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Scalpers

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NEWS
October 14, 1993 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Armed with $150 in cash - the newspaper's cash - I set out to buy a scalped ticket to last night's playoff game. By game time, I got a fairly good seat for less than that. One of the many lessons I learned is that as game time approaches, the prices go down - but not as much as you might expect. Tickets also become a lot harder to find. I made my first foray around the stadium about 5 p.m., more than three hours before the first pitch. Despite the presence of an army of cops, inspectors from the city Department of Licenses and Inspections and Major League Baseball officials, scalpers were everywhere, including right in front of the Spectrum, across the street.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | By TYREE JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Kevin Nixon appreciates Julius Erving's generosity in providing him with last night's memories. No, the 20-year-old Nixon never went inside the Spectrum to witness the ceremonies to bid the legendary "Dr. J" farewell in his final regular season home basketball game. Nixon was outside selling tickets for Erving's farewell game to fans who came to the sold-out arena without a ticket. Some tickets went for up to $150. "I'm on my way to a grand night," smiled Nixon, who explained that a "grand night" meant at least $1,000 for this particular game.
SPORTS
February 19, 2002 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Keith took another drag on his cigarette, burning it down almost to the filter, and sighed as he exhaled into the cold, crisp Utah air. "It's been a little slow," he said one day last week, frequently interrupting an interview by yelling "Who's selling tickets?" to anyone passing by. "I can't tell why. Maybe it's the cold. There are more people out in the summertime, and that's when you can do some business. But there aren't many people out here. " Keith, who wouldn't give his last name, was one of about three dozen scalpers standing on two corners at the downtown intersection of Main and 200 South Streets, trying to buy tickets and sell them for a profit.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you're hunting for front-row seats to Tuesday's U2 concert, forget it. In a scheme to thwart scalpers, the popular Irish rock band gave all those seats - and all the seats in the fifth row - to area radio stations willing to participate in a special ticket-upgrade promotion. Tickets for two more of the first 10 rows were sold directly to members of the U2 fan club, said a band spokesman. And Ticketmaster put the remaining seats in the first 10 rows up for sale on a delayed basis, so that those a little farther back in line - or unable to get through on the phone right away - had a shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
They swarm like flies around any hot concert or sporting event at the Spectrum and Vet. They snake through the cars clogging Broad Street and hang out at the entrances to the parking lots, often within eye and earshot of traffic cops who'd arrest them if not otherwise occupied. "Hey, who needs tickets?" they yell. "Who's got tickets to sell?" Whatever the market will bear, the scalpers will ask. For a reasonably big show with Phil Collins or Janet Jackson, a $20 or $25 ticket is miraculously transformed into a $50 or $75 seat.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | By Gabriel Escobar and Gina Boubion, Daily News Staff Writers
It was a rock pilgrimage, as thousands flocked from cities along the Eastern Seaboard and into South Philadelphia's JFK Stadium for Amnesty International's global Human Rights Now! concert tour. Some were there for the cause, most for the music and others to make a quick buck. The African People's Socialist Party, based in Philadelphia, competed for attention outside a stadium gate with groups supporting the Irish Republican Army, those advocating an end to apartheid in South Africa and American withdrawal from Central America.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Paul McCartney's sell-out concerts at the Vet tonight and tomorrow may turn out to be one of the last times scalpers will be able to have their way with johnny-come-lately fans. Come Aug. 28, the state's anti-scalping law goes into effect. Concert promoters believe it will severely cut into business for scalpers. For a scalper, a sellout like the McCartney show can be a bonanza. The Electric Factory's Larry Magid, who's promoting the McCartney concert, estimates that a $30 ticket can be scalped for as much as $100 to eager fans.
SPORTS
February 23, 1994 | By Timothy Dwyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
High noon smack in the middle of downtown Olympic town and Ron from London was not happy. Business on the black market was slow. Very slow. "Worst day yet, mate," he said. "Nothing much going on today. Cross- country this morning, but you can't do much with that - can you? - because the police up there are letting people in for free. That doesn't help us, does it?" Each day at 8 a.m., Ron and his two partners take their positions just outside the official Olympic ticket office.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
If you are bent on buying scalped tickets, at least follow these guidelines: Scalpers usually will find you first, but if you can't find tickets, just raise your hand while strolling toward the stadium. Two fingers means you want two tickets. Check the going rate. Ask a couple of scalpers how much they want for various seats. If you're lucky, you may stumble on a fan who just wants to dump some extra tickets and is willing to sell for only a small markup. Don't be afraid to bargain.
NEWS
January 18, 2005
MAYBE YOU CAN answer me this: If L&I staffers are being paid all this overtime during every Eagles game to enforce the laws against scalpers, T-shirt sales, hats, etc. - why is my neighborhood near 13th and Packer loaded with these vendors? As a tax-paying resident of Philadelphia, I say our money is being wasted. Andrew J. Dankanich Philadelphia
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Whitney Houston's secret love Bobby Brown 's sit-down Tuesday with 20/20 yielded many facts about the singer and his life with his wife, the great Whitney Houston . Brown confirmed to Robin Roberts that Houston was romantically involved with childhood friend-turned-creative-director Robin Crawford . There had long been rumors of a relationship between the two. Brown said Houston was attracted to him throughout their 14-year-marriage, but...
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | BY SEAN MURPHY, Associated Press
NORMAN, OKLA. - A concert benefiting Oklahoma tornado victims has drawn some of the biggest names in country music, but with proceeds intended for charity it is not attracting scalpers hoping to prey on an unsuspecting public. Oklahoma natives Toby Keith and Garth Brooks are among the star-studded lineup planned for the Oklahoma Twister Relief Concert, at the University of Oklahoma's Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium tomorrow. Other performers include Trisha Yearwood, Willie Nelson, Sammy Hagar, Ronnie Dunn, Mel Tillis and John Anderson, as well as Carrie Underwood, who will perform via satellite from the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville.
NEWS
October 6, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally and Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Crusty baseball manager and Philly native Lee Elia was right: Playoffs or no, 85 percent of the world has to work instead of going to a daytime ball game. Because of Major League Baseball's schedulers, the other 15 percent are coming out ahead in a sudden buyer's market for Phillies playoff tickets. Sports history notes that Elia used a torrent of salty language in his legendary 1983 rant about the day-game spectators of his Cubs team. And after word came Sunday that the Phillies would launch their world-title-defending playoff run with day games tomorrow and Thursday, Elia-esque expletives echoed through the Phanatic masses.
SPORTS
May 30, 2009 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calm down Being ejected by a 32-year-old fill-in umpire angered Terry Francona so badly that the Boston Red Sox manager had to be examined by emergency medical technicians in Minneapolis after the game for elevated blood pressure. The Boston Herald reported yesterday that Francona, 50, who got the boot from Tim Tichenor, an umpire in the Pacific Coast League, in the seventh inning Thursday night, was venting to his coaches so vociferously after the game that a member of the training staff suggested he get checked out before the team boarded a plane for Toronto.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE DEAD may no longer be Grateful, but they are still generous and the band is looking to reward their fans, help their charities and make some bones with ticket scalpers. Band members announced yesterday that people who want to sit in the up-close-and-personal rows at their concerts can bid for tickets the group held back and is now putting up for auction online. Guitarist Bob Weir says people who bid through charityfolks.com must collect their tickets the day of the show, decreasing the possibility of scalping.
SPORTS
August 10, 2008 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
BEIJING - After all the worries about Beijing's pollution, in the end, withering heat and humidity took a greater toll on Olympic athletes. Yesterday marked the first outdoor endurance competition of the Games - the grueling 152-mile men's cycling road race that started at the historic Temple of Heaven and wound up at the Great Wall. The capital's thick haze from the last few days lifted a bit, allowing sunlight through as riders wound their way through the sweltering 61/2-hour race over the hilly course.
NEWS
June 28, 2008 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Out on the sidewalk, business seemed pathetic. The sold-out Phillies game with the Los Angeles Angels, about to start, caused little obvious ticket buying or selling outside Citizens Bank Park. "I'm Little Joe Moe; if I make $100, I'm happy," said one middle-age guy willing to buy or sell a ticket, but not finding takers. "I'm struggling. " His customers already were inside. The box seats held plenty of newcomers. In the fourth row of Section 116, just behind the Phillies' dugout, Sam Benson of Holland, Bucks County, and three buddies celebrated his ninth birthday.
SPORTS
October 5, 2006 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Intense demand for tickets to the sold-out Eagles-Cowboys game Sunday at Lincoln Financial Field has pushed resale prices of the tickets to the highest of any NFL game this season. "From what we're seeing in the secondary market, this is the most in-demand ticket of the season," said Kenneth Dotson, chief marketing officer at TicketsNow.com, a Web site that lists tickets available from brokers across the country. The average Eagles-Cowboys ticket selling on that Web site has been $401, Dotson said.
NEWS
March 28, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clyde DeLoatch, a 500-pound ticket scalper who was a fixture outside the South Philadelphia sports complex since he was 13, died Saturday from kidney failure. He was 41. Mr. DeLoatch, universally known as Clyde, was too heavy and too sick to stand in his last years, so he would plop down on two, three and finally four milk crates, singing out his favorite chorus, "Who needs tickets?" "I love tickets," Mr. DeLoatch said in an interview a few years ago. "It's why God put me on this Earth.
SPORTS
February 7, 2005 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scalpers were selling, if you knew where to look. The sponsors and vendors were every place you looked. Yesterday, in and around Alltel Stadium, the Super Bowl was American commerce on display, in all its glory. And everyone was buying. At Bay Street and Gator Bowl Boulevard, the final street corner before the stadium area, a few Eagles fans and Patriots fans, and a couple of scalpers who were connoisseurs of old-fashioned free enterprise, had quietly broken off from the crowd and begun negotiating.
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