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NEWS
March 25, 2001 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
It's time to have a talk about these dirt-cheap fares that make it possible to fly somewhere far away, over a long weekend, at the last minute. They look really good. They don't always work. We've read and heard many travelers' tales about my-wonderful-weekend-anyplace-but-here. That's fine if everything goes according to the itinerary. But the weather works against us. So do crowded skies. And so does that great grab-bag of hassles the airlines deliver with an all-purpose phrase: Equipment problems.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
Forget 'heritage,' just cut the hair! Once again, the archdiocese of Philadelphia has reared its hypocritical head. They now say it is OK to wear "faddish" hairstyles. I went through 12 years of this hypocrisy. My hair was not allowed to pass my collar but because the three children at St. Rose of Lima claim it's "part of our heritage," now it's OK. According to my "heritage," our men wore the hair long to protect their necks from the cold Scandinavian winters and blustery North Sea winds!
SPORTS
August 7, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
As an infantryman in Vietnam for a year, Ed Dougherty said he was a target. Only 45 of the 113 men in his unit returned home. He was one of them, though not unscathed: He earned a Purple Heart - along with two Bronze Stars - for combat injuries. "I'm lucky. Those other guys weren't," the Linwood, Pa., resident said yesterday. "I got home and got a chance to live my dream. " The dream was to play professional golf. Yesterday, that dream grew even sweeter with his first victory on the Senior PGA Tour in the $1.6 million Coldwell Banker Burnet Classic at Coon Rapids, Minn.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bjarne E. Pettersen, 73, a retired baker who aided thousands of Norwegian and Swedish sailors in Philadelphia over more than 40 years, died of cancer Saturday at his home in Lansdowne. A native of Hvaler Island, Norway, Mr. Pettersen came to the United States in 1951 and was a member and leader at the Norwegian Seamen's Mission in Philadelphia. He arranged bus tours to other cities, shopping sprees, picnics, and entertainment and published a newsletter for Norwegian and Swedish seamen, said his wife of six years, Betty F. Engh Pettersen.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1996 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT HAMRICK
Out of hundreds of malls in the United States, Willow Grove Park was the choice of 23 Scandinavian marketing executives to visit. Yesterday they heard Lynda Benedetto talk about the mall's operating practices and successes, including its Malls to Zoo fund-raising event.
LIVING
April 26, 1996 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's nothing pastel about Louise Manzione. Dark-haired and dark-eyed, she favors vivid lipstick and lean-lined black clothing set off with single, striking pieces of jewelry. Manzione's kitchen and breakfast room - the heart of her family's life - are equally dramatic, with bold walnut arches and columns, hefty handmade tiles, elaborate spigots at the sink, one-of-a-kind drawer pulls, creamy wallpaper with deep green and burgundy stripes, and antiqued cabinets. The atmosphere is rich, detailed and earthy.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dead heat, down to the wire. Once again, the European Union is living on the edge. Today, the 12-member alliance of Western European states will try to take a big step toward fulfilling its grand ambition to conquer the continent by democratic means. Sweden, the most pivotal Scandinavian nation, will decide in a referendum whether to be part of a unified Europe. A thumbs-up vote would make it easier for its nervous Nordic neighbors, Finland and Norway, to follow suit. Along with Austria, which voted to join the EU last spring, the Scandinavian countries would increase the roster to 16. And it would pave the way for the most ambitious expansion of all: pulling in the nascent democracies of central and Eastern Europe, binding them to a peaceful future with the West.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Once upon a time there was the bedtime story. Parents would read it with their eyes darting from page to dozing progeny. Its purpose was to lower heavy eyelids, to lull children to sleep with happily-ever-after endings. Teddy's Day isn't a bedtime story. Its ruby reds, royal blues and sunshine yellows keep eyes wide and wondering. Its quilted cloth pages encourage hands to pull and pat rather than turn the pages. The book is a give-away for new members of Baby's First Book Club, which ships 25 titles a month from its Bristol Township office.
SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Swedes don't samba. Swedish soccer fans don't try to carry large bass drums onto airplanes like their Brazilian counterparts, either. In Sweden, soccer is a very nice pastime, but it is neither religion nor cause for an overthrow of the government. When Sweden and Brazil meet in the World Cup semifinals at the Rose Bowl today, both sets of fans will be wearing yellow and blue. But don't look for the Swedish contingent to display large foam fingers declaring, "We're number one. " An enterprising concessionaire might be better off with signs that read, "Well, it could be that we're not too bad, if you insist.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
We aren't the only country where people have thin skins and political correctness is on the rise. To my surprise, the same symptoms are being shown in Scandinavian countries, which have long been known for their tolerant attitudes. But recently, the Norwegian courts had a racial hatred court case, which is unusual for that country, since almost everybody in Norway is a Norwegian and looks like it, so it is difficult to find someone of another race to hate. However, this case involved Swedes, who pretty much look like Norwegians, although you would never want to tell a Norwegian that.
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