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Scandal

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NEWS
August 8, 2000 | By David Goldstein and Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Gore will make history today by tapping a Jewish senator, Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut, as his running mate. Democrats hope Lieberman's reputation for moral rectitude - including his condemnation of President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky - will offset Gore's association with scandal. Gore called Lieberman to offer him the vice presidential slot yesterday afternoon, hours after Gore's campaign put out word of the selection. Before ending their call, the Southern Baptist vice president and the Orthodox Jewish senator prayed together.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
I'M SORRY TO hear that Cardinal Bevilacqua is sick, but I have no sympathy for him. He wasn't sick when the priest sexual-abuse scandal broke. He wasn't sick when the attorneys the diocese hired played hardball with the victims and their families. He wasn't sick when the coverups were going on. He wants to claim that the grand jury is disrespecting him, but what about the victims and their families who were disrespected by diocesan attorneys, and who were lied to - what about them?
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Three more Secret Service employees have been forced out of the government, bringing to nine the number of people who have lost their jobs in the prostitution scandal roiling the agency. Two employees have resigned and a third is having his national-security clearance revoked, the Secret Service said Tuesday. The employee whose clearance is being revoked can appeal the decision. Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said one of the resigning agents stayed at the Hilton Hotel in Cartagena, Colombia, where Obama stayed for the Summit of Americas.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
So what are we to call this emerging scandal? How about "Iranamok"? Or "Contradeceptive"? Or maybe "the Swiss Connection"? While Washington goes about the serious business of sorting out who did what and who knew what in the matter of U.S. arms sales to Iran, through Israel, with some of the payments diverted to Nicaraguan rebels, known as contras, by way of a Swiss bank account, a lot of less-serious folks are struggling to come up with...
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's phone-hacking scandal intensified yesterday as the scope of tabloid intrusion into private voice mails became clearer: Murder victims. Terror victims. Film stars. Sports figures. Politicians. The royal family's entourage. Almost no one, it seems, was safe from a tabloid determined to beat its rivals, whatever it took. The focal point is the News of the World - now facing a spreading advertising boycott - and the top executives of its parent companies: Rebekah Brooks, former News of the World editor who is now chief executive of News International, and her boss, media potentate Rupert Murdoch.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yup, they're all here, indelibly etched in black and white, quaint artifacts pulled from a time capsule, images plucked from an bygone era of bushy sideburns, rotary phones, bell-bottom jeans, electric typewriters, and smoke-choked rooms. Start with Richard Nixon, the star of this Smithsonian Institution photo exhibit, the President who announced 25 years ago tonight that he was resigning his office. He's up there on the museum wall in all his fading glory - scowling, pacing, cajoling, stalking along a rainswept beach with bodyguards.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
There was an almost audible sigh of relief from Republicans last week when President Reagan came down from his California mountaintop and, as he phrased it, put "the machinery in place" to "restore complete confidence" in his shaken administration. Party leaders interviewed around the country expressed fervent hope that the worst of the Iran arms-sale crisis was past - a hope mixed with an uneasy uncertainty that such is really the case. As if in a chorus, almost all of them said "it's too early to tell" what the long-term impact of the crisis will be on the party or the 1988 presidential election.
SPORTS
November 15, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The U.S. Olympic Committee directed more than $60,000 to support sports in Africa and the Mideast in hopes of currying favor for Salt Lake City's bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, yesterday's Los Angeles Times reported. The newspaper said it obtained an internal USOC report which revealed that the USOC underwrote training costs and supplies for athletes and coaches from Sudan, Mali, Uganda and Turkey to help Salt Lake City win the 2002 Games. The USOC spent thousands of dollars on equipment such as basketballs and even gave out "pocket money" - $150 a month to each of three Sudanese athletes and a coach for four months in 1995, according to the report, which was said to give the most detailed account to date of the USOC's role in the worst corruption scandal in the history of the Olympic movement.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | By Jeffrey K. Hadden and Anson Shupe
It is difficult to imagine how anything good could come out of the scandals that have rocked religious broadcasting in recent weeks. In the shadow of all the fun humorists and skeptical columnists have had at the expense of some of the stars of the electric church, the woes of religious broadcasters are no laughing matter. Three national public opinion polls conducted last week point to anger and disillusionment with the video vicarage. Those televangelists most directly involved are most badly damaged.
NEWS
July 13, 2004 | By William Safire
All our July chin-pulling about polls and veeps and CIA missteps has little to do with November's election, which will be decided by unforeseeable events. Instead, let's counter-program, to examine a political corruption story beginning to gain traction that will reach warp speed in hearings and headlines next spring. At least eight official investigations have begun into the largest financial rip-off in history: preliminary estimates from the GAO point to $10 billion skimmed or kicked back or otherwise stolen in the United Nations dealings with Saddam Hussein.
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NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last month, Joshua Mensah shared a meal with some of his soon-to-be Cornell University classmates from the Philadelphia area. The annual freshman send-off, at a Drexel Hill country club, focused on his new school. But Mensah found himself defending his old school district in Chester County: A parent said she had heard bad things about Coatesville. Mensah knew all too well what she meant. A year ago, hundreds of pages of racist and sexist text messages between Coatesville's superintendent and athletic director came to light.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
WE ALL know how Washington crises usually unfold. A problem erupts. Politicians trample each other to express outrage and allocate blame. Scapegoats are sacrificed, legislation emerges and money gets appropriated. And then the issue fades from view. That's the course the scandal over veterans' health care has followed so far. A few weeks ago, everyone in the capital was in a fit over revelations that veterans were suffering and even dying while waiting weeks or months for appointments.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Imagine if coworkers allegedly violated rules again and again, not over a year, but sometimes for more than a decade. Imagine if they allegedly committed acts of violence, and stole money and drugs, and their reckless behavior resulted in $500,000 in settlement payouts. And imagine if these employees were never fired or appropriately disciplined and, in some cases, collected substantial overtime and commendations. What sort of business would tolerate such behavior? Welcome to the Philadelphia Police Department.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fallout from a cheating scandal in the Philadelphia School District continues. Three retired teachers surrendered their professional credentials last month for allegedly engaging in "multiple PSSA testing violations" related to Pennsylvania's system of standardized tests, according to the state Department of Education. Information posted on the department's website Wednesday identified the three as Alene S. Goldstein, Deborah L. Edwards-Dillard, and Phyllis R. Patselas. All three agreed to never seek jobs at a public school, charter school, or cyber school, or with a contracted educational provider.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The letter came last month, alerting Mike Pearson that his mother's benefits request had arrived and would be handled with urgency. But, the Department of Veterans Affairs warned, there could be delays. Pearson already knew that. He filed the claim two years earlier. "It's just as if any document I send goes into a black hole," he said. Weeks after the disclosure that 68 bins of old mail from veterans had been found at the Philadelphia office - and after VA officials pledged immediate action - it has become clear that its problems surrounding document management run deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* THE DIVIDE. 9 tonight, WE tv.   BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - Tony Goldwyn is probably used to being taken seriously. The 54-year-old grandson of Hollywood mogul Samuel Goldwyn isn't only an actor: He's long been a mover and shaker behind the scenes. But playing the president of the United States on ABC's "Scandal" may have added a layer of authority. "I'm not totally sure. I think having been a director and a producer helped me be the president, because you have to take charge," said Goldwyn in an interview last week during the Television Critics Association's summer meetings.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Six months after e-mails surfaced tying lane closures at the George Washington Bridge to a senior aide to Gov. Christie, Democratic legislators continue to scrutinize the role of the governor's office, even as Christie tries to rebuild his political brand. While much of the Legislature breaks for the summer, the joint investigatory committee plans to hear from more witnesses, including Christie's incoming chief of staff. The panel has held five hearings since January, taking testimony from some of Christie's top aides, and plans another one later this month and likely several more through the summer.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The legislative panel probing the lane closures at the George Washington Bridge announced Wednesday that it had subpoenaed Gov. Christie's chief of staff to testify on Monday. Kevin O'Dowd "is in a unique position to provide insight into what happened under his watch as chief of staff to the governor," the committee co-chairs, Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg (D., Bergen) and Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski (D., Middlesex), said in a statement. O'Dowd, whom Christie nominated in December to serve as attorney general, told the governor's lawyers that he had no role in the September lane closures.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four Philadelphia educators who were arrested and charged in connection with a cheating scandal have been suspended without pay, a School District spokeswoman said Friday. Evelyn Cortez, Rita Wyszynski, Jennifer Hughes, and Ary Sloane face criminal charges of conspiracy, tampering with public records, forgery, and related crimes. Cortez was principal of Cayuga Elementary, and Wyszynski and Hughes were teachers there. Sloane, a former Cayuga teacher, had most recently been principal of Bethune Elementary in the district.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
ANSWER: Shonday. Question: What comes after Wednesday on ABC this fall? Shonda Rhimes, the producer of ABC's addictive soaps "Grey's Anatomy" and "Scandal," will finish her conquest of ABC's Thursday nights when those dramas move an hour earlier to make way for the newest Shondaland production, the legal thriller "How to Get Away with Murder," at 10. Written by Peter Nowalk, who's worked for Rhimes and producing partner Betsy Beers on...
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