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Scavenger Hunt

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NEWS
March 7, 1986 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Perhaps it was cabin fever brought on by dreary weather that led to the Great South Jersey Scavenger Hunt. It came to public attention early yesterday when police in Pennsauken spotted five youths attempting to cart off a heavy U.S. mail box, possibly a federal offense. The boys said they were students at Bishop Eustace Prep in Cherry Hill, one of the area's finest academic high schools. They were taking part in a scavenger hunt in competition with three other schools, according to police.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | By Jodi Spiegel, Special to The Inquirer
Disciplinary action will be taken at Bishop Eustace Preparatory High School in the wake of a student-orchestrated scavenger hunt in which numerous items, including a 15-foot canoe and a New Jersey Bell charge-a-phone, were stolen from at least seven South Jersey towns, according to vice principal Cyril Bleistine. "There will be some suspensions involved," Bleistine said. "In addition to facing the consequences here, they're facing the consequences at home. " The scavenger hunt apparently began during the evening of March 5 and came to an end about 4 a.m. March 6 when Pennsauken police caught five students with a U.S. mailbox in the trunk of their car. They were charged with possession of stolen property.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
If your child might delight in spotting a cupola on a roof top, perhaps the Walking Tour of historic Market Street in Wilmington would be a fun family activity next weekend. "We have offered walking tours of Wilmington before," said Paula Holloway, director of public relations for the Historical Society of Wilmington, which is sponsoring the tour. "But this is the first time we will have a scavenger hunt. " Along with completing a walking tour of Market Street, with its rich history of a more industrial time in Wilmington, strollers will also be asked to pick out architectural details on the buildings.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | By Justin Pritchard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thirty-six Haverford High School students were arrested Friday night after what police describe as an "extensive" scavenger hunt in which scores of items were stolen. Street signs, business signs, pay-phone receivers, house shutters, a picket fence, a golf-ball washer, road-construction barricades and cones, vehicle hood ornaments, the township fire marshal's license plate - all were listed among the stolen property. The hunt was conducted throughout the township, mostly by members of the high school football team, police said.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mother Nature wasn't showing her best side. But that didn't daunt the elementary and secondary students' zeal. They had planned on spending a day in the great outdoors at the second annual Chester County Eco-meet, a competition designed to show off their knowledge of the environment, and they were determined to see it through. Rain or shine. It rained. Assembling at historic Springton Manor Farm in Glenmoore, about 80 students from 10 of Chester County's 12 public school districts and the Church Farm School in Exton spent the day dodging downpours while identifying fish, tracing wildlife tracks and scrounging for nature's treasures.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Feet in tiptoe condition? Eyes like a hawk's? If so, head on over to Old City on Oct. 2, when the Pennsylvania Ballet and the Old City Arts Association team up for the "First Friday" fall open-house series. "Ruby Friday," as they're calling it, named for choreographer George Balanchine's Rubies ballet to be performed Oct. 14 to 18, is a scavenger hunt for red objects scattered throughout 33 art galleries, antiques shops and decorative arts showrooms. Participants spotting six red objects - in six or more locations -will be eligible to win a season's subscription to the ballet, as well as other prizes.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years, orientation for teachers new to the Rancocas Valley Regional High School District followed the same routine: sitting in a room as district officials paraded before them to discuss policy and procedures. Last year, Henry Cram, the district superintendent, decided that routine needed to change. "We encourage teachers to be creative, but we were guilty of doing exactly what we had been telling teachers not to do," Cram said. "It was a numbing process for everyone. So rather than overload them with information, we've been asking our new teachers to go out and find the information.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Even lifelong Philadelphians who enjoy games will find these questions challenging: How many signers of the Declaration of Independence had the first name John? Which signer has a name that implies he would have been a good doctor? Your mission is to find the answers somewhere in Center City without the help of a Google search. Be quick about it - other teams are on your heels, competing with you for prizes ranging from a cash payout to bragging rights. "The region's parks, museums, and even old buildings make up an incredible field for scavenger hunts," said Meryl Levitz, president and chief executive officer of tourism booster Visit Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Packing hand tools and scorecards, the high school students were on a mission. They began at 8 p.m., dividing into teams and spreading through the township, police said. Before they were done, they had collected mailboxes, stop signs, lawn chairs, pumpkins - and police citations. Thirty students from Conwell-Egan Catholic High School face charges of disorderly conduct and fines of up to $300 for their roles in a large-scale scavenger hunt Tuesday night in Fairless Hills, police said yesterday.
NEWS
June 19, 1995
Let's talk about a threat to the spirit of today's youth. No, not vile Hollywood fare like Natural Born Killers. No, not such estimable scourges as illegal drugs. A much more modest threat, but annoying nevertheless: Adults who have utterly misplaced their sense of humor, whose killjoy countenance betrays no memory of what it's like to be 17, exuberant and eager to blow this pop stand called high school. Adults like the school officials who, in an out-of-scale punishment for a minor offense, are stealing commencement from four Hunterdon Central seniors.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
April 25, 2016
Name: Stray Boots. What it does: It's a walking tour disguised as a scavenger hunt. Available: In the App Store, requires iOS 6.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. In Google Play, requires Android 4.0 and up. Available for 40 cities in the United States and around the world. Rated 12 years and older for adult references. Cost: Free to download; tour cost varies by city, $4.99 to $11.99. What's hot: The app is designed for corporate and group tours as well as individual tours.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Thus far, our two children, 2 and 7, have met or exceeded their development markers. The same has not been true for all of their cousins. In fact, our 2-year-old is much more verbally advanced than some of his older cousins. Can you please offer some guidance for handling situations with uncles and aunts at family gatherings (every month or so) when the differences are out there for all to see? Our relatives are nice and also very human, which means they notice such things, and sometimes (to my eyes)
BUSINESS
December 23, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Sometimes it's a blessing when certain genes don't carry forward, regardless of how accomplished the parents. From the son of former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who still uses a flip phone, comes a high-tech scavenger hunt that is not just for fun, but for business use. Think employee training, product marketing, corporate team building, verifying booth visitations at trade shows, and introducing patients to hospital services. Turning that into an imaginative interactive experience enabled by a mobile app is "just where things are headed," said Jesse Rendell, who co-owns Scavify in Fishtown with brothers Jamie and Brad Moran and Steve Pjura.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Even lifelong Philadelphians who enjoy games will find these questions challenging: How many signers of the Declaration of Independence had the first name John? Which signer has a name that implies he would have been a good doctor? Your mission is to find the answers somewhere in Center City without the help of a Google search. Be quick about it - other teams are on your heels, competing with you for prizes ranging from a cash payout to bragging rights. "The region's parks, museums, and even old buildings make up an incredible field for scavenger hunts," said Meryl Levitz, president and chief executive officer of tourism booster Visit Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Sunday morning, strengthen your limbs while supporting a good cause - opposing illegal handguns in Philadelphia - at PSR Philadelphia's (Physicians for Social Responsibility) eighth annual Legs Against Arms 5K and 1-Mile Fun Walk at Arcadia University. Registration begins at 7:30 and the race begins at 9. Youths 12 and younger can run the 5K or participate in the 1-mile walk for free. The race, in collaboration with the Celebration of Peace program, will feature an exhibit hosted by community organizations and student groups at 9:30 inside Arcadia's Commons Building.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
Inquirer staff writer Virginia Smith is writing this week from the Philadelphia Flower Show. These posts appeared on her blog, "Kiss the Earth," at philly.com/kisstheearth. Read her stories at philly.com/ginny, and other Flower Show coverage at philly.com/flowershow. Victoria: The Seductress Got your attention, did I? "The Seductress," in this case, is the Victoria water lily, an "aquatic marvel" that is on display in the show's central feature. A hefty new book about this amazing plant - 468 pages, $69.99 - is making its debut here.
SPORTS
June 28, 2012 | By Tyler Jett, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his first crack of the bat this season, Chase Utley sent a wave of electricity through the Citizens Bank Park seats Wednesday night. The Phillies tried to ride the emotion, but a comeback came up short, and that energy proved to be nothing more than helium. The Phillies' bullpen provided the needle, and the Pirates popped the Phillies' Utley Day party balloon. A half-inning after the 33-year-old second baseman homered in his almost movie-scripted return, Pittsburgh took the lead with three runs and didn't look back, resisting a Philadelphia comeback to win, 11-7, in front of 44,057 fans searching for hope, life, some sort of change to their season - anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
From noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, families can enjoy an Old Fashioned Picnic and Victorian festivities at Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion in West Germantown. Kids can have their faces painted, play croquet, go on a scavenger hunt, and throw a ring to win prizes. At a duck hunt game, toddlers can fish for rubber princess and pirate ducks in a small blow-up pond. Eric Geoffrey of the Give & Take Jugglers will juggle and ride a unicycle. Foods made famous during the Victorian era such as hot dogs, root beer, and ice cream sundaes will be sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Two years after singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell released the ambitious and career-defining folk opera Hadestown - a musical retelling of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice set in Depression-era America - she's back with a decidedly different but equally ambitious effort, Young Man in America. Produced by Todd Sickafoose, who also helmed Hadestown, the new album features several New York-based rock and experimental jazz musicians, and has Mitchell inhabiting several musical characters, male and female.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Maki Somosot
Saturday Art out of doors Children and adults can enjoy an educational and cultural experience along Kelly Drive, home of some of the city's best-known sculptures. One on of the fall's Sculpture Saturdays, families can create their own sculptures and learn about public art through audio tours while jamming to world music including African drumbeats, calypso, folk rock, and Brazilian rhythms. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Fairmount Park along Kelly Drive. Free. Information: 215-546-7550, www.museumwithoutwallsaudio.org/sculpture-saturdays . Friday What's brewing The colonial capital of brewing, Philadelphia honors its historical roots with Elfreth's Alley Brew Fest, a culinary gathering with beer history lectures, food-and-beer pairing recommendations, home brew contests and a bountiful helping of special sausages cooked by award-winning chef Walter Staib of City Tavern.
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