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June 27, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
TED LUCKENBILL, who played for the Philadelphia Warriors in Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point game, has died of cancer at the age of 72. The Callaway-Allee funeral home in Crockett, Texas, where Luckenbill lived for 20 years, said he died Sunday in Dallas. Luckenbill starred for the University of Houston from 1958-61. He averaged 16.6 points and 9.7 rebounds while helping Houston to its first two winning seasons under Guy Lewis. Drafted 15th overall by the Warriors in 1961, he played in only 87 NBA games before he was diagnosed with testicular cancer at the age of 23. His professional claim to fame came on March 2, 1962, when he grabbed two offensive rebounds in the final 2 minutes to help Chamberlain hit 100 points in the Warriors' 169-147 victory over New York.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Doris Bedrossian Bobb of Drexel Hill has already had an extended tour in Saudi Arabia. As a civilian, that is. Bobb had traveled with her husband, Arthur, an ophthalmologist, who was part of a Harvard research team trying to eradicate an eye disease in Saudi Arabia. When Bobb stepped off a plane in Saudi Arabia in November 1963, "it was very hazy, very hot," she recalled. "I was overwhelmed. A lot of women arrived and went back on the next plane. " Bobb, now 68, stayed 18 years.
NEWS
June 17, 2011
By Mai Yamani The unexpected visibility and assertiveness of women has helped propel what has become known as the Arab spring. Major changes have occurred in the minds and lives of women, helping them break the shackles of the past and demand their freedom and dignity. Since January 2011, images of millions of women demonstrating alongside men have been beamed around the world. One saw women from all walks of life marching for a better future for themselves and their countries.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Arab leaders have agreed to send troops to Saudi Arabia after Iraq's Saddam Hussein refused to end his nine-day-old occupation of neighboring Kuwait and instead called for a holy war against rich oil sheiks. Also yesterday, European powers agreed to bolster the U.S. flotilla in the Persian Gulf. But they didn't promise any ground troops to join American GIs digging into the Saudi desert to protect the world's biggest oil exporter from Iraqi forces massed over the northern border in Kuwait.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The rhetorical de-escalation of the crisis in the Persian Gulf continued yesterday as the Saudi defense minister told reporters here that his kingdom could not be used by any nation as a staging ground for non-defensive military action. Sultan ibn Abd al-Aziz, the brother of King Fahd, said Saudi Arabia was "a defensive country" with no interest in initiating hostilities or allowing others to do so from its soil in its name. "The kingdom of Saudi Arabia is not a theater for any action (by others)
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | By Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
It's TGIF in the desert, and time to see what your genial host, 1st Sgt. Tony Mottola, is cooking up. Mottola, 42, a Germantown native, is the career Air Force noncom in charge of fun - and counseling. At a hardship post where wine, women and song are all forbidden, Mottola's best form of entertainment is talking. But he does have other resources. Last Friday, as the sun set and desert temperatures dropped into the 80s, Mottola was at the end of a runway, outside the recreation trailer, stirring a pot of beans and tossing steaks on a grill.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Iraq said yesterday that it decided to pull back thousands of Iraqi pilgrims from Saudi Arabia after the Saudis surrounded them with tanks and armored vehicles. Official Baghdad television quoted a senior Iraqi official who accompanied the pilgrims, who had been headed to Mecca as part of the annual hajj, as saying the Saudis also turned down an Iraqi demand that expenses of the pilgrims be withdrawn from Iraq's assets frozen in Arab and foreign banks. The charges followed recent tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iraq, which accuses the Saudis of allowing U.S. and British planes to use its bases to launch air strikes on Iraq.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
How do you solve a problem like Saudi Arabia? President Obama's visit to Saudi Arabia this week will have little impact on the mounting American hostility toward the Saudis. Now that the United States is no longer dependent on Riyadh for oil, U.S. officials feel free to vent the pent-up anger that has been building for years. The most recent example is the bill in Congress that would allow Americans to sue the Saudi government if it is found to have played a role in the Sept.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Cargo planes ferrying Moroccan troops arrived in Saudi Arabia yesterday to join 3,000 Egyptian soldiers in defending the Saudis against a possible attack by Iraqi troops occupying neighboring Kuwait. Syrian troops are also expected to arrive in Saudi Arabia soon - unconfirmed reports said some arrived today - and a senior Egyptian defense official told The Washington Post that his country was prepared to send three or four more divisions if needed. On the tense waters of the Persian Gulf, meanwhile, two Iraqi tankers were turned away when they tried to dock in the United Arab Emirates in violation of a United Nations ban on trade with Iraq.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
President Obama is threatening to veto legislation that would make it easier for victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks to sue Saudi Arabia. Supporters of the bill vow that they will push for a congressional override. The measure is an outgrowth of a long-running lawsuit against the government of Saudi Arabia by 9/11 victims and their families, who claim that the Saudis funded Islamist charities that in turn bankrolled al-Qaeda. The suit was filed by the Center City firm of Cozen O'Connor, which was instrumental in pushing for enactment of the bill.
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
IF YOU believe Selena Gomez , the 24-yearold singer/actress who's been on her Revival World Tour, is taking some time off to recharge, rejuvenate and de-stress to revive herself . "As many of you know, around a year ago I revealed that I have lupus, an illness that can affect people in different ways," Selena stated exclusively to People magazine. "I've discovered that anxiety, panic attacks and depression can be side effects of lupus, which can present their own challenges. "I want to be proactive and focus on maintaining my health and happiness and have decided that the best way forward is to take some time off. Thank you to all my fans for your support.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Of all the tantalizing strands in the now declassified report on the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks is the testimony of an FBI agent that a suspected actor in the plot had many contacts with the head of air traffic control in Saudi Arabia. The implication: What better way to suss out weaknesses of the U.S. civil aviation system before the hijackings than to confer with an expert. For years, the government of Saudi Arabia dismissed claims in a lawsuit that it had something to do with the Sept.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
A long-classified document suggesting involvement by Saudi Arabian government employees in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was released by the House Intelligence Committee on Friday after a campaign by families and victims for its disclosure. The 28 pages - available at philly.com/911saudi - had been classified for 14 years until Friday afternoon. "While in the United States, some of the September 11 hijackers were in contact with, and received support or assistance from, individuals who may be connected to the Saudi government," the report says.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Osama bin Laden was on the run. But not to worry; the Justice Department had his back. Soon after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, as lawyers for families and victims scoured the globe for evidence, they asked for a copy of bin Laden's Interpol arrest warrant, issued at the request of the Justice Department. Justice did get back to the lawyers, but not with the answer they wanted. The U.S. government could not release any information without bin Laden's permission because to do so "generally constitutes an unwarranted invasion of privacy," wrote Edgar Smith, a Justice Department official who coordinated information requests with Interpol.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
Given America's long-running battle with Islamist terrorists - a battle that won't end soon - we need to know which countries support terrorists under the table. Especially when those countries are supposed to be allies. So it's bizarre that the U.S. government still refuses to release the infamous 28 pages of the 2002 report of the joint congressional inquiry into the 9/11 attacks. These classified pages supposedly implicate some Saudi officials in assisting the hijackers. As former Sen. Bob Graham (D., Fla.)
BUSINESS
May 19, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
In a vote that could greatly complicate relations with a key Middle East ally, the Senate on Tuesday voted unanimously to expand the ability of U.S. citizens to sue the government of Saudi Arabia for its alleged role in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The bill, sponsored by Sens. Charles Schumer (D., N.Y.) and John Cornyn (R., Texas), clarifies that foreign governments can be sued for supporting terrorism acts even when they occur outside the United States. Dozens of insurers and thousands of victims and families are suing Saudi Arabia for its alleged role in the attacks, alleging that Saudi government employees helped form a support network for the 9/11 attackers.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
After months of intense advocacy by families of victims of the 9/11 attacks and aggressive pushback from the Obama administration, the U.S. Senate is nearing a vote on a bill that would broaden the basis for suing Saudi Arabia for its alleged role in the plot. The bill has been pushed by 9/11 survivors and their families and by insurers that paid out tens of billions of dollars as a result of the hijackings and the losses at ground zero. It is intended to bolster a 13-year-old lawsuit against the Saudi kingdom alleging that government-supported Islamist charities helped finance the 9/11 attackers.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
How do you solve a problem like Saudi Arabia? President Obama's visit to Saudi Arabia this week will have little impact on the mounting American hostility toward the Saudis. Now that the United States is no longer dependent on Riyadh for oil, U.S. officials feel free to vent the pent-up anger that has been building for years. The most recent example is the bill in Congress that would allow Americans to sue the Saudi government if it is found to have played a role in the Sept.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
If you're going to engage in a foreign policy capitulation, might as well do it when everyone is getting tanked and otherwise occupied. Say, New Year's Eve. Here's the story. In October, Iran test-fires a nuclear-capable ballistic missile in brazen violation of unanimous Security Council resolutions. President Obama does nothing. One month later, Iran does it again. The administration makes a few gestures at the United Nations. Then nothing. Then finally, on Dec. 30, the White House announces a few sanctions.
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