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Schindler S List

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Dennis the Menace II Society, Rising Son-in-Law, The Remains of the Dazed and Confused . . . It's all beginning to blur: More than 250 movies later, 1993 has finally decided to call it quits. The Oscar campaigns are underway, the 10-best lists have been tallied, the moguls have jetted to Aspen and Maui for the holidays. And we're left here sifting through the rubble, trying to remember which Anthony Hopkins-Emma Thompson tale of repressed Brits came out this year (The Remains of the Day)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Huey P. Long, the Depression-era Louisianan whose despotic reign as governor, and then senator, was built on deriding the rich and powerful and championing the poor and oppressed, was, without argument, a larger-than-life figure. And Broderick Crawford, who won an Oscar for his portrayal of Willie Stark in 1949's All the King's Men - an adaptation of Robert Penn Warren's Pulitzer Prize-winner about a Louisiana populist inspired by Long - was a burly, barrel-chested guy. But the only thing big about Sean Penn, who plays Stark in this laughably ill-advised and whoppingly miscast remake, is his hair.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | BY ABE KRIEGER
I love the movies - the big screen, the sound, the stadium seating. Nothing like watching a blockbuster movie on its opening weekend. So why don't I go to movies much anymore? The answer is you, the inconsiderate, the loud and the feeble-minded. At least 25 percent of moviegoers fall into this category, I know this because one of you is always in front, behind or on either side of me. Problem moviegoers fall into one of the following universally recognized sub- classes of human being: The dumb couple: She just doesn't understand the plot, so he has to explain it to her every 10 minutes.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
President Clinton jogged with his buddy and former press secretary Dee Dee Myers yesterday. The first woman to hold the job was pushed out when Clinton's rankings took a turn for the south. After a run around Fort McNair, the twosome chatted with staffers in the Rose Garden and Dee Dee headed to the White House with the prez for breakfast. She says she's a lot healthier now that she's getting some sleep and although not gainfully employed full-time yet, she's doing a two-week hosting gig on CNBC's "Equal Time.
NEWS
March 27, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Since federal law does not officially ban "Forrest Gump" cliches until midnight, I can still say that picking the Oscars this year is like box of chocolates - we don't know what we're going to get. This makes 1995 a radical change from recent years, when picking winners in most major categories was an easy business. The career triumphs of Spielberg and Eastwood made things simple in '93 and '94, and even "The Silence of the Lambs" was an obvious choice in '92. "Gump" is the clear favorite, but it's not as ironclad as "Schindler's List" was last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's hard to imagine that the most successful filmmaker in history - a man with a clutch of Oscars, multimillion-dollar homes in the Pacific Palisades, Manhattan and East Hampton, and a principal stake in DreamWorks SKG, the first studio to be created in decades - could possibly be insecure. But entering his suite in the Ritz-Carlton Buckhead here, Hollywood's commander-in-chief is as anxious as a dogface on D-Day. His face is breaking out, says Steven Spielberg, pointing to a microscopic blemish on his cheek.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | Daily News wire services
LOS ANGELES CASTRATED HUBBY, WIFE MAKE UP A lawyer for a woman accused of castrating her husband said yesterday that the couple has reconciled and wants the charges dropped. Public defender Nan Whitfield said Aurelia and Jaime Macias want to put the Sept. 20, 1992, attack behind them and rehabilitate their 17-year marriage. "She, and he, just wish the case would be dismissed," Whitfield said. Aurelia Macias, 34, is accused of severing her husband's testicles with a 5-inch pair of scissors as he slept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1994 | By Christopher Cornell, FOR THE INQUIRER
So when do video collectors get to own, or at least rent, the films that won the big Oscars this week? The short answer: Don't hold your breath. Of the major winners, only The Fugitive, with best supporting actor Tommy Lee Jones, is on video now. The Piano (best actress, best supporting actress, best original screenplay) is due May 25. But most of this year's winners are still in their original theatrical runs. In other years, many winners had ended their runs by the time they won, which allowed them to be brought back for triumphal victory laps through theaters before heading to home video.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS and KYW-3
Next Monday is the night we wait for each year: the Academy Awards ceremony. But you don't have to wait to cast your vote. Every day this week you can pick your favorites in a different Oscar category. Just call the number below from your touch tone phone and follow the directions. On March 21, look for the complete line-up of the Oscar Phone Poll winners in the Daily News Yo! section, along with an Oscar scorecard to help you follow along with that evening's actual winners. TO VOTE FOR BEST DIRECTOR, call 854-2955.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Quick. Name Al Pacino's greatest performances. Panic in Needle Park; The Godfather; Serpico; Dog Day Afternoon; The Godfather, Part II, and Sea of Love. So which one earned the bantam-sized heavyweight his Oscar? After going 0-for- 6 in nominations, Pacino won last year for . . . Scent of a Woman. Hoo-hah, indeed. Now, Katharine Hepburn, the most-nominated, most-winning performer in Academy Award history. (She's 4-for-12.) Greatest performances? Probably Little Women, Alice Adams, The Philadelphia Story, The African Queen, Summertime and Long Day's Journey Into Night.
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NEWS
January 18, 2013
Leon Leyson, 83, who was the youngest of 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by Oskar Schindler, died Saturday in Whittier, Calif., after a four-year battle with lymphoma, his daughter, Stacy Wilfong, told the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Leyson was nearly 10 when Germany invaded Poland in 1939. Six months later, his family was sent to a ghetto in Krakow. He survived as mass killings and deportations to concentration camps escalated. Mr. Leyson, who lost two brothers during the Holocaust, at 13 was the youngest of the Jewish workers Schindler, an industrialist, saved by declaring them necessary for production at his factories.
NEWS
October 9, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg has grown accustomed to praise. One of the world's most successful filmmakers, ever, anywhere, he has received Oscars and honorary doctorates, won awards for public service and humanitarianism, and been granted nearly every superlative a man of art, thought, and heart could imagine. But he still seemed sincerely moved last night to be joining the ranks of the distinguished recipients of Philadelphia's Liberty Medal. "I am very, very genuinely humbled by this," Spielberg said after bowing his head so former President Bill Clinton, chairman of the National Constitution Center, could slip on the red, white, and blue ribbon with the heavy medallion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Huey P. Long, the Depression-era Louisianan whose despotic reign as governor, and then senator, was built on deriding the rich and powerful and championing the poor and oppressed, was, without argument, a larger-than-life figure. And Broderick Crawford, who won an Oscar for his portrayal of Willie Stark in 1949's All the King's Men - an adaptation of Robert Penn Warren's Pulitzer Prize-winner about a Louisiana populist inspired by Long - was a burly, barrel-chested guy. But the only thing big about Sean Penn, who plays Stark in this laughably ill-advised and whoppingly miscast remake, is his hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the Most-Nominated scenario, Chicago wins. In the Oscar-Remembers-the-Holocaust model, The Pianist wins. According to the Prosthetically-Enhanced-Thespian theory, Nicole Kidman takes the statuette - by a nose. During the weeks leading to this year's Academy Awards, pundits, studio execs, oddsmakers, fervent fans, and many of the 5,700-plus voting members of the academy have offered up arguments concerning who, what, why and how respective nominees will grab the prize. "Sometimes it's a guessing game, and in other cases it's obvious.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The problem with history isn't that it's written by the winners - the problem is that nobody reads it. Most of us would rather go to the movies, where history comes with special effects and popcorn. Movie history is not always reliable, but it's always brief. The missile-crisis movie "Thirteen Days," for example, is two hours - about 10 minutes per day. The movie's Web site helpfully offers a bibliography of 23 scholarly books, all flawlessly factual. But given the choice between a year's worth of fact, and a two-hour, action-packed Kevin Costner movie, we'll settle for the latter.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Argentine government restored a $900-a-month pension last week to the widow of the man featured in the film Schindler's List. A change of government in December disrupted the payment to Emilie Schindler, ordered last year by former President Carlos Menem. German industrialist Oskar Schindler is credited with saving nearly 1,300 Polish Jews from Nazi concentration camps by drawing up lists of fictitious jobs to convince the German authorities that the "workers" were essential to the war effort.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | BY ABE KRIEGER
I love the movies - the big screen, the sound, the stadium seating. Nothing like watching a blockbuster movie on its opening weekend. So why don't I go to movies much anymore? The answer is you, the inconsiderate, the loud and the feeble-minded. At least 25 percent of moviegoers fall into this category, I know this because one of you is always in front, behind or on either side of me. Problem moviegoers fall into one of the following universally recognized sub- classes of human being: The dumb couple: She just doesn't understand the plot, so he has to explain it to her every 10 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's hard to imagine that the most successful filmmaker in history - a man with a clutch of Oscars, multimillion-dollar homes in the Pacific Palisades, Manhattan and East Hampton, and a principal stake in DreamWorks SKG, the first studio to be created in decades - could possibly be insecure. But entering his suite in the Ritz-Carlton Buckhead here, Hollywood's commander-in-chief is as anxious as a dogface on D-Day. His face is breaking out, says Steven Spielberg, pointing to a microscopic blemish on his cheek.
NEWS
October 29, 1996 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a warm summer day in 1942 when two trucks driven by German soldiers stopped on a street where Sol Urbach was walking. Urbach, 15, was one of about 40,000 Jews who had been sent to the ghetto of Krakow, Poland. He was one of 100 people loaded onto the trucks. "We didn't know whether we were being taken out to be shot, or to a concentration camp," Urbach, now 70, recalled, speaking to students recently at the College of New Jersey in Trenton. "Nobody told Jews where they were going.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In The American Film Institute Salute to Steven Spielberg, there are the predictable clips of the classic thrills and chills the director has given the world in big pictures, from Jaws to Jurassic Park. But the tribute also includes a little film, which few people outside his family have seen, that says even more about his unique gifts than the monster hits do. In a flickering home movie, made with the 8mm camera the very young Spielberg was forever borrowing from his father, there are hints of things to come.
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