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Scandal

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NEWS
August 8, 2000 | By David Goldstein and Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Gore will make history today by tapping a Jewish senator, Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut, as his running mate. Democrats hope Lieberman's reputation for moral rectitude - including his condemnation of President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky - will offset Gore's association with scandal. Gore called Lieberman to offer him the vice presidential slot yesterday afternoon, hours after Gore's campaign put out word of the selection. Before ending their call, the Southern Baptist vice president and the Orthodox Jewish senator prayed together.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
I'M SORRY TO hear that Cardinal Bevilacqua is sick, but I have no sympathy for him. He wasn't sick when the priest sexual-abuse scandal broke. He wasn't sick when the attorneys the diocese hired played hardball with the victims and their families. He wasn't sick when the coverups were going on. He wants to claim that the grand jury is disrespecting him, but what about the victims and their families who were disrespected by diocesan attorneys, and who were lied to - what about them?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER . 10 p.m. Thursdays, 6ABC. *  SCANDAL . 9 p.m. Thursdays, 6ABC. (Spoiler alert: This interview includes discussions of a major plot point from last week's premiere of "How to Get Away with Murder. ") HAVERTOWN'S Tom Verica is busier than you might think. The actor, whose face was revealed at the very end of the pilot for ABC's "How to Get Away with Murder" to be that of the corpse wrapped in a rug, wasn't just lying around: He was moonlighting.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Three more Secret Service employees have been forced out of the government, bringing to nine the number of people who have lost their jobs in the prostitution scandal roiling the agency. Two employees have resigned and a third is having his national-security clearance revoked, the Secret Service said Tuesday. The employee whose clearance is being revoked can appeal the decision. Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said one of the resigning agents stayed at the Hilton Hotel in Cartagena, Colombia, where Obama stayed for the Summit of Americas.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
So what are we to call this emerging scandal? How about "Iranamok"? Or "Contradeceptive"? Or maybe "the Swiss Connection"? While Washington goes about the serious business of sorting out who did what and who knew what in the matter of U.S. arms sales to Iran, through Israel, with some of the payments diverted to Nicaraguan rebels, known as contras, by way of a Swiss bank account, a lot of less-serious folks are struggling to come up with...
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's phone-hacking scandal intensified yesterday as the scope of tabloid intrusion into private voice mails became clearer: Murder victims. Terror victims. Film stars. Sports figures. Politicians. The royal family's entourage. Almost no one, it seems, was safe from a tabloid determined to beat its rivals, whatever it took. The focal point is the News of the World - now facing a spreading advertising boycott - and the top executives of its parent companies: Rebekah Brooks, former News of the World editor who is now chief executive of News International, and her boss, media potentate Rupert Murdoch.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yup, they're all here, indelibly etched in black and white, quaint artifacts pulled from a time capsule, images plucked from an bygone era of bushy sideburns, rotary phones, bell-bottom jeans, electric typewriters, and smoke-choked rooms. Start with Richard Nixon, the star of this Smithsonian Institution photo exhibit, the President who announced 25 years ago tonight that he was resigning his office. He's up there on the museum wall in all his fading glory - scowling, pacing, cajoling, stalking along a rainswept beach with bodyguards.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
There was an almost audible sigh of relief from Republicans last week when President Reagan came down from his California mountaintop and, as he phrased it, put "the machinery in place" to "restore complete confidence" in his shaken administration. Party leaders interviewed around the country expressed fervent hope that the worst of the Iran arms-sale crisis was past - a hope mixed with an uneasy uncertainty that such is really the case. As if in a chorus, almost all of them said "it's too early to tell" what the long-term impact of the crisis will be on the party or the 1988 presidential election.
SPORTS
November 15, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The U.S. Olympic Committee directed more than $60,000 to support sports in Africa and the Mideast in hopes of currying favor for Salt Lake City's bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, yesterday's Los Angeles Times reported. The newspaper said it obtained an internal USOC report which revealed that the USOC underwrote training costs and supplies for athletes and coaches from Sudan, Mali, Uganda and Turkey to help Salt Lake City win the 2002 Games. The USOC spent thousands of dollars on equipment such as basketballs and even gave out "pocket money" - $150 a month to each of three Sudanese athletes and a coach for four months in 1995, according to the report, which was said to give the most detailed account to date of the USOC's role in the worst corruption scandal in the history of the Olympic movement.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | By Jeffrey K. Hadden and Anson Shupe
It is difficult to imagine how anything good could come out of the scandals that have rocked religious broadcasting in recent weeks. In the shadow of all the fun humorists and skeptical columnists have had at the expense of some of the stars of the electric church, the woes of religious broadcasters are no laughing matter. Three national public opinion polls conducted last week point to anger and disillusionment with the video vicarage. Those televangelists most directly involved are most badly damaged.
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NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former homicide detective charged with covering up a slaying allegedly committed by his girlfriend has been released on bail, according to court documents. Ron Dove surrendered to police Thursday morning and was later charged with hindering apprehension, conspiracy, and related crimes. He was arraigned later that day and released after posting $25,000 bail. Dove, a 16-year veteran of the force when he was fired in November 2013, is accused of helping his girlfriend, Erica Sanchez, flee the state after she allegedly fatally stabbed her estranged lover, Cesar Vera.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey Republican Party owes about $480,000 in debt related to the George Washington Bridge scandal, even as Gov. Christie travels the country on its tab and the GOP readies for state Assembly elections in November. The party has about $550,000 in cash in its state account, according to disclosure records filed with the Election Law Enforcement Commission made public Tuesday. It owes $50,000 for various expenses. In a recent filing for its federal account, the party listed $295,000 cash on hand and $107,000 in debt unrelated to the bridge scandal.
SPORTS
January 21, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
I USED TO THINK that all the talk about the New England Patriots and head coach Bill Belichick being cheaters was just sour grapes. When you lose playoff games and Super Bowls to a team that is as close to an NFL dynasty as there has been in the last 2 decades, there is bound to be talk of improprieties. Of course, the fact that Belichick was fined $500,000 by the NFL for his role in the Patriots spying on, and videotaping of, the New York Jets in 2007 tends to lend credence to charges of underhanded shenanigans.
SPORTS
January 18, 2015 | BY JOHN McGONIGAL, For the Daily News
STATE COLLEGE - A college student, with earbuds in and a backpack thrown over one shoulder, walked by Cafe 210 West - a Penn State bar - and smiled. "Cafe," as it's affectionately known, had changed its outside sign from "Cafe 210 West" to "Cafe 409 West. " The number 409 has a deep meaning in Happy Valley; it's the number of wins late former football coach Joe Paterno earned before the NCAA vacated 112 victories (111 of them Paterno's) from 1998 through 2011 as part of the sanctions that resulted from the Jerry Sandusky child-sex abuse scandal.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As Gov. Christie's reelection campaign continues to respond to federal subpoenas in relation to the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, it has racked up more than three-quarters of a million dollars in debt. Under New Jersey law, the campaign may not have to repay all of it. The Christie campaign owed more than $500,000 to the law firm Patton Boggs, which is handling its responses to subpoenas, as of its most recent filing with the state on Oct. 14. The campaign also owed $260,000 to New York-based Stroz Friedberg L.L.C., a digital forensics and data-recovery firm.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ANOTHER FORMER Philadelphia principal has been snared in an investigation into wide-spreading cheating on standardized tests. Lolamarie Davis-O'Rourke, 43, of Williamstown, N.J., was arrested yesterday for allegedly tampering with the tests while she was principal of Locke Elementary School in West Philadelphia from 2009 to 2012, Attorney General Kathleen Kane announced yesterday. Davis-O'Rourke is the fourth principal and eighth educator overall to be arrested in connection with the probe.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The incompetence of the Coatesville school board rivaled that of those it empowered to run Chester County's poorest school district. A grand jury report suggests that the board allowed former Superintendent Richard Como to run the district as a petty dictatorship, bullying employees who would dare question him as he allegedly stole public funds and hired unqualified relatives, friends, and felons to work with children. Several of Como's hires had a record of drug, weapons, assault, and child endangerment offenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News
TALK ABOUT blurring the lines between real life and reel life. Sony Pictures, which is having a Month From Hell for the ages, has enlisted the help of the spin-mistress who was the inspiration for the ABC prime-time soaper "Scandal. " The company that produced (and won't release) "The Interview" has asked Judy Smith to help with damage control in the wake of the cyberattack it suffered (apparently at the hands of North Korea), and its subsequent decision to keep the Seth Rogen - James Franco comedy about killing North Korean Big Cheese Kim Jong Un from public display.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
DAN STERLING , "the guy that brought down Sony," is from West Philadelphia. So wrote 24/7 Molly Eichel on philly.com yesterday. Sterling, you see, is the fella who wrote "The Interview," the film at the center of the Sony hacking scandal. The movie, which now may never be seen, stars James Franco and Seth Rogen as TV journalists tasked with assassinating North Korean leader Kim Jong-un . Sony canceled the theatrical release after hacker group Guardians of Peace threatened an attack on theaters screening the film.
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