE
Do you have the intelligence of a second-grader or an 11th-grader? To find out, you can answer the following test question: Which of the following statements about standardized tests such as the SAT is true. a. They really don't measure how intelligent you are. b. High school grade point averages are more accurate than SATs in predicting how well students will do as college freshmen. c. Women generally have higher grade point averages than men, but perform more poorly on SATs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell, Staff Writer
Inside Abington Senior High School on Saturday, anxious students joined thousands across Pennsylvania and New Jersey in sitting for the new SAT - the exam's first major overhaul in over a decade. As if high school juniors and seniors don't have enough on their restless minds, preparing to take the heavily redesigned test added a level of uncertainty. With its release finally here, students can now grade the new test. Sean Welch, 16, a junior who took the SAT at Cheltenham High School, said the math section was challenging, but he gave the new exam high marks for matching his schoolwork.
NEWS
March 7, 2016
THE BIG DAY has arrived: Saturday, March 5, the debut of the College Board's new SAT. As college-bound juniors gnashed their teeth last week and sharpened their No. 2 pencils in preparation, staff writer Steve Bohnel talked with 26-year-old entrepreneur Shaan Patel, who leveraged his own perfect 2400 score on the old SAT into a Shark Tank -funded test-prep business that recently opened a branch in King of Prussia. In addition to building his 2400 Expert SAT Prep business - now with a $250,000 investment from TV "shark" and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban - Patel is a medical student at the University of Southern California and MBA candidate at Yale.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
The University of Delaware will allow instate applicants to choose not to submit SAT or ACT scores, becoming the latest school to decide that requiring high test scores may deter otherwise excellent students. The university faculty senate Monday approved a four-year pilot program for students beginning in fall 2017. Applicants can still submit test scores for consideration, and all students will be required to submit test scores after they are accepted so the university can evaluate the effectiveness of the pilot program.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Last year Yaseena Ali, now a 16-year-old junior at Upper Merion High School, invested precious weekend hours in a time-honored ritual for the college-bound youth of America: studying flash cards of abstruse vocabulary words - such as abstruse . The hard work helped her ace the PSAT, widely considered a practice round of the college-entrance exam. But now as Ali prepares for her all-important SAT in early March, those flash cards are in storage. In the first overhaul of the nation's best-known college entrance exam in more than a decade, the revamped SAT - Scholastic Aptitude Test - that debuts March 5 will make dramatic changes in how the test is given and scored.
NEWS
January 7, 2016
By Donna R. Cooper As Mayor Kenney takes the reins and Gov. Wolf turns the corner on his first year in office, an opportunity to make a serious impact on the commonwealth's largest city lies in Philadelphia's neighborhood high schools. Here's why: More than half the city's public school students prepare for their futures in our neighborhood high schools, where potential is going untapped year after year. How so? Last year, only 64 percent of neighborhood high school students graduated, compared with 95 percent of magnet school students and 89 percent in citywide-admissions schools.
NEWS
September 3, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Essays will get less emphasis in the admissions process at two of the region's elite schools, Swarthmore College and the University of Pennsylvania. Swarthmore announced Tuesday that it would not consider the essay section of the soon-to-be redesigned SAT, nor the essay on its counterpart, the ACT. It will, however, continue to require students to submit an essay on "Why Swarthmore" with their applications. The College Board, owner of the SAT, announced more than a year ago that the essay portion would become optional when the redesigned SAT is introduced in early 2016.
SPORTS
August 5, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
DeMarco Murray practiced without issue on Monday, which would not be so noteworthy if he had done the same on Sunday. But Murray did not participate in team drills on the first day of Eagles training camp, and the prized free-agent signing did not have an explanation for his conspicuous absence. Murray, the defending NFL rushing champion with the Dallas Cowboys, said that his lack of participation was a coach's decision. He added that he was not injured. "You're always upset when you don't get the chance to go out there and compete and take the pressure off the other guys," Murray said.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2010, John Erlenbach walked away from a job at Acme Markets, where he had worked in every area from produce to shelf stocking for 20 years since leaving the Navy. "I wasn't well," Erlenbach, 61, said. He struggled with depression, couldn't hold a job or keep an apartment, grew apart from his five kids, and was homeless for years - sleeping on couches, the street, or in shelters in Salem and Camden Counties. On Wednesday, Erlenbach stood in front of his one-bedroom townhouse at Riverfront Village in Pennsauken, a 75-unit affordable-housing complex for working families earning less than 60 percent of the area's median household income, as well as five previously homeless veterans.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Alexa Middleton finished taking the SAT on June 6, she flopped onto her parents' bed: "I'm done. I did it. " She would tell her mother later, "I don't want to take that test ever again. " But the 17-year-old rising senior at Abington Friends School in Jenkintown would get an awful surprise a few days later. Because of a printing error, the College Board, which owns the SAT, announced that it would not score two sections of the test - one in reading, one in math - given to 487,000 students in the United States on that Saturday.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CONTROVERSIAL parcel of land for which the Nutter administration wants to pay more than $7.2 million was once the site of a scrap-metal firm that dismantled a ship exposed to atomic-bomb tests in the Marshall Islands after World War II, the Daily News has learned. The USS Niagara, a wartime naval-transport ship, in July 1946 became a "target ship" in Operation Crossroads, in which the U.S. conducted atomic-bomb tests "using nuclear devices very similar to the one dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945," according to a document obtained from the U.S. Defense Department's Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|