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School Choice

NEWS
August 1, 1995
There has never been a speech by a white male American leader that rivals President Clinton's open and honest discussion of civil rights. He listed statistics about disparity in the lifestyles of the fortunate and unfortunate, and affirmed: "Affirmative action has been good for America. " When President Clinton says, "Mend it," we should do just that, not discard a success - affirmative action. JOSEPH E. MOORE JR. Chair, Labor/Industry Ambler Branch, NAACP Penllyn Our illustrious legislators vote down the "school choice" bill, yet there is a huge uproar over proposed elimination of "affirmative action.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | By David Boldt
Is school choice the best way to increase teacher salaries? Harvard economist Caroline Hoxby suggests that it might be. Her hypothesis is based on simple economics: If you have a lot more schools trying to hire the kind of teachers who attract students, "the wage they pay should be greater," and the number of such teachers they hire should increase. She reports finding evidence of this effect from even the most minimal form of school choice, that being metropolitan areas where teachers (and residents)
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Members of the Pennsylvania House Committee on Education likely will get an earful tomorrow at another of their hearings held across the state on school choice. The panel is scheduled to convene at 9:30 a.m. at the Falls Township Municipal Building. Representing the superintendents of Bucks County's 13 school districts, Donald D'Amico, superintendent of the Neshaminy School District, said last week he would argue against choice. "Choice would mean that public schools would become the schools of last resort.
NEWS
June 4, 1995 | By Lewis J. Perelman
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge is just one of a cadre of current (mostly Republican) politicians to have their attempts at free-market education reform diverted by the dead end of school choice in the form of tuition vouchers or charter schools. In New Jersey, Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and Jersey City Mayor Bret Schundler have fallen into the same trap, as has House Speaker Newt Gingrich. While the freedom for families to choose what and how they will learn is not only just but economically crucial, true choice in learning depends on access to Knowledge Age tools, not Industrial Age schools.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A bill that would establish an educational choice system in Pennsylvania's public and private schools was the subject of an intense debate in the state Senate last night, with legislators on both sides angling to shape the legislation. The state Senate was expected to take a final vote today on the measure, which would allow parents of public school students to decide which public schools their children attend and provide $900 to defray tuition for those attending nonpublic schools.
NEWS
December 8, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The Senate and Assembly Education Committees postponed votes yesterday on school choice, the plan to allow a limited number of New Jersey children to attend public schools outside the districts where they live. Action was delayed after the Republican-sponsored bill continued to draw fire, not only from a variety of educational groups, but also from some Republicans. Adopting the program is a tacit admission that certain districts aren't up to par, said Assemblyman Gerald J. Luongo (R., Gloucester)
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Constitutional Party gubernatorial candidate Peg Luksik took on Philadelphia questions with characteristic directness: If elected, she'd abolish auto-emissions testing, push school choice and college instead of job-training, and attempt to pump up small businesses. She'd also pay for more police at the city and state levels. But she trashes the idea that reduced class-size can help the embattled Philadelphia School District. And she opposes any new gun controls. "I don't think that a gun control law is going to solve the problem," she said.
NEWS
March 15, 2001
One way big-government liberals disguise the true nature of their political agenda is with slogans. Nebulous terms like "common good" and "public interest" - and meaningless phrases like "we are all in this together" - divert attention from the facts that: Government's defining characteristic is its legal monopoly on physical force. Every social program must be paid for. "Common good" really means the good of some at the unchosen expense of others. Consider the monotonous references to our children, as in "Our children are our future.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A panel discussion on school choice is set for 7:30 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Archbishop Wood High School. Among the many legislators and public figures on the panel are State Sens. Stewart Greenleaf and David W. Heckler; State Reps. David J. Steil and Thomas Druce; former State House Speaker Bob O'Donnell; Attorney General Ernie Preate; David Kirkpatrick of the Road to Educational Achievement Through Choice (REACH), and the Rev. Horace Strand of the Faith Temple Christian Day School.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Although the school choice bill seems like a ghost of Christmas past, area educators warn that it's too soon for a eulogy. "I don't think there is any question it will come up again," said Colonial School Superintendent Stanley Durtan. "The question is, in what form?" The bill that passed in the state Senate and failed in a different form in the House earlier this month would have given parents vouchers of $900 to be used for school tuition. Proponents said the boost to private and parochial schools would have bettered public schools through competition; opponents said the voucher system could dismantle public education, especially in cities.
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