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Savion Glover

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NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On this night, the face of bebop wasn't Dizzy Gillespie's puffed-up cheeks or Charlie Parker's elongated jaw. It was Savion Glover's size-12 1/2 feet. With sweat popping off his forehead and the top of his pink shirt drenched to orange, Glover personified jazz in all its frenetic glory Wednesday at Baltimore's Hippodrome Performing Arts Center, his legs driving the rhythm in a way that would make Max Roach proud. If audience reaction is any indication, Improvography II will continue the job that Glover's Tony-winning Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk started in 1996 - squashing the notion that tap dancers are passe shuffle-steppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Ask Savion Glover the purpose of his new show, Savion Glover in Foot Notes: The Concert, and in his self-deprecating, hip manner he replies, "It's just basically about hangin' out. "I grew up with these cats - [Jimmy] Slyde and [Buster] Brown," adds the 26-year-old Glover, who has been a recognized dancing phenomenon since he was 10. "We were always on tour or something like that, and it's been a long time since we hung out. " On the bill with Glover in Foot Notes, which runs Tuesday through next Sunday at the Merriam Theater, are the septuagenarian Slyde, the octogenarian Brown, veteran dancer Dianne Walker, and 10-year-old Cartier A. Williams.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
Savion Glover doesn't so much take the stage as reign over it. His control is impeccable, his invention boundless, his attack the last word. No wonder the audience at Improvography II leapt to its feet for a standing ovation opening night Tuesday at the Merriam Theater. Joined by his jazz band The Otherz and in the second half by three fellow tappers, Glover danced his way through musical selections in many moods, leaving no doubt that tap is a form for our times. Improvography II celebrates the back-and-forth play of dancer and musician, opening with Andy McCloud on thrumming bass spotlit in a club-dark space.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Brandon Hammond has a lot in common with his character on "The Gregory Hines Show. " Like Matty Stevenson, the son on Hines' new CBS series, "I'm going through puberty, girls are really appealing, there's school and peer pressure. It's pretty easy to tell what he's feeling," Hammond said. "The Gregory Hines Show," which airs at 9 p.m. Friday on Channel 3, revolves around a widower (Hines) and his son (Hammond). Together they're entering the world of dating. For Hammond, 13, "Gregory Hines" is the latest in a streak of high-profile roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
It's got to be heady stuff for a 15-year-old tapdancer and all-around rough-and-ready adolescent to be referred to in the national press as "the one who's going to take tap into the '90s and the 2000s. " It isn't that Savion Glover, the Newark, N.J., teen-ager currently featured in the Broadway revue "Black and Blue" and the film "Tap" (co-starring Sammy Davis Jr. and Gregory Hines and opening here tomorrow), is unaware of all the fuss. He just plain doesn't have the time to worry about it. Glover attends public school full time, a regimen that requires him to rise early five days a week, take a taxi to New York and catch a train to the East Harlem High School of the Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Tap dance is an intimate art form, creating rhythms that surround the performer and keep the audience following the feet and body in motion. The world premiere of virtuosic tapper Savion Glover's Dance Space at the Academy of Music Saturday night gave us tap-generated percussion for about 45 minutes and visible dance for only about 15 minutes more. But by then an awful lot of audience members had fled, never having gotten to see Glover's feet. The piece, commissioned for the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, opened in shadowy darkness, with fiber-optic stars on the backdrop and on a front scrim that cut the stage in half horizontally.
NEWS
November 17, 2005 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
At first it seems an unusual program for a tap dancer: Vivaldi, Mozart, Dvorak, Bach. But in his latest show, Classical Savion - at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall on Tuesday night - Savion Glover is not just a dancer. He is also a musician, a conductor, a storyteller. Performing classical and jazz music with a nine-piece string chamber-ensemble and four members of a jazz band called The Otherz, Glover makes his instrument of choice tap shoes. He walks onstage for the first piece, Vivaldi's familiar Four Seasons, and immediately begins to interact with the musicians more than the audience.
NEWS
November 11, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Year after year, Danny Glover's name would come up for consideration for the Marian Anderson Award. And year after year, Jonathan Demme, the chairman of the selection panel, would keep his mouth shut. Not only did Demme feel a conflict of interest because he and Glover were close friends - Demme directed the actor in the 1998 film Beloved - but also because he simply thought Glover was too young. The same thing happened this year. "I thought, 'He's still too young,' " Demme said.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
BOJANGLES, 8 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. When you set out to make a movie about the life of famed tap dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, as Showtime did, you're faced with two seemingly insurmountable casting problems. There's finding someone talented enough to play Robinson - and finding a very young actress talented enough to play his most famous cinematic co-star, Shirley Temple. The way "Bojangles," which premieres at 8 Sunday night, deals with these problems is to solve the first head on, casting Gregory Hines, the best possible choice for the lead - and largely avoiding the second.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Tapper and choreographer Savion Glover will perform as part of the opening weekend of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, organizers said Wednesday, bringing a bit of the young and the funk to the second edition of the festival, which opens March 28 and runs through April 27. Jazz pianist and record producer Robert Glasper, Panamanian jazz artist Danilo Pérez and the Panama 500 Band, instrumentalist and composer DJ Dan Deacon, the...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Tap dance is an intimate art form, creating rhythms that surround the performer and keep the audience following the feet and body in motion. The world premiere of virtuosic tapper Savion Glover's Dance Space at the Academy of Music Saturday night gave us tap-generated percussion for about 45 minutes and visible dance for only about 15 minutes more. But by then an awful lot of audience members had fled, never having gotten to see Glover's feet. The piece, commissioned for the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, opened in shadowy darkness, with fiber-optic stars on the backdrop and on a front scrim that cut the stage in half horizontally.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
So much to see and hear. So little time. Or maybe a surfeit of time. That's the promise of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, which begins its second monthlong citywide splash this week - two years after a rousing debut of more than 135 performances and events wrapping up with a street fair on the Avenue of the Arts that drew more than 200,000. This time, the festival, though smaller, returns with a bang, as in the Big Bang of almost 14 billion years ago, although this weekend the oldest moment being evoked is only between three and four billion, when life emerged from the primordial soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Tapper and choreographer Savion Glover will perform as part of the opening weekend of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, organizers said Wednesday, bringing a bit of the young and the funk to the second edition of the festival, which opens March 28 and runs through April 27. Jazz pianist and record producer Robert Glasper, Panamanian jazz artist Danilo Pérez and the Panama 500 Band, instrumentalist and composer DJ Dan Deacon, the...
NEWS
November 17, 2005 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
At first it seems an unusual program for a tap dancer: Vivaldi, Mozart, Dvorak, Bach. But in his latest show, Classical Savion - at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall on Tuesday night - Savion Glover is not just a dancer. He is also a musician, a conductor, a storyteller. Performing classical and jazz music with a nine-piece string chamber-ensemble and four members of a jazz band called The Otherz, Glover makes his instrument of choice tap shoes. He walks onstage for the first piece, Vivaldi's familiar Four Seasons, and immediately begins to interact with the musicians more than the audience.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
Savion Glover doesn't so much take the stage as reign over it. His control is impeccable, his invention boundless, his attack the last word. No wonder the audience at Improvography II leapt to its feet for a standing ovation opening night Tuesday at the Merriam Theater. Joined by his jazz band The Otherz and in the second half by three fellow tappers, Glover danced his way through musical selections in many moods, leaving no doubt that tap is a form for our times. Improvography II celebrates the back-and-forth play of dancer and musician, opening with Andy McCloud on thrumming bass spotlit in a club-dark space.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On this night, the face of bebop wasn't Dizzy Gillespie's puffed-up cheeks or Charlie Parker's elongated jaw. It was Savion Glover's size-12 1/2 feet. With sweat popping off his forehead and the top of his pink shirt drenched to orange, Glover personified jazz in all its frenetic glory Wednesday at Baltimore's Hippodrome Performing Arts Center, his legs driving the rhythm in a way that would make Max Roach proud. If audience reaction is any indication, Improvography II will continue the job that Glover's Tony-winning Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk started in 1996 - squashing the notion that tap dancers are passe shuffle-steppers.
NEWS
November 11, 2002 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Year after year, Danny Glover's name would come up for consideration for the Marian Anderson Award. And year after year, Jonathan Demme, the chairman of the selection panel, would keep his mouth shut. Not only did Demme feel a conflict of interest because he and Glover were close friends - Demme directed the actor in the 1998 film Beloved - but also because he simply thought Glover was too young. The same thing happened this year. "I thought, 'He's still too young,' " Demme said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WHO KNEW Hank Williams Jr. was such a blabbermouth? The rockin' country singer told a concert audience in Dallas that his buddy Kid Rock is set to marry Pamela Anderson next month at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. "I'm gonna be there," bragged Mr. Loose Lips, who has sung with KR before. Hmmm, so let's see: Kid Rock's current concert tour with Aerosmith takes him to Vegas on Nov. 9. Then he has a two-day break before his next date in Tacoma, Wash. Sounds like plenty o' time for a honeymoon to us!
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
BOJANGLES, 8 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. When you set out to make a movie about the life of famed tap dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, as Showtime did, you're faced with two seemingly insurmountable casting problems. There's finding someone talented enough to play Robinson - and finding a very young actress talented enough to play his most famous cinematic co-star, Shirley Temple. The way "Bojangles," which premieres at 8 Sunday night, deals with these problems is to solve the first head on, casting Gregory Hines, the best possible choice for the lead - and largely avoiding the second.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
QUOTE "Sometimes it's Britney Spears and sometimes it's Carrie Fisher. I can't tell if I've got a Lolita complex or an Oedipus complex. " - Ben Affleck commenting to Rosie O'Donnell about all of his alleged flings. Dudley Moore has spoken. The actor was highly irritated at media reports that he was on his deathbed as a result of his rare brain disorder similar to Parkinson's disease. "I suppose my imminent death will sell papers, while my positive and life-affirming work is of no interest to anyone," Moore said in an e-mail titled "Open Letter to the International Press," relayed by his publicist, Michelle Bega.
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