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October 25, 2012 | Associated Press
Syracuse quarterback Ryan Nassib is one of 15 players nationwide to be named a National Football Foundation National Scholar-Athlete. The honor cites Nassib, a Malvern Prep graduate, for excelling in the classroom, leading the Orange football team, and staying involved in community activities. NFF scholar-athletes get scholarships to help with graduate school tuition, and they're eligible for the William V. Campbell Trophy, presented to the top scholar-athlete in college football.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Lan Van, 18, is spending part of her summer vacation in school before she enters Bryn Mawr College this fall. Van, who graduated in June as valedictorian of her class at Penn Wood High School, was one of six Pennsylvania high school students to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's High School Honors Workshop. Across the country, 312 students were selected, according to Jeff Sherwood, spokesman for the Energy Department. Van has been at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee since July 10. She will be taking part in field studies in environmental science until Saturday.
NEWS
November 20, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Surveying Paul Fussell's elegantly crammed Walnut Street apartment, one suspects how and why Philadelphia's great scholar-curmudgeon ended up knocking out his droll new study, Uniforms: Why We Are What We Wear (Houghton Mifflin, $22). Late at night, while wife and fellow writer Harriet Behringer sleeps, the 78-year-old author of The Great War and Modern Memory - named by Modern Library as one of the 20th-century's top nonfiction books - undoubtedly wanders amid his rooms of war and travel bric-a-brac in full regalia of one sort or another.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Alan Westin, 83, one of the first and most widely respected scholars to explore the issues of privacy in the information age, died Monday at a hospice in Saddle River, N.J. He had cancer, his son, Jeremy Westin, said. A professor of public law and government, Mr. Westin taught at Columbia University for nearly four decades. Through his prolific academic writing and frequent media appearances, he became nationally known as one of the most knowledgeable, prescient, and reasonable voices on privacy questions in modern society.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW HAVEN, CONN. - Claude-Anne Lopez, author and scholar of Benjamin Franklin's papers, has died at age 92. Lopez started her studies of Franklin's papers at Yale University with secretarial-type work and rose to a top editor's job. Her son, Larry Lopez, said that she had Alzheimer's disease and died Friday at her New Haven home. Lopez spent years working on "The Papers of Benjamin Franklin," a project at the university to collect, edit and publish Franklin's writings. She specialized in the American founding father's private life, and wrote a handful of books about him. Former Yale colleague Jonathan Dull ranks Lopez as one of the 20th century's great Franklin scholars.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | by Jeremy Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
When Christopher Savoy got called into the principal's office in 1994, it changed his future. He had been selected along with nearly a dozen other students from John Bartram High School to participate in the Philadelphia Futures "Sponsor a Scholar" program. Last night, 61 high school students, including Savoy, were honored for completing their education, and gaining college acceptance. The ceremony was held in Montgomery Auditorium at the Central Library at Logan Square. This was Philadelphia Futures' fifth annual ceremony to honor high school graduates, and their first time honoring graduates of higher education.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you want to sit quietly and read a book, don't go to a Talmudic library. It will be full of Jewish men in yarmulkes rocking back and forth and shouting - even singing - at each other. Vocal activity, we are told in The Talmud and the Scholar (tonight at 9 on Channel 12), is one of the underlying precepts of the Talmud, the huge book of Jewish law. "The student is commanded to say its words out loud," explains Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz. But the singing? "The Talmud says, whoever learns without singing, the learning isn't worth very much," says another teacher.
NEWS
January 19, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roland Mushat Frye, 83, of Strafford, an English literature scholar awarded the Bronze Star during World War II, died of complications from heart disease Thursday at Waverly Heights retirement community in Gladwyne. Dr. Frye combined his expertise in literature, theology and art history to produce thoughtful tomes on subjects such as imagery in the works of John Milton, feminist language for God, and creationism. He wrote 10 books and hundreds of scholarly articles, frequently exploring religious topics.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A stockroom sorter. A business owner. An English professor and scholar. A poet. A gardener. Norman T. Gates, 95, of Haddonfield, held those titles and more. And he remained active in scholarly work until a few days before he died. Mr. Gates, a man who knew reinvention well and was never too old to excel in new passions, died of an aneurysm Saturday, April 17, at Marlton Rehabilitation Hospital. He was born in New York City and moved with his family to a farm in Reading when he was about 5. After graduating from Wyomissing High School in 1931, Mr. Gates enrolled at Dickinson College.
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NEWS
May 4, 2016
Daniel Aaron Scholar and historian, 103 Daniel Aaron, 103, a literary scholar and historian who helped develop the multidisciplinary academic field of American studies and who helped launch the publishing project of literary classics known as the Library of America, died Saturday at a hospital in Cambridge, Mass. Dr. Aaron, the son of Jewish immigrants from Russia, became one of the foremost scholars of American culture and helped shape a new field of academic study and codify the nation's literary legacy.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
In a small, cluttered office at the University of Pennsylvania, a bespectacled scholar deciphers the writings of an ancient culture that has enthralled him for decades. This month, his work can be found in an academic journal titled Antiquity. And oh, by the way, on the tail fin of a 747. Heavy metal called, so Simon Martin, associate curator at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, obligingly answered. The veteran rockers of Iron Maiden chose an ancient Maya theme for their latest album, The Book of Souls , and Martin, 54, is the man to see on that subject.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
When former Princeton professor and Salem City native son Forman Sinnickson Acton died two years ago at age 93, he was lauded as a technology pioneer, a gifted educator who could explain what others could barely comprehend. A private man of almost rakish charm, Acton was a world traveler, a circumspect bon vivant , a scholar whose love of learning went undimmed by the years. In the life of the mind, he ranged wide and far. Acton was a contemporary of John Nash, along with some of math and engineering's other beautiful minds.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
A History of Ancient Rome By Mary Beard Liveright. 535 pp. $35 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mary Beard begins her fine history of ancient Rome in medias res, in the middle of things, more than six centuries after the appearance of the little town on the Tiber that would grow into a world power. Beard, a professor of classics at Cambridge University, has her reasons for coming in halfway through the show. As the real origins of Rome are lost in the mists of myth (forget that she-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The following news may be greeted with rejoicing or horror: The Tallis Scholars, the British chamber choir that made an international reputation based on music written before 1600, has been joining the 21st century - and brought its updated self to the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul on Friday. The beloved Estonian mystic minimalist Arvo Pärt, now 80, dominated the program, but was heard alongside music of the group's 16th-century namesake Thomas Tallis and his near-contemporary John Sheppard.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia native who studies at Harvard University and has advanced proficiency in eight languages is one of 32 winners of the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship announced Sunday. Rivka B. Hyland, who spent her freshman year of high school at Friends Select School in Center City before transferring to Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, will study for two to three years, expenses paid, at the University of Oxford in England. The winners were selected from among 869 applicants nominated by 316 colleges and universities.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WHEN Dana Dwirantwi first walked into Young Scholars Charter School a few years ago in search of a new school for her two boys, she didn't know what she would find. Now, with one son in seventh grade and the other recently graduated from the North Philadelphia charter, Dwirantwi feels as though she's found a home. "The teachers are so different from my experience," said Dwirantwi, of Northeast Philly, calling the school a "diamond in the rough. " "I got way more . . . communication, in terms of phone calls and texts and emails.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Indonesia N. Young of Camden packs up to go to Temple University next week, one of the treasures she'll take along is a photo album made by her mother. "This album is dedicated to all the ppl who didn't believe Our Dream," Ericka R. Young wrote to her daughter. "We was just trying to leave the Hood! You made it!" Like the classic Biggie Smalls song, "Juicy," which Ericka referenced, the photo album tells the story of a kid in poverty rising to success. Seeing her single mother struggle, Indonesia knew what she had to do: "I needed to go to college and graduate and get out of the ghetto in order to live the way I really wanted to live.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
After graduating from George Washington High School in the Northeast in 2010, Larry Liam Ching Liu breezed through Community College of Philadelphia and earned an associate's degree with honors. With a scholarship from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, Liu transferred to the University of Pennsylvania, where he made the dean's list and earned a degree in sociology and economic policy in May. Now, the 23-year-old, who juggled jobs as a research assistant at Penn and sold shoes in the Northeast, has been named the Cooke Foundation's first Oxford Scholar.
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