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Scandal

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NEWS
August 8, 2000 | By David Goldstein and Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Gore will make history today by tapping a Jewish senator, Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut, as his running mate. Democrats hope Lieberman's reputation for moral rectitude - including his condemnation of President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky - will offset Gore's association with scandal. Gore called Lieberman to offer him the vice presidential slot yesterday afternoon, hours after Gore's campaign put out word of the selection. Before ending their call, the Southern Baptist vice president and the Orthodox Jewish senator prayed together.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER . 10 p.m. Thursdays, 6ABC. *  SCANDAL . 9 p.m. Thursdays, 6ABC. (Spoiler alert: This interview includes discussions of a major plot point from last week's premiere of "How to Get Away with Murder. ") HAVERTOWN'S Tom Verica is busier than you might think. The actor, whose face was revealed at the very end of the pilot for ABC's "How to Get Away with Murder" to be that of the corpse wrapped in a rug, wasn't just lying around: He was moonlighting.
NEWS
July 13, 2004
I'M SORRY TO hear that Cardinal Bevilacqua is sick, but I have no sympathy for him. He wasn't sick when the priest sexual-abuse scandal broke. He wasn't sick when the attorneys the diocese hired played hardball with the victims and their families. He wasn't sick when the coverups were going on. He wants to claim that the grand jury is disrespecting him, but what about the victims and their families who were disrespected by diocesan attorneys, and who were lied to - what about them?
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Three more Secret Service employees have been forced out of the government, bringing to nine the number of people who have lost their jobs in the prostitution scandal roiling the agency. Two employees have resigned and a third is having his national-security clearance revoked, the Secret Service said Tuesday. The employee whose clearance is being revoked can appeal the decision. Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said one of the resigning agents stayed at the Hilton Hotel in Cartagena, Colombia, where Obama stayed for the Summit of Americas.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
So what are we to call this emerging scandal? How about "Iranamok"? Or "Contradeceptive"? Or maybe "the Swiss Connection"? While Washington goes about the serious business of sorting out who did what and who knew what in the matter of U.S. arms sales to Iran, through Israel, with some of the payments diverted to Nicaraguan rebels, known as contras, by way of a Swiss bank account, a lot of less-serious folks are struggling to come up with...
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's phone-hacking scandal intensified yesterday as the scope of tabloid intrusion into private voice mails became clearer: Murder victims. Terror victims. Film stars. Sports figures. Politicians. The royal family's entourage. Almost no one, it seems, was safe from a tabloid determined to beat its rivals, whatever it took. The focal point is the News of the World - now facing a spreading advertising boycott - and the top executives of its parent companies: Rebekah Brooks, former News of the World editor who is now chief executive of News International, and her boss, media potentate Rupert Murdoch.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yup, they're all here, indelibly etched in black and white, quaint artifacts pulled from a time capsule, images plucked from an bygone era of bushy sideburns, rotary phones, bell-bottom jeans, electric typewriters, and smoke-choked rooms. Start with Richard Nixon, the star of this Smithsonian Institution photo exhibit, the President who announced 25 years ago tonight that he was resigning his office. He's up there on the museum wall in all his fading glory - scowling, pacing, cajoling, stalking along a rainswept beach with bodyguards.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
There was an almost audible sigh of relief from Republicans last week when President Reagan came down from his California mountaintop and, as he phrased it, put "the machinery in place" to "restore complete confidence" in his shaken administration. Party leaders interviewed around the country expressed fervent hope that the worst of the Iran arms-sale crisis was past - a hope mixed with an uneasy uncertainty that such is really the case. As if in a chorus, almost all of them said "it's too early to tell" what the long-term impact of the crisis will be on the party or the 1988 presidential election.
SPORTS
November 15, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The U.S. Olympic Committee directed more than $60,000 to support sports in Africa and the Mideast in hopes of currying favor for Salt Lake City's bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, yesterday's Los Angeles Times reported. The newspaper said it obtained an internal USOC report which revealed that the USOC underwrote training costs and supplies for athletes and coaches from Sudan, Mali, Uganda and Turkey to help Salt Lake City win the 2002 Games. The USOC spent thousands of dollars on equipment such as basketballs and even gave out "pocket money" - $150 a month to each of three Sudanese athletes and a coach for four months in 1995, according to the report, which was said to give the most detailed account to date of the USOC's role in the worst corruption scandal in the history of the Olympic movement.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | By Jeffrey K. Hadden and Anson Shupe
It is difficult to imagine how anything good could come out of the scandals that have rocked religious broadcasting in recent weeks. In the shadow of all the fun humorists and skeptical columnists have had at the expense of some of the stars of the electric church, the woes of religious broadcasters are no laughing matter. Three national public opinion polls conducted last week point to anger and disillusionment with the video vicarage. Those televangelists most directly involved are most badly damaged.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - Mitchell Rubin, the onetime chairman of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, pleaded guilty Thursday to commercial bribery and will serve no jail time for his role in the pay-to-play scheme involving the agency. Rubin appeared in Dauphin County Court to enter a plea to one count of commercial bribery, a misdemeanor charge that carries a maximum penalty of two years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Under the terms of the plea deal with the state Attorney General's Office, Rubin will receive 24 months of probation, serve 100 hours of community service, and pay a $2,500 fine.
NEWS
November 10, 2014
VETERANS DAY: It's not the holiday where we honor the sacrifices of our military men and women, but the day we mark yet another year of our shabby treatment of them. Last year, for example, we marked the holiday by a report that found 22 veterans commit suicide every single day. This year's annual Veterans Health Administration scandal is also stomach turning: a report in May that at least 40 patients had died waiting for care at a VA hospital in Phoenix, Ariz. The revelations of serious backlogs and secret waiting lists led to the eventual resignation of Eric Shinseki, the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
IT APPEARS more heads will roll - maybe already have - in the porn scandal that has consumed our state government. Renee George Martin, a spokeswoman for state Attorney General Kathleen Kane, yesterday confirmed that her office's human resources department is wrapping up an investigation into at least 30 current employees who used state computers or email accounts to send or receive pornography. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review yesterday reported that "six or more" employees have been fired or offered early retirement.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
FOR A LITTLE over 3 decades, Mike Pettine was Central Bucks West football. It was a legacy of unparalleled excellence. That can never be erased. But yesterday's news that the Bucks' 2014 season was being canceled with two games left due to an alleged hazing scandal will assuredly have a widespread impact. And it won't be positive. Nobody understands that more than Pettine, whose son Mike Jr., a West quarterback in the early 1980s, is the first-year head coach of the Cleveland Browns.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Doug Wright's over-the-top play is being given an over-the-top production by Luna Theater Company. Quills is about the over-the-top Marquis de Sade, who lent his name to sadism, sexual pleasure derived from inflicting pain, and who wrote novels of shocking, violent pornography. Excess is the name of the game here: sexually, literarily, and theatrically. As Wright explains in his notes on style, "Characters are not good or bad; they are either kissed by God or yoked in Satan's merciless employ.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a profession that burnishes an image of dispassion and decorum, what's happening with the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is like a food fight at a very public banquet. Lawyers, academics, and bar association officials sit dumbstruck, embarrassed to watch, afraid to look away, even more afraid of what might be coming next. "My hope is that I never have to hear one more word about this again, but I'm afraid that I'm going to," said Richard B. Klein, a retired judge of 36 years, 28 years on Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, eight on Superior Court.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAYREVILLE, N.J. - In front of a crowd that demanded answers and, at times, slammed district officials for their handling of a high school football hazing scandal, the Sayreville Board of Education voted Tuesday night to approve the suspension of football coach George Najjar and four others. The decision came amid an outpouring of support for Najjar and criticism of the board by a volunteer coach, who said the board had "failed. " The other district employees suspended with pay are Edward Mish, Michael Novak, Mark Poore, and Timothy Ballard, all assistant football coaches.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAYREVILLE, N.J. - The dream of becoming a Bomber on this town's beloved high school football team begins across the street from the stadium floodlights, down the hill on the playing field tucked behind a lake. The Mighty Mites squad of 8- and 9-year-olds pad up in black jerseys, team name on front, last name and number on back. They run tackle and speed drills for two hours three days a week. When coaches speak, the players huddle and take a knee. They are still just children, and don't fully comprehend why the high school football team - the players they idolize - no longer storm the field on Friday nights.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A divided Pennsylvania Supreme Court is expected early this week to decide what to do about one of its justices caught up in the scandal over pornographic e-mails sent among state employees. But what action the court may take against Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, who has acknowledged sending sexually explicit messages from a personal account, remains very much an open question amid intense last-minute lobbying, sources close to the court said. Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille has urged his colleagues to handle the matter swiftly and decisively by suspending McCaffery from his judicial duties and appointing a special master to investigate the matter.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Riding the escalator in Philadelphia's new Family Court after last week's ribbon-cutting ceremony, I overheard a woman remark that the building didn't turn out as bad as she expected, given the grubby scandal that accompanied its creation. I concur. Sure, Philadelphia's first new courthouse in a generation is a dispiriting example of bland, office-park architecture plunked in the civic heart of the city. The exterior has all the charm of a cardboard box - and the proportions to match.
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