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School Choice

NEWS
June 16, 1993 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The school board figures $50,000 is what it costs them every year for a teacher, and in March, during the last hectic days of a very tough budget year, each $50,000 meant something. In the end, 17 teaching positions were slashed, including two high school English teachers, three elementary-school gym teachers and three teachers from the elementary talented-and-gifted program. When they left, the primary grades' program ended. Now comes a crisis of a different sort, involving that same figure, the same job, the same budget.
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey Assemblyman John Burzichelli likes the school-choice program. But Burzichelli believes that the increasingly popular program has been used in some cases to destroy the competitive balance in high school sports. He plans to do something about that. Burzichelli on Tuesday announced plans to introduce legislation that would ensure that school-choice students play sports on their sending-district teams, not their choice teams, unless the sending district does not offer the sport.
NEWS
March 27, 2003
In a recent advertisement, Edithe Fulton, the Ocean County teacher serving as president of the New Jersey Education Association, asserted that the new federal education law known as "No Child Left Behind" is a Trojan horse that will "pave the way" for school choice, more charter schools, and publicly funded private-school scholarships for low-income children. Fulton is correct. The federal law requires school districts to offer successful alternatives to all children in schools that a state has documented as failing.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 75 people gathered at the Lower Merion High School Auditorium last night to listen to two experts debate a hot topic in education: school choice. Audience members provided questions to State Rep. John A. Lawless (R., Montgomery), who moderated the debate and is a co-sponsor of choice legislation currently in the legislature. Topics covered in the debate included the constitutionality of providing tuition vouchers to all students in the state, the effect that would have on the Lower Merion school system, funding for the learning disabled and the cost of the voucher system to the taxpayer.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | By Suzette Hackney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware County, home of four of the poorest school districts in the state, was the site of the latest skirmish over school-choice vouchers. The topic, which has yet to make it to the state legislature, was hotly debated Tuesday at Academy Park High School, where a six-member panel of state and local officials discussed the proposed bill. If school vouchers become law, parents living in Chester Upland, Chichester, William Penn and Southeast Delco School Districts could receive money to send their children to schools in another district.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An African American group favoring school choice says it has collected 20,000 signatures from Philadelphia residents and hopes to collect up to 30,000 more by year's end in a show of support for tuition vouchers. The City-Wide African American Grassroots Coalition for School Choice plans to present the petitions to 13 Philadelphia legislators - 12 of them black, one of them Latino - in an effort to show that African Americans do support vouchers, said Walter Palmer, chairman of the Palmer Foundation and a spokesman for the group.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | By Timothy Lamer
No issue unites the right as school choice does. The religious right, neocons, culturecons, supply-siders and libertarians all argue that vouchers will unleash market forces and break the iron grip of the National Education Association. Many on the right also see school choice as a means to promote moral and religious education. But is publicly funded school choice really conservative? In arguing for vouchers, many of my brethren on the right sound a lot like liberals. Some examples: The Egalitarian Argument.
SPORTS
June 7, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - The NJSIAA is working with the state Department of Education to evaluate the impact of the school-choice program on sports, according to NJSIAA executive director Steve Timko. Timko said Wednesday at the organization's last meeting of the school year that the NJSIAA is trying to gather as "much data as possible" before devising a strategy for addressing an issue that some school officials believe has threatened the competitive balance in public-school sports. New Jersey Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
September 17, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took one game for the new school-choice program to make an impact on Colonial Conference football. One game. What happens in a month? A season? A couple of years of "recruiting" - oops, I meant to say "attracting" - student athletes to schools outside their home district? The summer buzz in the Colonial Conference was about Sterling, since the Silver Knights had "attracted" several student athletes from other districts through its school-choice option, which is linked to its Junior Naval ROTC program.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Ed Feulner is president of the Heritage Foundation We're used to hearing bad news from the education front - poor test scores, falling literacy, slipping standards. But the new academic year brings a welcome change: School-choice programs have expanded significantly in recent months. Indeed, the Wall Street Journal has already dubbed 2011 "The Year of School Choice. " As of this month, 18 states and Washington have policies that support private-school choice. But public-school choice options also continue to grow.
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