FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 25, 2012 | Associated Press
Syracuse quarterback Ryan Nassib is one of 15 players nationwide to be named a National Football Foundation National Scholar-Athlete. The honor cites Nassib, a Malvern Prep graduate, for excelling in the classroom, leading the Orange football team, and staying involved in community activities. NFF scholar-athletes get scholarships to help with graduate school tuition, and they're eligible for the William V. Campbell Trophy, presented to the top scholar-athlete in college football.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Lan Van, 18, is spending part of her summer vacation in school before she enters Bryn Mawr College this fall. Van, who graduated in June as valedictorian of her class at Penn Wood High School, was one of six Pennsylvania high school students to participate in the U.S. Department of Energy's High School Honors Workshop. Across the country, 312 students were selected, according to Jeff Sherwood, spokesman for the Energy Department. Van has been at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee since July 10. She will be taking part in field studies in environmental science until Saturday.
NEWS
November 20, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Surveying Paul Fussell's elegantly crammed Walnut Street apartment, one suspects how and why Philadelphia's great scholar-curmudgeon ended up knocking out his droll new study, Uniforms: Why We Are What We Wear (Houghton Mifflin, $22). Late at night, while wife and fellow writer Harriet Behringer sleeps, the 78-year-old author of The Great War and Modern Memory - named by Modern Library as one of the 20th-century's top nonfiction books - undoubtedly wanders amid his rooms of war and travel bric-a-brac in full regalia of one sort or another.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW HAVEN, CONN. - Claude-Anne Lopez, author and scholar of Benjamin Franklin's papers, has died at age 92. Lopez started her studies of Franklin's papers at Yale University with secretarial-type work and rose to a top editor's job. Her son, Larry Lopez, said that she had Alzheimer's disease and died Friday at her New Haven home. Lopez spent years working on "The Papers of Benjamin Franklin," a project at the university to collect, edit and publish Franklin's writings. She specialized in the American founding father's private life, and wrote a handful of books about him. Former Yale colleague Jonathan Dull ranks Lopez as one of the 20th century's great Franklin scholars.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Alan Westin, 83, one of the first and most widely respected scholars to explore the issues of privacy in the information age, died Monday at a hospice in Saddle River, N.J. He had cancer, his son, Jeremy Westin, said. A professor of public law and government, Mr. Westin taught at Columbia University for nearly four decades. Through his prolific academic writing and frequent media appearances, he became nationally known as one of the most knowledgeable, prescient, and reasonable voices on privacy questions in modern society.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | by Jeremy Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
When Christopher Savoy got called into the principal's office in 1994, it changed his future. He had been selected along with nearly a dozen other students from John Bartram High School to participate in the Philadelphia Futures "Sponsor a Scholar" program. Last night, 61 high school students, including Savoy, were honored for completing their education, and gaining college acceptance. The ceremony was held in Montgomery Auditorium at the Central Library at Logan Square. This was Philadelphia Futures' fifth annual ceremony to honor high school graduates, and their first time honoring graduates of higher education.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you want to sit quietly and read a book, don't go to a Talmudic library. It will be full of Jewish men in yarmulkes rocking back and forth and shouting - even singing - at each other. Vocal activity, we are told in The Talmud and the Scholar (tonight at 9 on Channel 12), is one of the underlying precepts of the Talmud, the huge book of Jewish law. "The student is commanded to say its words out loud," explains Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz. But the singing? "The Talmud says, whoever learns without singing, the learning isn't worth very much," says another teacher.
NEWS
January 19, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roland Mushat Frye, 83, of Strafford, an English literature scholar awarded the Bronze Star during World War II, died of complications from heart disease Thursday at Waverly Heights retirement community in Gladwyne. Dr. Frye combined his expertise in literature, theology and art history to produce thoughtful tomes on subjects such as imagery in the works of John Milton, feminist language for God, and creationism. He wrote 10 books and hundreds of scholarly articles, frequently exploring religious topics.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A stockroom sorter. A business owner. An English professor and scholar. A poet. A gardener. Norman T. Gates, 95, of Haddonfield, held those titles and more. And he remained active in scholarly work until a few days before he died. Mr. Gates, a man who knew reinvention well and was never too old to excel in new passions, died of an aneurysm Saturday, April 17, at Marlton Rehabilitation Hospital. He was born in New York City and moved with his family to a farm in Reading when he was about 5. After graduating from Wyomissing High School in 1931, Mr. Gates enrolled at Dickinson College.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN THE ORTHODOX Jewish community of Northeast Philadelphia, one of the most revered figures was Rabbi Aaron Felder. He was not only a great scholar but also a loyal friend who was always available to help anyone, Orthodox or not, and he could tell a good joke. Far from the kind of scholar who stays immersed in books, studying arcane texts, Rabbi Felder liked to get out of his synagogue and engage the life of the city. "He was a man of the world," his longtime friend, Rabbi Solomon Isaacson, told the Jewish Exponent . Felder, for many decades the spiritual leader of B'nai Israel-Ohev Zedek at Castor and Solly avenues in the Northeast, died Friday at age 70. "No. 1, he was a scholar," Isaacson said.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
IT WASN'T exactly "When Harry Met Sally" when Haleh met Shaul. Haleh Esfandiari and Shaul Bakhash are both Iranian, both highly and Western-educated, but Haleh is Muslim and Shaul is Jewish. When they planned to marry almost 50 years ago, before the Iranian Revolution turned the clock back to the Bronze Age, their families were shocked, says Shaul, but they got over it, says Haleh, "when they realized how much we loved each other and what sensible people we were. " They were married in a civil ceremony in Vienna in 1965.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Before his 2005 move to Charlottesville, Va., where he died Monday, Feb. 3, at age 90, University of Pennsylvania professor Thomas P. Hughes was a familiar presence in Chestnut Hill, bicycling to and from the early service at the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, or buying crackers and cheese for the intimate gatherings of neighbors and Penn colleagues he hosted at his house on Millman Street. It wasn't just any house. Dr. Hughes' home was that icon of modern architecture known as "Mother's House," designed by Robert Venturi for his mother, Vanna.
SPORTS
November 27, 2013 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Villanova women's basketball coach Harry Perretta couldn't help but needle forward Jessica Wamala when he put her into Sunday's basketball game against Lafayette. "Can you stop thinking about stuff and go in the game for a minute?" Perretta remembers asking her. Perretta has done a lot of things in his long career, but he'd never had the chance to tell a Rhodes Scholar to get in the game. On Saturday, Wamala had been in New York, interviewing for the most prestigious postgraduate fellowship program in the world.
SPORTS
November 27, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
Completely overwhelmed. That was the understandable reaction of Villanova's Jessica Wamala on Saturday in New York City, when she found out she was a Rhodes scholar. "I was in a conference room with about 12 other [candidates]," she said. "Only two can win. And we were there for maybe seven hours, as we all went through the interviews. So you get progressively anxious. Then all of a sudden the panel walks in and they said my name. I was like, 'Wow.' But I'd made some really good relationships with a couple of them, so there wasn't any [celebrating]
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN The schoolchildren, most younger than 10, waited with little feet dangling off the folding chairs in a bright auditorium as they listened for their names. Then, one by one, they came forward and reached out tiny hands to accept their ticket to college. "The sooner the better," said Lamont Young, holding two silver "congratulations" balloons for his 7-year-old daughter, Ashriel, who will receive a scholarship to Rutgers University if she continues on a successful academic path.
SPORTS
November 2, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State senior guard John Urschel has been named a National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame Scholar-Athlete, one of 16 football student-athletes chosen from across all NCAA and NAIA divisions, the NFF announced Thursday. Urschel, who was named an Academic All-American last year, receives an $18,000 scholarship for post-graduate studies with the award, and also is a finalist for the William V. Campbell Trophy presented to the nation's top college football scholar-athlete. The winner of the Campbell award, which carries an additional $25,000 post-graduate scholarship, will be announced Dec. 10 in New York where Urschel and the other scholar-athlete winners will be honored.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel G. Armistead, 85, a leading scholar of Spanish literature and language whose research unearthed a treasure trove of medieval writings and folklore, died Wednesday, Aug. 7, at his home in Davis, Calif., of complications from surgery. A Chestnut Hill native, Dr. Armistead lived in Fort Washington for 28 years before relocating in 1982 to join the department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California, Davis. He retired in 2011 as professor emeritus. Dr. Armistead, a graduate of William Penn Charter School, earned his undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral degrees in Spanish literature from Princeton University between 1946 and 1955.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
At times, it has seemed that the Constitution has held up far better during more than 200 years than the National Constitution Center has over a decade. Jeffrey Rosen recently became the center's sixth president and chief executive. Or possibly its fifth. No one is sure whether to count interim and repeat directors. The turnover rate in leadership, coupled with bewildering programming - exhibits on Princess Diana, Bruce Springsteen - left the center with a confused mission and disappointing results.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
By Alice P. Gast There are few experiences more exciting and rewarding for a college or university president than watching your graduates being selected in the National Basketball Association draft. It was truly inspiring to see Lehigh University's C.J. McCollum and Bucknell University's Mike Muscala chosen from among the most accomplished college basketball players in the United States. Both have led their teams to Patriot League conference titles and NCAA tournaments. Both also graduated with their classes this spring, achieving academic success and displaying exemplary leadership on their campuses.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|