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NEWS
March 14, 2013
D EAR HARRY: Is the federal government trying to discourage the sale and redemption of E and EE savings bonds? Has funding for the Treasury Department been cut? Are future cuts pending? Redeeming the old paper bonds has become a nightmare. We no longer can buy paper bonds, either. The Treasury says they will be issued only as part of a tax refund. Now, it appears that you can buy "electronic" bonds only online through a ridiculously complicated process for even the more-savvy computer users.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1992 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
In case you didn't notice, U.S. Savings Bonds purchased in December haven't yet arrived in the mail. Not to worry. Those Christmas gift bonds aren't lost or stolen - simply delayed. It seems the Fed couldn't handle the added crush of customers shopping for higher interest rates on various U.S. Treasury securities. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia is buried under an avalanche of 100,000 bond applications in December from Christmas shoppers and refugees from low-interest bank deposits and money market funds.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1986 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
If buying U.S. savings bonds is a way of buying stock in America, no state in the union is more patriotic than Pennsylvania. During the first 11 months of last year, Pennsylvanians bought $573.5 million worth of series EE and HH savings bonds - more than any other state. Only six states, in fact, topped the total of $198.7 million logged by Philadelphia, Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties alone. And that already voracious appetite for savings bonds is increasing.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1990 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beginning this year, parents who buy U.S. savings bonds and use them to pay for their children's college tuition may qualify for a tax break: The bonds can earn interest tax-free. The favored tax treatment applies to Series EE bonds purchased after Jan. 1. But to qualify, a family must meet certain income requirements and have purchased the bonds in the name of one or both parents. When the bonds are redeemed, they must have a child enrolled in an accredited institution. However, some tax experts say the Education Savings Bond Program is not such an all-around great deal.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
   Sorry, savers of a certain age, but the rates on some of your savings bonds just went down again.    For the Series I Savings Bond, the rate will be 0.74 percent on bonds bought between Monday and April 30, 2011, the federal Bureau of the Public Debt announced Monday.    That includes a fixed rate of 0 percent, which applies for the 30-year interest- bearing life of the bond, and an inflation-adjusted rate of 0.74 percent. That variable rate changes every May 1 and Nov. 1.    At least the calendar period used by the Treasury Department actually found some inflation this time.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1990 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beginning yesterday, people who buy U.S. savings bonds in eastern Pennsylvania will have to wait for up to three weeks before they are delivered. The U.S. Treasury has changed the way bonds are purchased from banks and other financial institutions. Instead of receiving the bonds directly at the time of purchase, customers now must fill out forms and have the bonds mailed to them within 15 working days. The Regional Delivery System first was tested in Ohio in 1987, and Western Pennsylvania was added last June.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
For three days, people pored over valuables left behind by unfortunates - the victims of amnesia, the friendless dead, the lost and forgotten - in search of bargains. They scrutinized mink coats, gold watches, wedding bands. It almost didn't seem right. Then again, money's money. In this case, $239,647 was collected by the state Treasury for 5,301 items that had been squirreled away and left unclaimed for more than seven years in places such as safety-deposit boxes. "People are very private about their financial affairs," said Michael W. Arpey, general counsel to State Treasurer Catherine Baker Knoll.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The government will start selling a new U.S. Savings Bond in September that is meant to protect investors against inflation as they save for retirement, college or other expenses. Starting Sept. 1, the Treasury Department will sell savings bonds indexed to the Consumer Price Index in denominations as small as $50. They will be issued at face value. Vice President Gore and Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin introduced the new savings bonds - dubbed I-bonds - in a ceremony yesterday.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | By Kate Campbell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A King of Prussia teenager has been charged with conspiring to steal a box containing $104,000 in U.S. Savings Bonds from her 81-year-old grandmother's house. Police said Alisha Kathryn Linfante, 18, of the 600 block of Coates Lane, was arrested last week at her boyfriend's Royersford home after her father's mother, Margaret Linfante, reported to police that the bonds had been stolen from a fireproof safe in her closet. "I noticed the closet door was open, and my safe, which I had wrapped in a quilt, was gone," Margaret Linfante of Eagleville said yesterday.
NEWS
May 11, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
U.S. Savings Bonds may sound old-fashioned, but they're still great gifts for birthday, graduation or bar mitzvah. Offering decent returns and ironclad security, savings bonds are an attractive alternative for people whipsawed by plunging stock and bond prices and low returns on bank deposits. The minimum return on Series EE savings bonds is 4 percent for the first five years. But the variable rate, which kicks in after five years, jumped to 4.7 percent this month. Even the guaranteed 4 percent return is better than many other risk-free investments.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2013
D EAR HARRY: Is the federal government trying to discourage the sale and redemption of E and EE savings bonds? Has funding for the Treasury Department been cut? Are future cuts pending? Redeeming the old paper bonds has become a nightmare. We no longer can buy paper bonds, either. The Treasury says they will be issued only as part of a tax refund. Now, it appears that you can buy "electronic" bonds only online through a ridiculously complicated process for even the more-savvy computer users.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
We receive pleas for assistance from readers quite often, especially those holding hard-earned savings in certificates of deposit, or bank CDs. The interest rate earned on these is not even keeping up with inflation, currently tracking between 1 percent and 2 percent. Cry for help received! Series I savings bonds can offer savers a way to earn better-than-average returns. Sold by the U.S. Treasury, I-bonds offer rates that fluctuate with the inflation rate, which usually increases when the economy improves.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Siana Norton beat the odds. Having faced down homelessness, academic struggles, and a culture of discouragement, the 18-year-old is now headed to the University of California, Riverside, to study chemistry and become a pharmacist. "I see a lot of people on the streets, and it encourages me to do better," she said at Thursday night's 22d annual State Representative Awards ceremony at Temple University, where she and 34 other students were awarded for persevering in the face of struggles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I'm 30 years old and have a close relationship with my mother, but something is bothering me. When I was a little girl, my grandmother gave me a U.S. savings bond for my birthday. It has matured to its full value. My mother refuses to give it to me. She said that my grandmother intended it as a wedding gift. The last time I brought it up, she got teary and emotional. When my grandmother died 18 years ago, it was tremendously painful for my mother. I think the reason Mom won't give me the money is it makes her feel like her mom is still around.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2010 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
   Sorry, savers of a certain age, but the rates on some of your savings bonds just went down again.    For the Series I Savings Bond, the rate will be 0.74 percent on bonds bought between Monday and April 30, 2011, the federal Bureau of the Public Debt announced Monday.    That includes a fixed rate of 0 percent, which applies for the 30-year interest- bearing life of the bond, and an inflation-adjusted rate of 0.74 percent. That variable rate changes every May 1 and Nov. 1.    At least the calendar period used by the Treasury Department actually found some inflation this time.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2009 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Investing in the stock market hasn't paid off well lately. But what about bonds? It all depends. And, as with stocks, venturing into the world of bonds requires study and caution. Get those at these sites. Bond basics. This site by the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, a trade group, has information for people just considering bond investments and for seasoned investors. It bills itself as a "source of bond price information and includes a wide variety of market data, news, commentary and information about bonds.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2009 | By Eileen Ambrose, BALTIMORE SUN
If you have been checking coat pockets for spare change, you know that every cent counts these days. Yet a big chunk of change is sitting at government agencies waiting to be claimed. That includes $16.5 billion in matured U.S. savings bonds as well as millions in forgotten bank accounts, insurance proceeds, and safe-deposit boxes. Savings bonds. About 41 million U.S. savings bonds have matured and no longer earn interest. Most of them are Series E and H bonds dating back as far as 1941.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buying U.S. savings bonds for the grandkids is pure Norman Rockwell. Trouble is, after being jazzed up to stay competitive with other savings instruments, the bonds themselves are more like Pablo Picasso. A reporter recently toured bank branches in downtown Media to buy a bond from the four largest area banks, hoping to hear enough information to make a thoughtful decision. Wachovia Bank, PNC Bank, Citizens Bank and Commerce Bank went 0 for 4. The test illustrates the challenges large banks face as they get back to basics.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government outsold Amazon.com online last year, with most of the $3.6 billion in Web-generated revenue to federal sites coming from cyber sales of savings bonds and other securities, according to a new study. The federal government operates 164 Web sites that offer to the public such products and services as wild mustangs, oil-drilling leases, a mothballed Coast Guard cutter, and fancy sports cars confiscated in drug busts, according to the authors of the study. Amazon.
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