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School Buses

NEWS
October 11, 1995 | By Andrea Hamilton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Kay Henry, the second school bus was the last straw. When the first yellow bus was parked next to her neighbor Robert Bongiovanni's house on St. Michael's Court in October 1992, she didn't like it one bit. But when Henry checked with Northampton Township officials, she learned that Bongiovanni was not violating any law, so she and her neighbors dropped the matter. When the second bus appeared in May, however, the residents of the tidy neighborhood vowed they would fight back.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | By Stella Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
For decades, summertime brought a major headache to school officials around the country. While students were on vacation, administrators engaged in a tedious process that lasted most of every summer: manually planning the routes that would bus children to and from classes every day. Mostly, they juggled piles of dogeared index cards and marked routes by stretching yards of yarn from pin to pin on pockmarked maps - always hoping everything would...
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
By the end of the school year last June, the 74 buses in Lenape Regional High School District's fleet had traveled about 1.5 million miles. And unbeknownst to the district, said Christopher D'Arcy, Lenape's transportation director, every single one of those miles was in violation of state regulations. The district's buses are the right color - National School Bus Yellow - but the familiar red-and-gray lettering, Lenape Regional High School District, that has been on every school bus since the district was founded in 1958, violates state rules.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Doug Donovan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Twice a day during the school year, Betty Luff makes certain the windows and doors of her Newtown Park condominium are shut tight. If they're not, the dust and diesel fumes from the convoy of school buses that pours out of the lot across the street fill her home. Luff's house is directly across the street from where 140 yellow school buses exit two times a day, once in the morning to take students to schools in the Council Rock District and once in the afternoon to take them home.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Public-school students might face staggered schedules and longer rides on school buses under a plan the Whitman administration unveiled yesterday intended to keep school transportation costs down. Noting that New Jersey has one of the most inefficient school transportation systems in the nation, Education Commissioner Leo Klagholz said his plan targeted districts that filled their school buses to only 64 percent of capacity. Such districts will have to submit a plan of action to the state for the 1998-99 school year outlining how they would become more efficient in transporting students to school.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
In recent years, car makers, with more than a little nudge from government, have been working to make cars safer, installing features such as anti-lock brakes and air bags on everything from Corvettes to Cadillacs. And a car can't just be equipped with seat belts anymore. Forty-two states require people to wear them. But there is one particular group of people that largely does not have to be buckled up when riding in one particular type of vehicle - children on school buses.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With some school buses filled to only one-fifth of capacity, the school board is considering eliminating busing for high-school students next year. Superintendent David Archibald said at a board work session Wednesday night that the move could save the district about $350,000 of the $1.5 million it spends on busing annually. The proposal is scheduled for a vote May 9 as part of the preliminary budget. Only 81 students, or about 15 percent, of the 521 at Lower Moreland High School ride morning buses, while 69 ride in the afternoon and 46 take the 3:45 p.m. late bus. The district also transports 382 students to 37 nonpublic schools.
NEWS
August 28, 1995 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three months ago, the township Board of Supervisors told the Central Bucks School District it could not use the old Eastern RotorCraft site on Route 313 as an operations center and depot for the district's bus fleet. But shortly after dawn on Saturday, more than 90 yellow school buses drove into the lot and parked in neat rows at the site anyway. "We will be issuing a cease and desist order," said township board President John Carson this weekend. The township will have a special meeting to discuss the issue tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. at the township building on Wells Road.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Jillian Condran, For The Inquirer
Every day in 10th-grade English class, there was a new stack of photocopied handouts to put in our three-ring binders. Four pages; five pages; once even an 80-page packet. By the end of the year, it all weighed 6 pounds. On any given day, I usually carried three or four textbooks, which weigh perhaps 4 pounds each. Add in notebooks and other papers, and I was easily shouldering 15 to 20 pounds on my walk to and from school, nearly a half-mile each way. Was it damaging my back?
NEWS
March 18, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
LOOKING DECIDEDLY GLUM, a young student gazes out a school bus window as he rides past City Hall. School buses are not affected by the SEPTA strike, but many students who normally ride public transportation had to find alternate ways of getting to and from schools yesterday.
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