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NEWS
November 1, 1987 | By Roy Seneca, Special to The Inquirer
Audubon Park school board president Judy Vanrell has expressed concern about overcrowding and a lack of discipline on school buses carrying Audubon Park children to elementary schools in Audubon. Vanrell said she believes that there may be more than 60 students at one time on some buses that have a 54-student capacity. While following a bus home one day, Vanrell said, she counted more than 60 children getting on and off the bus, and she noticed students walking in the aisles and hanging out the windows.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | Associated Press
LAKEWOOD, N.J. - Thanksgiving will be just another day on the road for many school bus drivers in one South Jersey town. Lakewood in Ocean County is asking scores of drivers to work in order to transport about 18,000 Orthodox Jewish students to and from their private schools in the township. State law requires public school districts to pay for transportation to private-school students every Monday through Friday from September through June. In most places, private schools are closed on major holidays.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those shamrocks suddenly adorning Medford school buses might look like St. Patrick's Day decorations, but they'll be part of the local landscape for years to come. The Medford School District on Tuesday became the first district in New Jersey to carry advertising on its buses. The five-inch shamrocks belong to a small chain of supermarkets that bought the first ads. "I'm ecstatic," Superintendent Joseph Del Rossi said Tuesday morning at the district's transportation center on Chairville Road.
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forty students from the Orchard Valley Middle School and two school bus drivers were briefly hospitalized yesterday after they experienced nausea and dizziness while riding on school buses that had been sprayed by vandals with foam from fire extinguishers. Fred DeLia, the township's director of emergency management, said the students and drivers were treated at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-Washington Division and released. He added that an employee at the township school district's fenced-in bus lot, at Ganttown Road and Hurffville-Cross Keys Road, called police about 3:30 a.m. after spotting three juveniles climbing over a fence and leaving the lot. A search showed that vandals had removed the fire extingushers on seven or eight buses and sprayed the powdery chemical inside the vehicles.
NEWS
February 21, 1995 | BY JIM ACTON
Schoolkids are learning firsthand what it's like to live in a society that is limiting the rights of its children. Kids are getting this lesson every time they hop on a school bus equipped with a video surveillance camera. More and more school districts are doing this. But the very fact act of recording students' behavior is more outrageous than what's being captured on film. I agree, video cameras will undeniably show who did what to whom. By reviewing "game films," school officials can identify those children who were fighting, those who were praying, if it comes to that, and those who were innocent.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | By Lillian Micko, Special to The Inquirer
Cherry Hill School Superintendent Philip Esbrandt said last night that the district would know in a few weeks exactly how many non-public school children it would be busing in the coming school year. Speaking at a board meeting, Esbrandt said the board was required by state law to notify non-public school students about transportation services by Aug. 1. The board, he said, will receive bids for all school bus routes today. Non-public school busing in Cherry Hill became an issue last spring when leaflets were distributed declaring that the board was planning to end busing services.
NEWS
April 29, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN AIR Foul school buses Buying emissions-free electric buses will help clean up the air in Philadelphia and make our city more livable ("SEPTA gets grant to add 25 electric buses next year," April 20). It's a huge step in the right direction. But since there are about 480,000 school buses on the road in the United States, are we also funding school transportation system efforts to reduce that source of pollution? What happens to old buses that are being replaced? Are they being dismantled and recycled, or are they being sold so they can continue to belch diesel fumes outside of our city and state?
NEWS
November 16, 2009
WHEN SCHOOL buses idle for longer than a few minutes, there is a potential risk of pollution being spewed around the neighborhood and schools. This goes for other vehicles or diesel trucks dropping off food for the school cafeteria. For children, health experts state that diesel exhaust presents a serious health concern, especially in asthmatics, and can trigger an attack. Idling trucks or cars may not seem like a huge concern, but the Environmental Defense Fund states that they put 130,000 tons of carbon dioxide and 940 tons of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere each year.
NEWS
January 20, 1986 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
The Centennial school board has voiced its opposition to making seat belts in school buses mandatory, favoring instead a system of padded seats, such as those in the district's newer buses. At a board meeting Tuesday night, members discussed a recent suggestion by U.S. Rep. Peter H. Kostmayer (D., Bucks) that federal legislation make seat belts mandatory in school buses. Board member George Kelly said that the board was against the legislation and that it preferred seats with padding on the fronts and backs.
NEWS
August 26, 1986 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
The Voorhees Township Committee last night gave preliminary approval to a law to keep school bus drivers from parking the buses overnight at their homes. The committee approved, on first reading, an amendment to a zoning ordinance prohibiting buses in residential areas at any time except to pick up or discharge passengers. "Basically, it's the overnight parking in driveways or streets that's the objection," Mayor James L. Curran said. He said residents had complained about school buses parked on private property.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Jillian Condran, For The Inquirer
Every day in 10th-grade English class, there was a new stack of photocopied handouts to put in our three-ring binders. Four pages; five pages; once even an 80-page packet. By the end of the year, it all weighed 6 pounds. On any given day, I usually carried three or four textbooks, which weigh perhaps 4 pounds each. Add in notebooks and other papers, and I was easily shouldering 15 to 20 pounds on my walk to and from school, nearly a half-mile each way. Was it damaging my back?
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
Camden High School junior Janayzia Morris' typical commute to school is just under 2.5 miles on foot through some of the city's dangerous neighborhoods. Camden students who make a similar trek say they have witnessed shootings, stabbings, drug sales, and gang fights. Often, people are just yelling in the streets, no matter the time of day. Prostitutes are part of the neighborhood landscape. Morris, 18, fears for the safety of younger students she sees walking alone. "It's stuff that we shouldn't be seeing," Morris, who lives in the Fairview section, said, shaking her head.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | ID THEFT PennDot within law For decades, Pennsylvania law has permitted access to drivers' records by certain entities strictly for lawful purposes, such as vehicle insurance, credit, jobs, and safety checks of drivers who operate school buses and heavy trucks ("ID theft taken too lightly," May 24). Applicants for insurance, jobs, and credit authorize access to their records. Similar programs are in place in many other states. When a state Budget Office audit found problems with one data aggregator with authorized access, the state Department of Transportation cut off its access.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania school districts may be spending millions too much on busing, the state auditor general said Tuesday. Examinations by his office found 19 school districts in 11 counties paid a total of $54.8 million more for transportation during select periods between 2004 and 2014 than what the state determined was the maximum amount it would consider for the calculation of reimbursements, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said. Only one of those districts had competitively bid transportation services during the audit periods, according to DePasquale.
NEWS
April 29, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN AIR Foul school buses Buying emissions-free electric buses will help clean up the air in Philadelphia and make our city more livable ("SEPTA gets grant to add 25 electric buses next year," April 20). It's a huge step in the right direction. But since there are about 480,000 school buses on the road in the United States, are we also funding school transportation system efforts to reduce that source of pollution? What happens to old buses that are being replaced? Are they being dismantled and recycled, or are they being sold so they can continue to belch diesel fumes outside of our city and state?
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The Camden School District is offering a daylong, five-week summer school this year for as many as 1,000 students from ages 3 to 19, officials said Tuesday. The free program, from July 6 through Aug. 5, will focus on reading and math but also include field trips, sports, and other curriculums. The voluntary program will include breakfast and lunch, and run from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students can take school buses to get there, officials said. Summer school programs offered by the district in previous years ran only to midday, and provided no transportation.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A passerby walking a dog discovered the body of a man hanging in a West Chester park near a school Monday morning, police said. Police received a call around 6:50 a.m. about a white male hanging from a swing set in Marshall Square Park near Henderson High School. Police said the man lived in the West Chester area, but declined Monday afternoon to identify him or give his age, pending notification of his family. The death appears to have been a suicide, Detective Bob Kuehn said.
NEWS
November 3, 2015
IT'S A SIN for Kenyatta Johnson to have a casino built by the Cordish Cos. with the adverse publicity the company got. The Cordish Cos. have had many racial suits files against them; several were settled out of court. Kenyatta Johnson was planning his birthday party/campaign fundraiser bash at the company's South Philadelphia Xfinity Live location, until he was told that it would be a conflict of interest. He is most certainly a perfidious person. Alfred Augustus Philadelphia   School buses need external cameras At the start of the new school year, I had several conversations with parents about school-bus safety.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
PILGRIMS SWEATING over how to make their way into and around the city when Pope Francis is in town got some great news from SEPTA yesterday. The transit authority announced that it has extended sales of its one-day Regional Rail passes at the stations that will be open during the visit. Riders can pick them up for $10 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, according to SEPTA. Additionally, three-day transit passes - good for rides on the subway, buses and trolleys - are on sale at stops throughout the Market-Frankford and Broad Street lines.
NEWS
May 13, 2015
IT APPEARS to me that what is wrong with Philadelphia public schools is not that there are not enough charter schools but that there are too many. As the city threatens to raise my property tax to pay for more charter schools, it seems to me that while the charter-school idea was filled with promise when it was introduced, it is overwhelming an already overwhelmed public-school system. The cost to educate a child in a charter school is higher than it cost the public-school system.
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