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October 25, 2012 | Associated Press
Syracuse quarterback Ryan Nassib is one of 15 players nationwide to be named a National Football Foundation National Scholar-Athlete. The honor cites Nassib, a Malvern Prep graduate, for excelling in the classroom, leading the Orange football team, and staying involved in community activities. NFF scholar-athletes get scholarships to help with graduate school tuition, and they're eligible for the William V. Campbell Trophy, presented to the top scholar-athlete in college football.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Lan Van, 18, is spending part of her summer vacation in school before she enters Bryn Mawr College this fall. Van, who graduated in June as valedictorian of her class at Penn Wood High School, was one of six Pennsylvania high school students to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's High School Honors Workshop. Across the country, 312 students were selected, according to Jeff Sherwood, spokesman for the Energy Department. Van has been at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee since July 10. She will be taking part in field studies in environmental science until Saturday.
NEWS
November 20, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Surveying Paul Fussell's elegantly crammed Walnut Street apartment, one suspects how and why Philadelphia's great scholar-curmudgeon ended up knocking out his droll new study, Uniforms: Why We Are What We Wear (Houghton Mifflin, $22). Late at night, while wife and fellow writer Harriet Behringer sleeps, the 78-year-old author of The Great War and Modern Memory - named by Modern Library as one of the 20th-century's top nonfiction books - undoubtedly wanders amid his rooms of war and travel bric-a-brac in full regalia of one sort or another.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW HAVEN, CONN. - Claude-Anne Lopez, author and scholar of Benjamin Franklin's papers, has died at age 92. Lopez started her studies of Franklin's papers at Yale University with secretarial-type work and rose to a top editor's job. Her son, Larry Lopez, said that she had Alzheimer's disease and died Friday at her New Haven home. Lopez spent years working on "The Papers of Benjamin Franklin," a project at the university to collect, edit and publish Franklin's writings. She specialized in the American founding father's private life, and wrote a handful of books about him. Former Yale colleague Jonathan Dull ranks Lopez as one of the 20th century's great Franklin scholars.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Alan Westin, 83, one of the first and most widely respected scholars to explore the issues of privacy in the information age, died Monday at a hospice in Saddle River, N.J. He had cancer, his son, Jeremy Westin, said. A professor of public law and government, Mr. Westin taught at Columbia University for nearly four decades. Through his prolific academic writing and frequent media appearances, he became nationally known as one of the most knowledgeable, prescient, and reasonable voices on privacy questions in modern society.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | by Jeremy Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
When Christopher Savoy got called into the principal's office in 1994, it changed his future. He had been selected along with nearly a dozen other students from John Bartram High School to participate in the Philadelphia Futures "Sponsor a Scholar" program. Last night, 61 high school students, including Savoy, were honored for completing their education, and gaining college acceptance. The ceremony was held in Montgomery Auditorium at the Central Library at Logan Square. This was Philadelphia Futures' fifth annual ceremony to honor high school graduates, and their first time honoring graduates of higher education.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you want to sit quietly and read a book, don't go to a Talmudic library. It will be full of Jewish men in yarmulkes rocking back and forth and shouting - even singing - at each other. Vocal activity, we are told in The Talmud and the Scholar (tonight at 9 on Channel 12), is one of the underlying precepts of the Talmud, the huge book of Jewish law. "The student is commanded to say its words out loud," explains Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz. But the singing? "The Talmud says, whoever learns without singing, the learning isn't worth very much," says another teacher.
NEWS
January 19, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roland Mushat Frye, 83, of Strafford, an English literature scholar awarded the Bronze Star during World War II, died of complications from heart disease Thursday at Waverly Heights retirement community in Gladwyne. Dr. Frye combined his expertise in literature, theology and art history to produce thoughtful tomes on subjects such as imagery in the works of John Milton, feminist language for God, and creationism. He wrote 10 books and hundreds of scholarly articles, frequently exploring religious topics.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A stockroom sorter. A business owner. An English professor and scholar. A poet. A gardener. Norman T. Gates, 95, of Haddonfield, held those titles and more. And he remained active in scholarly work until a few days before he died. Mr. Gates, a man who knew reinvention well and was never too old to excel in new passions, died of an aneurysm Saturday, April 17, at Marlton Rehabilitation Hospital. He was born in New York City and moved with his family to a farm in Reading when he was about 5. After graduating from Wyomissing High School in 1931, Mr. Gates enrolled at Dickinson College.
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NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
When anthropologist Philippe Bourgois began the research for his Ph.D. in 1981, he never imagined that the scenes he witnessed in El Salvador would haunt him decades later. "I thought I'd be staying relatively safely in refugee camps," he said. "The invasion that I got trapped in took everybody by surprise. " Thirty-four years later, the experience of running for his life amid El Salvador's civil war, and hiding in caves for 10 days before escaping across the Lempa River into Honduras, is never far from his mind.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rutgers University wants to organize a massive community service event through its Camden campus, it turns to its "civic scholars," dozens of undergraduate students who have committed to dedicating a large part of their college lives to civic engagement. The Rutgers-Camden students put in at least 300 hours each year: working with neighborhood groups, attending conferences and workshops, organizing campuswide days of service during student orientation and Martin Luther King's Birthday.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Schmidt Campbell graduated from Girls High in Philadelphia in 1965 with the confidence that she could make a difference. And she has. The art history and humanities scholar transformed the Studio Museum in Harlem from a rented loft over a liquor store into the country's first accredited black fine arts museum. She ran the prestigious Tisch School of the Arts at New York University for more than two decades. She serves as vice chair of a U.S. presidential committee seeking to elevate the importance of art in public schools.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
La Salle University scholar Stuart Leibiger found his way to Washington - the president, not the state - through a series of excursions. As a boy, he immersed himself in Lincoln, visiting presidential sites during a family trip through Illinois. He detoured into Civil War history in high school, met up with Madison and Jefferson while an undergraduate at the University of Virginia. Not until he was earning his doctorate at the University of North Carolina in the 1990s did he fully arrive at his destination, immersing himself in the public and private lives of the nation's first president.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
From the opening chorus of Bach's St. Matthew Passion , audiences at the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia performance at Girard College on Sunday will be hearing something a bit alien. Instead of a children's chorus sailing over the top of the grand double-choir interchange, adult operatic voices among the vocal soloists will be in their place. During recitatives, the typical harpsichord won't be heard. Who is responsible for these hard-to-explain decisions? The chorus' namesake, Felix Mendelssohn, who rescued the St. Matthew Passion from roughly a century of obscurity in 1829 with a performance adjusted to his 19th century, as opposed to Bach's 18th.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Wilbert Hilliard McCabe, 72, of Yeadon, a longtime music scholar and teacher in the Philadelphia public schools, died Thursday, Nov. 13, of cardiac amyloidosis at his home. A child prodigy reared in South and then West Philadelphia, Dr. McCabe had memorized the city's major streets by age 6, began to study piano at age 3, and at 6 appeared in a musical program with the singer and actor Paul Robeson, his family said. His uncle Charles A. McCabe, a violinist and trailblazer for musicians of color, was the young Dr. McCabe's role model.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hours of trying to calm a fussy 3-month-old led Carolyn Kent Rovee-Collier to a lifetime study and new understanding of infant psychology. Dr. Rovee-Collier's creative solution - discovered in 1965 while she was working on her doctoral thesis - involved tying a ribbon to baby Benjamin's ankle so he could set his crib mobile in motion on his own. Benjamin's response proved that preverbal infants could learn and remember, according to Dr. Rovee-Collier's son...
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN THE ORTHODOX Jewish community of Northeast Philadelphia, one of the most revered figures was Rabbi Aaron Felder. He was not only a great scholar but also a loyal friend who was always available to help anyone, Orthodox or not, and he could tell a good joke. Far from the kind of scholar who stays immersed in books, studying arcane texts, Rabbi Felder liked to get out of his synagogue and engage the life of the city. "He was a man of the world," his longtime friend, Rabbi Solomon Isaacson, told the Jewish Exponent . Felder, for many decades the spiritual leader of B'nai Israel-Ohev Zedek at Castor and Solly avenues in the Northeast, died Friday at age 70. "No. 1, he was a scholar," Isaacson said.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
IT WASN'T exactly "When Harry Met Sally" when Haleh met Shaul. Haleh Esfandiari and Shaul Bakhash are both Iranian, both highly and Western-educated, but Haleh is Muslim and Shaul is Jewish. When they planned to marry almost 50 years ago, before the Iranian Revolution turned the clock back to the Bronze Age, their families were shocked, says Shaul, but they got over it, says Haleh, "when they realized how much we loved each other and what sensible people we were. " They were married in a civil ceremony in Vienna in 1965.
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