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Sauerkraut

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NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
Albert C. Kissling, Philadelphia's sauerkraut king who started his multimillion-dollar business out of the back seat of a roadster, died Monday. He was 82 and lived in Ardmore. Kissling, who founded the A.C. Kissling Co., in Fishtown, was hospitalized Saturday with a heart ailment. He started his own business in 1927 as a "meat-jobber. " He bought meat from slaughterhouses, threw it on an ice block in his father's car, then sold the meat to stores. At the same time, he decided to resurrect his father's sauerkraut business.
FOOD
March 23, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Some delicacies are not so delicate. Take anchovies, for example, or Roquefort cheese and balsamic vinegar. The aroma of truffles lends itself more to mulching than munching, just as a whiff of fine Parmesan seems closer to something predigested than digestible. But for a food that goes straight for the tear ducts, there's none to compete with a pungent crock of kraut. Sauerkraut is neither expensive nor difficult to prepare, but it does take time and regular attention. If you want to make your own, you'll need some firm, heavy-headed white cabbage, a few handfuls of pure kosher or pickling salt, and a large ceramic crock or glass jar. Then, all it takes is a cool cellar and two to four weeks of weighting, stirring, prodding and tasting.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
The Kapusta Squeezers Ball is kaput. At least for this year. Seems not enough people were juiced about it. And juice is what Port Richmond's Kapusta Squeezers Ball is all about. Why, the ball's very foundation was built on juice. Kapusta juice. Kapusta. Polish for sauerkraut. Whatever you call it, juice is the highlight of the evening. Goes like this. Men and women roll up their sleeves, lean over, dig a hand as deep as they can into a 50-pound barrel of sauerkraut and scoop out as much as their hand can hold.
FOOD
January 11, 1995 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some delicacies are not so delicate. Take sardines, for example; Gorgonzola or kimchi. The aroma of morels lends itself more to mulching than munching, and the perfume of caviar can be downright fishy. And for a food that goes straight for the tear ducts, there's none to compete with a pungent crock of sauerkraut. Preserving ingredients through spicing and pickling is one of the most ancient culinary endeavors. Before the widespread use of ice and refrigeration to help retain the natural qualities of fresh food, preserved meats and vegetables were the norm.
FOOD
February 23, 2000 | Daily News research/National Hot Dog and Sausage Council
Here's how we like our dogs, from coast to coast: East: Consumes more all-beef hot dogs than any other region. South: Second to the West in its consumption of poultry dogs. Many local varieties are piled with vegetables ("dragged through the garden") and topped with cole slaw. Midwest: Consumes more pork-and-beef franks. West: Consumes more poultry dogs than any other region. TOPPED DOGS Berkeley - Lettuce and tomatoes. Chicago - Onions, mustard, dark green relish, kosher pickle, tomatoes, peppers, celery salt on a poppyseed bun. Detroit - Meat sauce.
FOOD
March 20, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Food historians disagree about who created the first Reuben. Some say the inventor was New York deli owner Arthur Reuben (who used ham instead of corned beef); others claim it was an Omaha grocer named Reuben Kay (who built the sandwich during a poker game). But there's no debate about the origins of the first smoked salmon Reuben. Built with fresh lox, Cheddar cheese, sauerkraut and a spicy dressing, the reinvented Reuben was an instant hit when it debuted three years ago at Old City's Philadelphia Fish and Co. Now it's a permanent - and still popular - item on the 20-year-old restaurant's lunch menu.
FOOD
October 1, 1986 | By NETTIE DUFFIELD, Special to the Daily News
Now that days are getting shorter and there is a hint of autumn in the air, we can pull out some cold-weather meal ideas. One of my favorites always has been that grand melange of pork, sauerkraut and mixed sausages called Choucroute Garni. Traditionally served with boiled new potatoes and lots of mustards, this Alsatian dish usually calls for a pork loin and at least four species of sausage. Just because I am dining alone does not mean I must be deprived of this divine taste, so I make this simplified version at home on cold fall evenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
There are plenty of pubs where you can guzzle green beers this St. Patty's Day. But there aren't too many places where you wash 'em down with an Irish grinder at 2:30 a.m. That's because not every place is Jay's Elbow Room on Route 73 in Maple Shade, N.J. Jay's has been around since '54, and has been owned by Don Mann since '78. These days Mann's son-in-law Tommy helps run the bar. Jay's is well known for serving $1 lunch specials, inexpensive pitchers...
FOOD
May 2, 2001 | by Rachel Rogala For the Daily News
One of the elements that makes a traditional Reuben sandwich taste so good is the rye bread. However, at Hymie's Merion Deli at 342 Montgomery Ave., Merion, the "Reuben Latke" switches rye for another ingredient - potato pancakes (latkes). It's an open-faced sandwich that incorporates the usual Reuben flavors - sauerkraut, corned beef, Swiss cheese, Russian dressing. But the potato latkes give it a fun twist. Owner Louis Barson (who practically grew up in the business since his family bought the original deli from Hymie in 1974)
FOOD
January 29, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
SWEET . . . Don't be afraid to indulge your craving for ice cream. So says Arun Kilara, a Pennsylvania State University food scientist. "Somehow people have the notion that ice cream and frozen desserts are major contributors of fat in our diets, and this is not the case," Kilara says. Although it does contain fat, Kilara says, ice cream also contains such nutritional pluses as protein, calcium and carbohydrates. . . . AND SAUER Sauerkraut on pizza? It's all the rage in Montana.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Uleckinger family's journey from Germany to Philadelphia ended in catastrophe. Father Jacob and three of his children died on a ship called the Charming Molly as it crossed the Atlantic in 1773, and the mother passed just days after reaching the New World. The two surviving children, Peter, 13, and Andrew, 9, were sold into servitude to pay for the voyage - a case for the German Society of Pennsylvania. Twelve years before the United States became a nation, more-established immigrants from the Vaterland founded the society in 1764 to protect and support countrymen such as young Peter and Andrew, who arrived short of money and signed contracts in a language they did not understand.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the indignities suffered by pregnant women are the clunky straps belted around the belly to measure contractions and fetal heart rate, tethered by wire to an electronic monitor. What woman would not prefer a soft, stretchy, wireless alternative called the Belly Band? Check it out in a Drexel University lab on Sunday. Or if pregnancy is not your thing, head outside to Smith Playground to shoot off Alka-Seltzer rockets and meet the soap-bubble monster. Still no good?
NEWS
May 31, 2012
2 tablespoons vegetable oil 4 slices bacon, chopped 1 yellow onion, chopped 1 teaspoon juniper berries 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds 3 bay leaves 2 12-ounce bottles of lager, such as Spaten or Warsteiner 2 16-ounce cans sauerkraut 1 large smoked pork chop 2 links bratwurst 2 links bauernwurst or kielbasa   1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. 2. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium heat and add the oil, bacon, and onion.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
2 pounds young or baby bunch carrots (peeled baby carrots can be used if necessary) 4 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons sherry vinegar 2 tablespoons Montreal Steak Seasoning 1/2 teaspoon ground clove 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons black pepper 2 teaspoons crushed fresh garlic 12-ounce can of garbanzo beans, drained 6 ounces canned or jarred sauerkraut, with some of its juice 2 tablespoons chopped...
FOOD
February 25, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Polish call them golabki and Russians golubtsy . In Azerbaijan, they're kelem dolmasi , and generations of Jewish grandmothers called them prakkes . But it is stuffed cabbage all the same. And by any name it is deliciously satisfying on cold winter days. Some recipes use beef, pork, or lamb, rice or barley, onion and parsley. Others add apples, raisins, sauerkraut, bacon, or tomatoes. They're served with an avgolemono or egg-and-lemon sauce in Greece.
SPORTS
January 7, 2009
PREHEAT THE OVEN to 350. Then stick your head in it if you think you need to apologize to Andy Reid for anything you thought or said or wrote when the Eagles were 5-5-1 and their playoff hopes were on life support. Just kidding. This recipe serves six, so invite five other guys who feel the way you do. Brown six crow breasts in a skillet. Place them on an inch-and-a-half layer of sauerkraut in a casserole dish. Cover each breast with a strip of bacon and some chopped onion. Then add another layer of sauerkraut and bake for 2 hours.
FOOD
June 7, 2007
To say the Sidecar Bar & Grille is "on a roll" would just trivialize with a cheap pun what chef Rich Freedman and owner Adam Ritter are doing in their gastro-pub near Graduate Hospital in South Philly. Freedman, working in a tiny kitchen, turns out scratch charcuterie - Cajun sausage made of raw pork and pork liver, chorizo, Tasso ham, country pate, and hickory-and-alder-smoked knackwurst. Take the knackwurst, which comes with a salad and homemade sauerkraut. At $9.95, it's not the cheapest sandwich around.
NEWS
July 27, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On a recent Saturday evening at Shady Maple Smorgasbord, a woman wearing a black apron and the cap of a Mennonite was busy working around the bins of a buffet station. She had a lot to clean. The place that has been described as the "temple of gluttony" recently expanded and now can serve as many as 1,200 people at a time. That night, judging from globs of gravy and spillage from what seemed like miles of stainless-steel serving trays, all 1,200 people showed up. I watched with fascination as the woman efficiently rearranged a group of fruit pies, seemingly oblivious to the fact that the desserts looked as if they had gone through a pie-throwing contest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
There are plenty of pubs where you can guzzle green beers this St. Patty's Day. But there aren't too many places where you wash 'em down with an Irish grinder at 2:30 a.m. That's because not every place is Jay's Elbow Room on Route 73 in Maple Shade, N.J. Jay's has been around since '54, and has been owned by Don Mann since '78. These days Mann's son-in-law Tommy helps run the bar. Jay's is well known for serving $1 lunch specials, inexpensive pitchers...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Going solo this Valentine's? That doesn't mean you can't get some lip lovin.' Chef David Grear of La Terrasse in University City named one of his sandwiches the "French Kiss," because its recipe is French - and it calls for tongue. Grossed out by eating a cow's tasting organ? Don't be. "You'd swear it was corned beef," says Grear. Still, preparing it requires a strong stomach - and a sharp knife to slice off the tough outer layer (covered by taste buds). FRENCH KISS SANDWICH FROM LA TERRASSE For remoulade: 3/4 cup mayonnaise 1 hard-boiled egg, chopped 1 dozen capers, chopped 1/2 teaspoon tomato paste 2 teaspoon white wine vinegar Pinch sugar 1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley tarragon 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Blend all ingredients.
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