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NEWS
September 26, 2005 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Nobody expects film director Peter Jackson to mount a stage production of Lord of the Rings any time soon. Pop stars, however, are obligated to repeatedly re-create - in real time - music they spent months tweaking to perfection in the studio. Take Annie's full-length debut, Anniemal, a sugary album of bouncy, if thoughtful, dance-pop that has made the 26-year-old Norwegian singer a cult sensation. Its elaborate, multilayered Eurodisco productions seem hardly suited for live performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
A remarkable show of decorative art from Finland is on view at the Hagley Museum. "Art by Design: Reflections of Finland" offers a good chance to see a strong 12-artist show of about 50 textiles, ceramics, glass and pieces of wood featuring sculpture and functional items. The traveling display was organized by Katonah Gallery of Westchester County, N.Y., in collaboration with the Finnish Society of Crafts and Design, to mark the U.S. National Year of Friendship With Finland. Certainly as hunters of Finnish design's big game, this show's organizers have done uncommonly well.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
AMC's The Killing , returning for its second season on April 1, has been called one of TV's most original murder mysteries. Its intricate story structure is unique, following a single murder case - the abduction and murder of high school student Rosie Larsen - over two 13-episode seasons. Its hero is one of a kind, an obsessive, monomaniacal, lone-wolf detective. But it isn't original at all: The Killing is a remake, a copy, of the Danish mystery Forbrydelsen (literally, "the crime")
NEWS
October 2, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kurt Wallander slouches back to American TV Sunday, looking like he hasn't slept - and may never sleep again. For the next three Sundays at 9 p.m., Masterpiece Mystery! will show "Wallander II," three new installments of the adventures of the rumpled, agonized police detective based in Ystad, Sweden. In the first, "Faceless Killers," Wallander faces greed, racism and revenge. For starters. Kenneth Branagh - who also is one of the executive producers - returns in his Emmy-nominated, British Academy of Film and Television Arts Award-winning role as Wallander, from the celebrated novels by Swedish master Henning Mankell.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | By James R. Carroll, Special to The Inquirer
Iceland is not the first place most people think of when they start contemplating a vacation. Or the second. Or even the third. Too bad. It is about as different and unusual a place as you could hope for and still be in the civilized world. The always cool summer air is pristine. It has the smell of wilderness about it, even in downtown Reykjavik. A 20-minute drive out of the capital takes you into more than just wide-open spaces. The two-lane roads traverse primeval volcanic and mountainous landscapes where there is not a single house or car or service station or, most of the time, even a single tree.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dead heat, down to the wire. Once again, the European Union is living on the edge. Today, the 12-member alliance of Western European states will try to take a big step toward fulfilling its grand ambition to conquer the continent by democratic means. Sweden, the most pivotal Scandinavian nation, will decide in a referendum whether to be part of a unified Europe. A thumbs-up vote would make it easier for its nervous Nordic neighbors, Finland and Norway, to follow suit. Along with Austria, which voted to join the EU last spring, the Scandinavian countries would increase the roster to 16. And it would pave the way for the most ambitious expansion of all: pulling in the nascent democracies of central and Eastern Europe, binding them to a peaceful future with the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010
By Walter Mosley Riverhead. 326 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Dan DeLuca Walter Mosley has left Easy Rawlins in the past in Los Angeles and moved east to modern-day New York with Leonid Trotter McGill. "LT" is a trained-boxer private dick with a criminal past and a jaundiced eye. He's a middle-aged, African American, contemporary Chandleresque tough guy with a Thou shalt not kill but may happily beat thine adversary to a pulp moral code. He's a short, stocky, balding, guilt-ridden, hot-tempered detective with a soft heart who is locked in a loveless marriage with a cold Scandinavian beauty even more disloyal than he is, and he's raising three children, only one of them his own. A trusted fixer for powerful Manhattan elites and sworn enemy to many a member of law enforcement, the well-read son of a Communist father who renamed himself Tolstoy, McGill between occupies a dubiously obtained office suite in a gleaming Manhattan skyscraper.
NEWS
October 13, 2006 | By Robert Lima
Friday the 13th! What's in that day and number combination that rattles our self-confidence or, at the very least, makes us ponder the possibility that the commonplace might become horrific? Why has that date been viewed traditionally with such apprehension? Friday gets its name either from Frig (Frigga), Odin's consort and goddess of heaven, or from another Scandinavian deity, Frey(e), associated with fertility and love. But it isn't necessarily from its pagan associations that Friday derives its negative aspect in our culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2005 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Mike Brenner, lap-steel player extraordinaire, is the not-so-secret weapon when he sits in with Marah, Magnolia Electric Company, or John Train. But when he puts on his white Col. Sanders suit, he steps into the spotlight as Slo-Mo, leader of Philly's best, and only, funky hip-hop steel-guitar band. On the new My Buzz Comes Back, the second Slo-Mo album, Brenner teams with local rapper Mic Wrecka (Doug Jenkins) for a set that balances hip-hop beats, swampy steel-guitar grooves, Brenner's sing-song vocals, Wrecka's raps, and Nancy Falkow's catchy "mega-choruses" (as Brenner calls them)
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | By Patricia Gallo-Stenman, Special to The Inquirer
Do hotels float? They sure do, every day between Finland and Sweden. Plush is the word for most of these giant cruise ships - don't dare call them ferries - that ply the Baltic Sea between Helsinki and Stockholm, day in and day out, the year-round. The overnight mini-cruise is a popular trip for tourists, because these vessels are really deluxe cruise ships, built by Finland's renowned Wartsila Shipyard, with the finest of amenities. The impressive, marble-lined lobby of the Viking Line's Olympia, for example, boasts a huge crystal chandelier that weighs in the tons.
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