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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Interboro School District teachers and school board members have reached a tenative contract agreement and expect to hold ratification votes next week. But at three other area school districts - William Penn, Penn Delco and Southeast Delco - negotiations continue as the scheduled opening day of schools draws closer. The threat of a strike and the long-term damage it can cause was on the minds of Interboro school board members as they negotiated with the teachers. "The Garnet Valley strike loomed over our decision process," said John Costello, Interboro school board president.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
David P. Blatt, the Council Rock School District's assistant superintendent since 1987 and former principal of Council Rock High School, was tapped Monday night as the district's chief administrator, replacing veteran Superintendent John J. Byrne. In an unscheduled agenda item, the board approved a three-year contract for Blatt, with a starting salary of $92,000. The board quickly voted, 9-0, on a motion by Harold G. Osborne to hire Blatt, "effective immediately upon the absence of Superintendent Byrne.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer for a Bensalem school board member arrested after police allegedly found a small amount of marijuana in her bedroom says that the drugs were not hers and that she expected to be vindicated. Sherri Underland "had no knowledge" of the drugs in her house, lawyer Keith Bidlingmaier said Tuesday. If the evidence shows otherwise, Bucks County District Attorney David Heckler said, he will press Underland to resign. "To the extent that we would be negotiating any kind of disposition, certainly that would be something we would look for," Heckler said.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Suspended school board member Andrew McIlvaine will be reinstated Monday after he completes a mandatory orientation this weekend, board president Keith Herman said. McIlvaine was temporarily removed from the board last week after the state education commissioner suspended him for missing the training, a violation of a statutory requirement for new school board members. "I think that was a reasonable decision, given the offense," said McIlvaine, who was elected in April. "I take this very seriously, and I respect the process.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
The Lower Moreland school board awarded bids for its trash removal and renovations of the middle school at its meeting Tuesday night. The middle school is being renovated to accommodate grades three through six. It now houses grades five through eight. Superintendent Robert W. Pellicone said tables and countertops would be lowered, an additional elementary administration suite would be built and minor renovations would be done to a lavatory. A bid of $12,185 for general construction was awarded to William Kern & Sons of Rockledge.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Lillian Micko, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill school board has set Oct. 2 as the deadline for applications to fill the seat of board member John Wydra, who recently resigned, citing career demands. The resignation of Wydra, a board member since 1985, was announced Aug. 10 and will take effect Sept. 1. The board, which will appoint a replacement to serve until the expiration of Wydra's term in April, asked Monday that applications and resumes be sent to Assistant Superintendent Joseph Picogna at the Heritage School Administration Building on Browning Lane.
NEWS
December 3, 1999
A new era is coming in the governance of Philadelphia schools, now that a City Charter change approved last month gives the mayor more direct control over the school board. The likely election of lawyer Pedro Ramos as president of the city's Board of Education bodes well for that new era. It's clear Mr. Ramos, who joined the board in 1995, has the blessing of Mayor-elect John Street. Mr. Ramos, 34, knows what it takes to make it through the public schools. He is a guy who came from the North Philadelphia streets to end up at Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll, a top-end, politically connected law firm.
NEWS
March 25, 1986 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro Board of Education last night voted to request an investigation by the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office into allegations of tampering with student records and election-law violations. The action came after board candidate Bill Shaw said high school seniors and recent graduates received letters processed on the school board's computer, urging them to vote for board incumbents Margaret Davis and Roy Paige and for candidates Joe Oliver and Hill Presley Jr. School board President William Whitehurst said the board had not been told about any such letters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
A group of Camden residents who want the city's school board to be an elected body rather than one appointed by the mayor suffered a setback Monday when a judge dismissed their lawsuit against the school district. The suit, filed in April in Superior Court in Camden, asked that city residents be allowed to vote on whether to appoint or elect members of the board. It also argued that the question should have gone before voters in April 2014, as specified in 2010 legislation that ended the state's takeover of the City of Camden.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
The Upper Darby school board's surprise decision last month to place Superintendent Richard F. Dunlap Jr. on paid administrative leave was at least partly rooted in a dispute over a redistricting proposal for the system's crowded schools - a controversy that some officials say is tinged with racial resentments in one of the region's most diverse suburbs. Dunlap had been promoting a plan that would have given him the discretion to move students to schools outside their neighborhoods to correct imbalances in class sizes throughout the district.
NEWS
August 6, 2016
In the Upper Darby School District, life doesn't just imitate art these days. It upstages it. As the play Nice Work If You Can Get It ends its run this weekend at the district's Performing Arts Center, the Upper Darby school board finds itself deep in a drama that is steeped in mystery and shrouded in secrecy. The plot so far: Richard F. Dunlap Jr. is on a paid leave of absence as district superintendent. But the school board has taken no formal action on Dunlap, according to Dana Spino, the district's manager of media services.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
At the height of summer, when few people pay attention to school goings-on, Upper Darby Superintendent Richard F. Dunlap Jr. has been quietly placed on paid leave. The July 21 action by the school board, which offered no explanation, took even high-level administrators by surprise. "It did happen suddenly with no formal announcement," said district spokeswoman Dana Spino. "I was told by other administrators. " Hearing through the rumor mill about the 56-year-old Dunlap's absence, Upper Darby's state representative, Republican Jamie Santora, said he asked a school board member what had happened, but got no answer.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
ISSUE | NORMA SHAPIRO An inspiration Senior U.S. District Judge Norma Shapiro was a remarkable jurist, but I remember her for her contributions to the Lower Merion community (" Norma Shapiro; pioneering set prison cap ," July 23). I think of Norma Shapiro as a member and then president of the Lower Merion school board. She treated students, teachers, administrators, and parents with great attention and respect. She was always available to listen privately to one's concerns and suggestions.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane announced Friday that five of the longest-serving and highest-paid board members on the $12.3-billion Hershey Trust for poor children would resign over the next 18 months after a probe into the board's compensation, governance, and travel expenses. Friday's settlement would create a new majority for the embattled nine-member board. It also was the second attempt by Kane in four years - and the fourth since 1994 - to fix the scandal-plagued charity.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
On May 12, 1971, a fight among white and black female students set Haddon Heights and Lawnside on edge. The high school in mostly white Haddon Heights, attended also by students from historically black Lawnside, was evacuated, and closed for two days; 16 students were disciplined, and virtually the entire Lawnside enrollment marched in protest and boycotted classes. After generating days of newspaper headlines, the tensions subsided. The school soon closed for the summer, and after a few years, the story seemed all but forgotten.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Grace Toohey and Daniel Block, STAFF WRITERS
Liana Roadcloud lives in a town where homeowners pay some of the region's highest property tax rates, where the schools struggle academically, and where the fiscal year that begins Friday will bring exactly what she doesn't want: another tax hike. The William Penn School District insists it has squeezed every nickel to keep the increase on her tax bill at just under 2 percent. For Roadcloud, that means a $58 bump next year, to $3,091 for a Lansdowne home valued around $70,000. "People don't mind paying for something if they're getting something in return," said Roadcloud, whose son is a sophomore at Penn Wood High School.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
The directors of the Hershey School oversee an educational facility in central Pennsylvania for impoverished children, but you might not know it from their expense reports. Eight directors ran up an $18,000 tab for a weekend board meeting last June at New York's Waldorf-Astoria hotel, according to internal records obtained by the Inquirer. All 10 spent $362,000 in travel, meals and hotels over the last 21/2 years, including at least 60 limousine rides, often from the Philadelphia and Baltimore airports.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Without debate or comments from the public, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission adopted a policy Thursday night that immediately allows transgender students to, among other things, be referred to by their pronoun of choice; use their bathroom of choice; and go out for the athletic team of their gender choice, either boys' or girls'. "It's really important for us to acknowledge and respect all children and how they identify themselves," Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said after the meeting.
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